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Forum topic by JohnMcClure posted 10-10-2017 12:19 PM 945 views 0 times favorited 45 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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JohnMcClure

100 posts in 480 days


10-10-2017 12:19 PM

Topic tags/keywords: wood lumber id

Hi everyone,

Neighbors cut a dead tree. Bark looked like oak or any of the common hardwoods here (sweetgum, elm…)
Tree had no leaves due to being dead, and they seem to remember that when it did, the leaves weren’t like any of the other typical trees around here. (North of Houston, TX. Conroe, if you are a Texan.)

I milled some on the BS the first day – no spalting. Plain yellow with no character.
After 2 or 3 days, the other logs had grown a layer of fungus on the ends. I milled them and voila, all this spalting.


The wood is soft, like pine I guess. Growth rings are hard to see.
Here’s endgrain again with a penny for scale:


A penny for your thoughts on what wood this is? I was thinking maybe… Tamarind?

-- I'd rather be a hammer than a nail


45 replies so far

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JohnMcClure

100 posts in 480 days


#1 posted 10-10-2017 12:20 PM

I should mention that what really baffles me, is no sapwood/heartwood boundary…. it seems to be the same consistency all the way through!

-- I'd rather be a hammer than a nail

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Nubsnstubs

1207 posts in 1569 days


#2 posted 10-10-2017 01:18 PM

That looks a lot like Palo Verde, but to my knowledge, it only grows in arid climates. That wouldn’t be spalting if it is PV. Does it smell like you stepped in something a dog would deposit? ............. Jerry (in Tucson)

-- Jerry (in Tucson) www.woodturnerstools.com

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Lazyman

1508 posts in 1227 days


#3 posted 10-10-2017 01:23 PM

Any pictures of the bark or the tree’s shape before cutting it down? How big was the tree?

-- Nathan, TX -- Hire the lazy man. He may not do as much work but that's because he will find a better way.

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JohnMcClure

100 posts in 480 days


#4 posted 10-10-2017 01:37 PM

Jerry, it does not have much of a smell that I can detect, including while cutting and planing.

Nathan, The logs were about 12” across. At the base, maybe 16” across. Height – not certain, as it was in my neighbors’ back yard. As to shape, they did mention that it was unusual in that it didn’t have much “spread” – they felt like the branches didn’t reach out very far compared to the typical trees here.
Pics of bark, on the live edges of what I have milled:

-- I'd rather be a hammer than a nail

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gargey

862 posts in 615 days


#5 posted 10-10-2017 01:37 PM

Lots of magnolia around here, endgrain looks similar.

But magnolia bark doesn’t look like oak bark.

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HunterDS

45 posts in 339 days


#6 posted 10-10-2017 01:44 PM

My guess I’s some ornamental like China berry

-- Hunter, Houston TX

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HokieKen

4515 posts in 978 days


#7 posted 10-10-2017 01:45 PM

The bark and color look like Elm to me. Rapid spalting is pretty common in Elm as well IIRC.

-- Kenny, SW VA, Go Hokies!!!

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PPK

870 posts in 649 days


#8 posted 10-10-2017 01:53 PM



My guess I s some ornamental like China berry

- HunterDS

I’ll have to respectfully disagree with the Chinaberry – it has a much more open grain and is redder:

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I don’t know if it grows down there or not, but your tree kind of looks like a quaking aspen inside. The bark on QA’s is kind of funny – it looks like birch on the younger growth, but turns “oaky” looking as it ages. Its a real soft wood. I’ve seen a lot of punky (That’s a wood cutter’s name for spalted, lol) quaking aspen, which I just get frustrated with, since I burn it for firewood, and it doesn’t have many BTU’s…

-- Pete

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Ripper70

618 posts in 748 days


#9 posted 10-10-2017 01:53 PM

Spalder a.k.a. Spalted Alder.

-- "You know, I'm such a great driver, it's incomprehensible that they took my license away." --Vince Ricardo

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splintergroup

1705 posts in 1061 days


#10 posted 10-10-2017 02:20 PM

spalted beech?

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JohnMcClure

100 posts in 480 days


#11 posted 10-10-2017 03:05 PM

Thanks for the feedback, everyone. I looked up quaking aspen, and noticed it has a low Janka hardness – softer than pine – and this wood I have is definitely soft. So QA is definitely in the running.
Perhaps I’ll never know… or I’ll just say Spalder ya dope!

-- I'd rather be a hammer than a nail

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BurlyBob

5066 posts in 2105 days


#12 posted 10-10-2017 03:27 PM

John that’s definitely not aspen bark. Aspen bark is really quite smooth.

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Snipes

150 posts in 2084 days


#13 posted 10-10-2017 03:30 PM

basswood?

-- if it is to be it is up to me

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bondogaposis

4482 posts in 2190 days


#14 posted 10-10-2017 03:32 PM

Possibly cottonwood. Are there any dead leaves on the ground near stump?

-- Bondo Gaposis

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Lazyman

1508 posts in 1227 days


#15 posted 10-10-2017 06:11 PM

Bark doesn’t look quite right to me for cottonwood. It usually lighter/grayer in color and more deeply furrowed in a tree that large but the wood grain and upright/non-spreading habit look like a possibility. Cottonwood and quaking aspen are in the same genus (Populus) so the wood might be similar.

-- Nathan, TX -- Hire the lazy man. He may not do as much work but that's because he will find a better way.

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