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Forum topic by JSMorgan posted 10-09-2017 03:49 PM 747 views 0 times favorited 30 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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JSMorgan

29 posts in 110 days


10-09-2017 03:49 PM

Topic tags/keywords: finish

Good Morning! I am at my wits end on finishing the table legs and aprons. Let me start from the beginning: 1. I sanded everything to 180. 2. I applied 2 coats of General Finishes Dye. 3. I then applied 2 coats of GF Black Stain. 4.
I then applied a coat of Shellac. 5. I then applied 2 coats of GF Gel Stain. Sanding all between coats. From the time I put on the shellac I keep getting these “dull” spots and “stripes” on the wood. Hence the reason for the gel stain. Nothing seems to work. I’ll try and post 2 photos.


30 replies so far

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Loren

9605 posts in 3481 days


#1 posted 10-09-2017 03:58 PM

Insufficient build of shellac would be my
suspicion. It takes more than one coat
of shellac to seal a stained surface and
build a consistent surface film.

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JSMorgan

29 posts in 110 days


#2 posted 10-09-2017 04:08 PM

Loren: I plan on re-sanding and try one more time. I just don’t get why this is going on. It looks like there may have been air bubbles and once scuffed, it shows the same dull spots and doesn’t take a finish or a seal coat.

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Rich

1972 posts in 423 days


#3 posted 10-09-2017 04:49 PM

To add to Loren’s comment, use a 2 lb cut of shellac. Bulls Eye Seal Coat is a 2 lb cut and will build much faster than lighter cuts. You’ll still need multiple coats though.

-- No matter how much you push the envelope, it'll still be stationery.

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TheFridge

8287 posts in 1319 days


#4 posted 10-09-2017 04:50 PM

Could be the grain rising and diving. Hard to say.

I second Loren.

-- Shooting down the walls of heartache. Bang bang. I am. The warrior.

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AandCstyle

2901 posts in 2090 days


#5 posted 10-09-2017 09:38 PM

JS, have you tried rubbing out the finish with progressively higher grits until you reach your desired sheen?

-- Art

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JSMorgan

29 posts in 110 days


#6 posted 10-10-2017 03:16 PM

A&C: That’s the problem. It does not rub out. Any spot only gets bigger when you try to sand it. I did apply a coat of shellac (on a small place) as suggested above and it did improve some. I plan on adding a full coat of shellac and then wait a few days and try the gel stain again. Thanks for your help.

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ArtMann

677 posts in 649 days


#7 posted 10-10-2017 03:51 PM

I am just curious about the complex finishing schedule. That is a lot of different products and all of them need to 100% dried or cured before moving to the next step. That would require weeks.

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JSMorgan

29 posts in 110 days


#8 posted 10-10-2017 04:01 PM

Art: It has been weeks with several days between each coat, along with scuff sanding.

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Aj2

1171 posts in 1631 days


#9 posted 10-10-2017 04:11 PM

Black is the hardest finish to get right. Even a flat or satin look is difficult. Dont beat yourself up its not just you. :(

-- Aj

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JSMorgan

29 posts in 110 days


#10 posted 10-10-2017 04:22 PM

AJ: Thanks, I am earning that! I did a hutch and cabinet out of the same wood and steps and it turned out okay. Not great but seeing as this is my first project, not too bad.

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Rich

1972 posts in 423 days


#11 posted 10-10-2017 04:40 PM


Black is the hardest finish to get right. Even a flat or satin look is difficult. Dont beat yourself up its not just you. :(

- Aj2

That’s true for automobile paint jobs, but dye problems on wood have to do with color consistency and accuracy. And yes, they say black is a tough one to get even color on.

Maybe I’m misreading the OP, but it sounds like he’s having problems getting a smooth surface. That would be an issue with wood prep, top coat application or even contaminates since it’s not affecting the entire surface.

Am I wrong about that, JSMorgan? Is it the color or the quality of the surface?

-- No matter how much you push the envelope, it'll still be stationery.

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CharlesNeil

2142 posts in 3704 days


#12 posted 10-10-2017 05:03 PM

Whats the wood ?

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JSMorgan

29 posts in 110 days


#13 posted 10-10-2017 05:08 PM

Rich: Yes, it is the quality of the surface and it is effecting the finish. As for wood prep: Sanded to 180, wiped with mineral spirits, applied dye stain, scuffed with 180, reapplied dye stain, applied shellac then applied stain. Dull finish in surface and when sanded, the area seems to spread. As I’ve said, I did a base cabinet and hutch the same way and it turned out okay.

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JSMorgan

29 posts in 110 days


#14 posted 10-10-2017 05:56 PM

Mr Neil: Cherry

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CharlesNeil

2142 posts in 3704 days


#15 posted 10-10-2017 06:15 PM

did you wipe /brush the shellac I respectfully disagree about black being a hard color ,its one of the easiest, There is only one color of black.
Its the sheen and top coat that make the difference . Most blacks are not black, they are very dark blues /greens .
I am surprised your dying Cherry black…
Let me respond more in the am. In a class at the moment

We can fix this .

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