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Forum topic by Jeff8529 posted 10-09-2017 05:03 AM 280 views 0 times favorited 6 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Jeff8529

4 posts in 105 days


10-09-2017 05:03 AM

What would be the best specific product to use to create this look? Plus, would the product hold the pieces together like glue, or would some other reinforcement be required?

Thanks for your input-


6 replies so far

View Monte Pittman's profile

Monte Pittman

26218 posts in 2116 days


#1 posted 10-09-2017 09:16 AM

Epoxy resin like I used. Should hold by itself.

-- Mother Nature created it, I just assemble it.

View Gilley23's profile

Gilley23

302 posts in 160 days


#2 posted 10-09-2017 11:22 AM

Dyed epoxy

View Jeff8529's profile

Jeff8529

4 posts in 105 days


#3 posted 10-09-2017 02:36 PM

Can you link me to the product you use?

View Nubsnstubs's profile

Nubsnstubs

1176 posts in 1508 days


#4 posted 10-09-2017 03:57 PM


Epoxy resin like I used. Should hold by itself.

- Monte Pittman

Of course it’s going to hold. It looks like it’s on a plywood base, and has solid wood ends to keep it from seperating.. Duhh! It’s a beautiful table. Thanks for showing it.

Jeff, if what you pictured is what your final piece will look like, yes, you will need some support to attach the two pieces together and keep them together years down the road. Colored resin would hide any supports you put in. Route slots to accept dimensioned slats/strips of your choosing. I would probably use 3/4” plywood slats/strips as it’s reasonably stable and wouldn’t move much. All this of course would be on the bottom where it won’t be seen. Then, when this top mounts to the base, you’ve got more support.

I use Alumilite resins for all my castings, but System 2000 will work as well also. Put in Alumilite or System 2000, and choose what product you want to use. Their specs will tell you what product for the application you’re doing. ............ Jerry (In Tucson)

-- Jerry (in Tucson) www.woodturnerstools.com

View MrUnix's profile

MrUnix

5793 posts in 1977 days


#5 posted 10-09-2017 04:10 PM

If you go the epoxy route, be careful with a thick pour like that… it’s exothermic and that much epoxy will get very hot very quick. You can mitigate that somewhat by pouring in multiple layers, but then trying to get an exact color match between layers will become problematic. A casting resin, like what Jerry suggests, will help somewhat with the heat problem, but you still need to be aware and read the SDS for the product you use. Any of them can be tinted, and you can use a wide variety of things to do so – from powders to dyes, metal flakes to rocks, and everything in between.

Cheers,
Brad

PS: If you do use epoxy, get one that cures clear. For example, West System has a special hardener (#207) that is designed to cure clear.

-- Brad in FL - In Dog I trust... everything else is questionable

View Rich's profile

Rich

1669 posts in 367 days


#6 posted 10-09-2017 04:45 PM


If you go the epoxy route, be careful with a thick pour like that… it s exothermic and that much epoxy will get very hot very quick.

- MrUnix

I’ve found that setting time is a factor in the heat. If I mix an ounce total of 5 minute epoxy in a small plastic Solo portion cup, it’ll collapse the cup. The plastic softens that much. Much less so with slower setting product though.

-- No matter how much you push the envelope, it'll still be stationery.

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