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Safe finish for hot liquids?

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Forum topic by metroplexchl posted 10-08-2017 03:30 AM 1286 views 0 times favorited 21 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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metroplexchl

66 posts in 143 days


10-08-2017 03:30 AM

Topic tags/keywords: food safe finish hot liquids bowl mug coffee plate

I looked through archives and didn’t find (or maybe I missed) the answer. I want to make plates, bowls, and cups for my family to actually use. Most of the time there will be hot foods and/or liquids in them. Does anyone have any final answers on a safe finish for these that won’t alter the taste?

Or can point me to the right archived thread?

-- What ever you do, be good at it. -Abe Lincoln


21 replies so far

View pjones46's profile

pjones46

997 posts in 2481 days


#1 posted 10-08-2017 03:46 AM

Food Grade Mineral oil.

-- Respectfully, Paul

View Rich's profile

Rich

1984 posts in 428 days


#2 posted 10-08-2017 03:58 AM

I don’t think I’d enjoy drinking hot liquid from a cup finished with mineral oil — food grade or not.

Beyond that, I have nothing to say. I took the time to give information about orange wood to the OP, even taking the time to make a color-corrected photograph of the wood. I got no thank you, so strike one and you’re out.

-- No matter how much you push the envelope, it'll still be stationery.

View metroplexchl's profile

metroplexchl

66 posts in 143 days


#3 posted 10-08-2017 04:13 AM



Beyond that, I have nothing to say. I took the time to give information about orange wood to the OP, even taking the time to make a color-corrected photograph of the wood. I got no thank you, so strike one and you re out.

- Rich

What are you talking about? Are you saying I didn’t thank you for the photo and information? I posted immediately about it talking about how incredible the wood was and how that was the answer to the OP.

I even said “Woot! Woot!”.....

And then you said “You’re welcome”.....

-- What ever you do, be good at it. -Abe Lincoln

View metroplexchl's profile

metroplexchl

66 posts in 143 days


#4 posted 10-08-2017 04:17 AM



Food Grade Mineral oil.

- pjones46

Good idea. Have you eaten or drank from something you’ve made after finishing with mineral oil? I haven’t ever, so forgive my ignorance here. I wonder if it leaves some sort of after taste? What do people who make noggins and kuksas finish with…..if anything I wonder?

-- What ever you do, be good at it. -Abe Lincoln

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Andybb

552 posts in 442 days


#5 posted 10-08-2017 06:05 AM

Since people use MO on cutting boards with no problem or taste issues I am sure you’d be ok. I’d heavily soak it overnight then run it through the dishwasher or hand wash it. Mineral oil has no taste. I just dipped my finger in it. Like the label says, it’s definitely odorless, colorless and tasteless. I use it on my slate counter tops.

But, thinking about it, my question is why you’d need to coat it with anything. My son carved this spoon almost 15 years ago and it has never been coated with anything. It gets constant use and has probably been through the dishwasher literally 2000 times and has never warped, split or grown hair. It sat overnight last night in spaghetti sauce and it came out of the dishwasher looking like this today. So, other than making the color look richer, why even bother to coat it unless you’re having company over and want to show it off?

Plus, haven’t wooden bowls and cups been around for 10,000 years or more?

-- Andybb - GO HAWKS!

View Rick_M's profile

Rick_M

10637 posts in 2218 days


#6 posted 10-08-2017 06:28 AM

I did some research on this and as far as I can tell, the only fool proof, film finish for a cup is epoxy. But I didn’t want to drink from an epoxy cup. People make birch kuksa with no finish and they work fine but of course they will stain (or maybe not). Sometimes they boil them right after carving which should dry and shrink the wood a little.

-- http://thewoodknack.blogspot.com/

View metroplexchl's profile

metroplexchl

66 posts in 143 days


#7 posted 10-08-2017 06:59 AM



Since people use MO on cutting boards with no problem or taste issues I am sure you d be ok. I d heavily soak it overnight then run it through the dishwasher or hand wash it. Mineral oil has no taste. I just dipped my finger in it. Like the label says, it s definitely odorless, colorless and tasteless. I use it on my slate counter tops.

But, thinking about it, my question is why you d need to coat it with anything. My son carved this spoon almost 15 years ago and it has never been coated with anything. It gets constant use and has probably been through the dishwasher literally 2000 times and has never warped, split or grown hair. It sat overnight last night in spaghetti sauce and it came out of the dishwasher looking like this today. So, other than making the color look richer, why even bother to coat it unless you re having company over and want to show it off?
- Andybb

that’s a good point. For some reason, I thought that some woods were toxic and needed to be coated…

-- What ever you do, be good at it. -Abe Lincoln

View AlaskaGuy's profile

AlaskaGuy

3660 posts in 2147 days


#8 posted 10-08-2017 07:32 AM

Watch this before you make your finial choice

https://youtu.be/g2rTy3W-QEY

-- Alaskan's for Global warming!

View Andybb's profile

Andybb

552 posts in 442 days


#9 posted 10-08-2017 07:34 AM

I think I remember a forum about toxic wood saying that the issue was breathing the dust from such wood. But if a particular wood was toxic why make cups from it? I think you’d have to work hard to find toxic wood to make a cup from.

I guess my thought is that if you don’t coat it then there is nothing to wear off.

-- Andybb - GO HAWKS!

View Rick_M's profile

Rick_M

10637 posts in 2218 days


#10 posted 10-08-2017 04:47 PM

I would avoid using toxic wood and stick to tight grained domestic species. That’s just me.

-- http://thewoodknack.blogspot.com/

View LesB's profile

LesB

1362 posts in 3281 days


#11 posted 10-08-2017 05:07 PM

I can’t speak for using bowls and cups for “hot” food but I have had great success using a “salad bowl” finish made by either Behlen or General for regular use on plates, platers, and bowls. I usually put on 4 to 5 coats, sanding lightly between each application. In the last 20 years I have only had a problem with one salad bowl that was used almost daily and the finish wore thru allowing the salad dressing oil to get into the wood and stain it. This finish would also seal “toxic” wood if you happen to use it.

I agree that spoon and similar items are probably better treated with mineral oil or I have used processed walnut oil. The latter is polymerized (heat processed) so it soaks in and then hardens the wood. Occasional re-application would be a good idea.

-- Les B, Oregon

View metroplexchl's profile

metroplexchl

66 posts in 143 days


#12 posted 10-08-2017 06:06 PM

Thanks for all the excellent thoughts and answers. Here’s what I’ll try and report in after a lot of use:

Plates, bowls, spoons—I think I’m going to try a few plates and bowls with no finish, and few with MO, and a few with the Behlen or General salad bowl finish.

Cups, spoons, and bowls for warm/hot stuff—I’ll leave untreated and see how it goes

Also, I’ll need to learn what woods shouldn’t be used for food/drink applications.

Thanks all for helping me process through it!

-- What ever you do, be good at it. -Abe Lincoln

View oldnovice's profile

oldnovice

6433 posts in 3206 days


#13 posted 10-08-2017 08:14 PM

I have to agree with all those that tough it was distasteful to drink out of a container finished with any coating.
I not saying that it is unsafe just distasteful.
The only way to eliminate food contact is to line the container with a food safe metal or plastic!
You can then remove the liner for washing and preserve the wooden item both inside and outside!

-- "I never met a board I didn't like!"

View LesB's profile

LesB

1362 posts in 3281 days


#14 posted 10-09-2017 12:34 AM


Thanks for all the excellent thoughts and answers. Here s what I ll try and report in after a lot of use:

Plates, bowls, spoons—I think I m going to try a few plates and bowls with no finish, and few with MO, and a few with the Behlen or General salad bowl finish.

Cups, spoons, and bowls for warm/hot stuff—I ll leave untreated and see how it goes

Also, I ll need to learn what woods shouldn t be used for food/drink applications.

Thanks all for helping me process through it!

- metroplexchl

I forgot to point out that of the two salad bowl finishes I listed Behlen’s goes on a bit thicker and builds faster than Generals otherwise I have found not difference in the final finish. I just wipe them on with a piece of high quality paper towel which can be tossed so there is no clean up.

-- Les B, Oregon

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metroplexchl

66 posts in 143 days


#15 posted 10-09-2017 12:41 AM

perfect. thx

-- What ever you do, be good at it. -Abe Lincoln

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