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Forum topic by Jeffker1 posted 10-08-2017 12:27 AM 1063 views 1 time favorited 45 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Jeffker1

9 posts in 69 days


10-08-2017 12:27 AM

I just bought a Delta shaper for 60 dollars thinking it would work well as a router table. But I read here that the motor isn’t fast enough? I am new to woodworking and am just starting to buy tools that I need. I’m not worried because I know I got a great deal on it. Also, where can I buy the collet that I need to use router bits?


45 replies so far

View TungOil's profile

TungOil

747 posts in 333 days


#1 posted 10-08-2017 12:43 AM

I see them a somewhat different machines. A shaper is generally a much heavier duty machine, useful for things like raising panels, molding, etc. Routers (handheld or in tables) are best suited for smaller profile work like small chamfers, round overs , etc.

Router bits do not work well in shapers because the spindle speeds are generally too slow. My shaper runs at 8,000 or 10,000 rpm, which is suitable for the larger diameter of shaper cutters. Router bits have a much smaller cutting diameter that is more suitable for the higher RPM’s of routers (generally closer to 20,000 to 25,000 RPM).

I would not recommend trying to run router bits in the shaper. just buy a router. You will need one anyway. Craig’s List near me always has at least a dozen router for sale.

-- The optimist says "the glass is half full". The pessimist says "the glass is half empty". The engineer says "the glass is twice as big as it needs to be"

View finns's profile

finns

152 posts in 2954 days


#2 posted 10-08-2017 01:34 AM

+1 on tungoil’s comments. I do have a shaper that is utilized for large cutters I use in production with a power feeder running 5’ boards through. You will be best served with a router and a router table. Keep the shaper though…you never know when it will be needed.

View Kirk650's profile

Kirk650

514 posts in 586 days


#3 posted 10-08-2017 01:57 AM

I have an old Delta Rockwell shaper and a bunch of routers. I get more use from the routers, mostly since I have a bazillion router bits and just 6 or 8 shaper cutters. I always wanted a shaper, and someone finally gave me one. He said it wouldn’t cut, but turned out he had it in reverse. No wonder it wouldn’t cut. I use it for simple cuts mostly. I’m glad to have it.

View sawdustdad's profile

sawdustdad

335 posts in 723 days


#4 posted 10-08-2017 02:06 AM

You can do most things on a shaper that you can do with a router, except maybe dadoes. So you need a router anyway for those. But you can buy shaper cutters at very reasonable prices from Grizzly. I’ve been quite happy with their cutters and I have dozens of them.

-- Murphy's Carpentry Corollary #3: Half of all boards cut to a specific length will be too short.

View bigblockyeti's profile

bigblockyeti

4697 posts in 1558 days


#5 posted 10-08-2017 02:12 AM

Do you have pictures or a model number? I think they did make one at one point in time that used what was essentially a router motor offering the high speed needed for smaller bits unlike the slower speed, higher torque belt drive traditional shaper (larger machines not withstanding).

View JBrow's profile

JBrow

1274 posts in 758 days


#6 posted 10-08-2017 02:41 AM

Jeffker1,

A quick Google search brought me to Woodtek’s website and a Shaper Spindle Router Collet for Delta½” and ¾” Shapers. However I am uncertain whether either will work in your machine…

https://woodworker.com/router-collet-for-delta-hd-2-spd-shaper-mssu-132-315.asp

I initially outfitted the 3 hp. spindle shaper with a router collet and found that at 10,000 rpm, acceptable profiles (smooth cuts with little rippling) were achieved with several light passes. But I suspected that regular use of a variety of router bits in the spindle shaper would ultimately require more tedious hand sanding of profiles to remove ripples that could be occasionally left with slower turning router bits. Therefore, I abandoned the idea, installed the ¾” spindle, and bought the more massive larger diameter shaper cutters and rub collars for curved work.

Also have a hand held router which gets used on most of my projects. I am a hobbyist and thus free of the pros’ demands for the speed and production.

View shipwright's profile

shipwright

7779 posts in 2636 days


#7 posted 10-08-2017 05:50 AM

Just a caution, if you are new to woodworking there is one big difference between shapers and routers.
Shapers are a lot more dangerous. Take nothing lightly with a shaper and always plan carefully before you start it up.

... I guess that goes for about all power tools but shapers can be downright nasty. :-)

-- Paul M ..............If God wanted us to have fiberglass boats he would have given us fibreglass trees. http://thecanadianschooloffrenchmarquetry.com/

View Jeffker1's profile

Jeffker1

9 posts in 69 days


#8 posted 10-08-2017 05:58 AM

This is the Delta wood shaper I bought for $60. Looks almost brand new to me and came with another shaft. I need to research this machine a little more before I break it in.

View jonah's profile

jonah

1467 posts in 3136 days


#9 posted 10-08-2017 12:30 PM

Shapers are really, really dangerous, as shipwright correctly notes. They are more likely to fling workpieces around than a table saw, and with big bits they can chew anything (including fingers) up.

View jar944's profile

jar944

113 posts in 1275 days


#10 posted 10-08-2017 02:40 PM

I personally prefer shapers to router tables in almost all instances. Pick up some shaper cutters and enjoy the shaper

View MrRon's profile

MrRon

4495 posts in 3081 days


#11 posted 10-08-2017 06:19 PM

Shapers are pretty much obsolete except in commercial settings. Routers with variable speeds can spin large moulding bits that were only used on shapers. Shaper cutters are more expensive than router bits. I have one but have never used it. I bought it because it was a bargain.

View Madmark2's profile

Madmark2

373 posts in 426 days


#12 posted 10-08-2017 06:42 PM

Any router / shaper that has grooves cast in the table are a PITA as wood chips will jam up causing feed bumps or jogs in your profile.

M

View Jeffker1's profile

Jeffker1

9 posts in 69 days


#13 posted 10-08-2017 06:49 PM

I was looking at this shaper more closely today, I didn’t have time yesterday. And the thing is almost brand new! There are still parts in the packaging. The table top was a bit Rusty so I sanded it down. I saw that shaper bits are expensive! I also saw router bits with 1/2 inch shanks were not. I’ll probably buy a small set and see how they work.

View jar944's profile

jar944

113 posts in 1275 days


#14 posted 10-08-2017 08:54 PM



Shapers are pretty much obsolete except in commercial settings. Routers with variable speeds can spin large moulding bits that were only used on shapers. Shaper cutters are more expensive than router bits. I have one but have never used it. I bought it because it was a bargain.

- MrRon

I’d argue they are far from obsolete, uncommon in most small home shops yes. As to a router being able to replace a shaper, I would emphatically say not a chance. I use my shapers on almost everything I build. The larger the cutter the better the geometry of the cut as it becomes more tangential to the wood. Cuts that don’t require any sanding are the norm. Routers just can’t compete with a shaper aren’t any sort of significant cut be that overall eigth or depth of cut.

Finally shaper cutters can be cheaper than router bits, if you have a large enough shaper to run a pin knife [euro block] head. I pay $14 for a set of 40mm tall profile knives that last about 1000 lineal feet before needing sharpened.

View Jeffker1's profile

Jeffker1

9 posts in 69 days


#15 posted 10-08-2017 08:57 PM

You lost me at profile knife’s

showing 1 through 15 of 45 replies

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