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Forum topic by GOSSIMER posted 10-07-2017 02:36 PM 261 views 0 times favorited 8 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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GOSSIMER

5 posts in 10 days


10-07-2017 02:36 PM

Topic tags/keywords: cnc software novice

Hi, I’ve been doing woodworking for over 35 years, and I have a fully equipped shop, but this is my first CNC. I had run CAD plotters with 2d XY movements. That was pretty simple, but 3d looks pretty intimidating. I am purchasing an Laguna IQ 4×4 system, but I’m not sure which software I should be going after. It come with VCarve, but it falls short of what I need to build, guitar necks. I was told by them that Rhino 5 is what I need. My question, is there a 3d software that will do what I want, and doesn’t require a background in algebra? Or am I in over my head?


8 replies so far

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bonesbr549

1435 posts in 2845 days


#1 posted 10-07-2017 03:18 PM

I have been at it almost 2 years and it took me about a year to get a decent hang at it.

To me the cutting skills took a lot longer than I anticipated. Learning feeds and speeds and tooling took some time. I’ll highly recommend G-wizzard. Its a great jump starter. You put in parameters and it will get you the feeds speeds and ramp in/out.

2nd, as to 3-d capabilities. So many options you can go, You will find you can do a lot with v’carve pro, I got that with my Cnc routerparts 4×8. I’ve been trying diff ones in demo versions, and all i can say is it will be a learning curve. I’m a computer progammer/IT guy so thought it would be easy, it’s not. Its a lot of time learning but beauty is no matter what you pic, youtube will be your friend. Rhino is very feature rich, but I could not justify the $$.

I got a note that autodesk’s artcam was runnin a special 187$ for a year. It’s based on a monthly subscription. Default is 45/month. I’m just not getting to what I’d call crawling.

I’d suggest you get demo’s and try them. I’d suggest you spend some time learning the cutting aspect first.

I too looked at laguna’s before going cnc routerparts route, so i know they have a lot of demo files you can download, and play with.

Great sites where you can buy a lot of art to use and integrate and get your feet wet so to speak.

Good luck and next you gonna want that plasma…..
cheers

-- Sooner or later Liberals run out of other people's money.

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Desert_Woodworker

1170 posts in 992 days


#2 posted 10-07-2017 03:41 PM

Best of cutting with your CNC. I have the Laguna IQ- I am very satisfied with the machine and support.
You have VCarve Pro- I would think that Aspire 9 would be able to work.

-- Desert_Woodworker

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GOSSIMER

5 posts in 10 days


#3 posted 10-07-2017 04:08 PM

I was afraid the learning curve would be a long and difficult one. At first I thought that VCarve may be able to do what I need, but then Laguna put me in touch with another guitar builder, and he advised me on Rhino software. My hesitation is that his shop is all Laguna tools, though he was very helpful. Now I’m wondering if the Rhino software will allow me to use it 2d until I can handle 3d. Thanks to both of you for your help. G

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MickNM

5 posts in 37 days


#4 posted 10-07-2017 07:05 PM

Good advice here. I’ll echo what others have hinted at – walk before you run. The jump from 2D to true 3D is a big jump. You have a pretty steep learning curve ahead, not only in the software, but primarily in machining wood with a CNC, learning the proper feeds & speeds for the material, as well as fixturing your parts will take a while. I would focus on projects likes designing and making jigs and fixtures and learn to use the machine first. VCarve is much easier software to grasp than Rhino, IMO, and is a great stepping stone to Aspire for 3D.

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Desert_Woodworker

1170 posts in 992 days


#5 posted 10-07-2017 07:28 PM

+1

-- Desert_Woodworker

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bonesbr549

1435 posts in 2845 days


#6 posted 10-07-2017 08:20 PM



Good advice here. I ll echo what others have hinted at – walk before you run. The jump from 2D to true 3D is a big jump. You have a pretty steep learning curve ahead, not only in the software, but primarily in machining wood with a CNC, learning the proper feeds & speeds for the material, as well as fixturing your parts will take a while. I would focus on projects likes designing and making jigs and fixtures and learn to use the machine first. VCarve is much easier software to grasp than Rhino, IMO, and is a great stepping stone to Aspire for 3D.

- MickNM

very true. When I bought mine with vcarve-pro, i got an upgrade to aspire within the year at just the diff. A year in there was nothing i needed that was missing. ....Now I have not added 4th axis yet, but it’s coming.

-- Sooner or later Liberals run out of other people's money.

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GOSSIMER

5 posts in 10 days


#7 posted 10-08-2017 01:00 AM

I think you may be right about hanging on to the VCarve until I can step up to 3d. At least I’ll get use of the machine. Thanks for your input! G.

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oldnovice

6295 posts in 3146 days


#8 posted 10-08-2017 05:02 AM

Nothing to, but to do it … but it’s easier said than done!
I don’t often do this but I have to agree with the comments about Rhino!
The Vectric software is hard to beat!

I haven’t gotten that far with Fusion 360 but my son, a certified CNC machinist/shop manager, has is and is way ahead of me with “our” CNC!

-- "I never met a board I didn't like!"

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