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MAKING NEW SLEDS

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Forum topic by GR8HUNTER posted 10-06-2017 03:50 PM 721 views 0 times favorited 10 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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GR8HUNTER

2966 posts in 551 days


10-06-2017 03:50 PM

Topic tags/keywords: question jig sled

hello all …..I will be making new sleds for TS …BS …..maybe DP…....was thinking of using Dollar store Cutting boards for the runners ….GOOD idea ? BAD idea ? HOW TO Fasten them to PLY ? MDF ? with construction adhesive? or screws? or both? ....OR just buy aluminum t rack ?
THANKS FOR ALL COMMENTS :<))

-- Tony Reinholds,Pa. REMEMBER TO ALWAYS HAVE FUN


10 replies so far

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PPK

870 posts in 648 days


#1 posted 10-06-2017 04:17 PM

I’d countersink and attach with screws if it was me… Actually, I’d probably just use the wood for the fence and not bother with runners… Bit of paste wax makes it more slippery.

-- Pete

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ralbuck

3725 posts in 2105 days


#2 posted 10-06-2017 04:19 PM

There are plastic supply companies around that sell the remnants from all sorts of things.
Nylon should make excellent slides. A little wax rubbed on almost any plastic will make it slippery.
I worked in injection molding for a few ears and learned that just a tiny film of wax or oil makes many plastics as slippery as ice!

Here is an online example. http://www.eplastics.com/?utm_source=bing&utm_medium=cpc&utm_camp

I bought some to use as template from TAP Plastics in WA. Because you asked I found out they are also here about 10 miles from me. We have no sales tax either so it becomes even more economical if I buy here!

Hope this helps.

-- SAWDUST is THERAPY without a couch! just rjR

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Rich

1984 posts in 428 days


#3 posted 10-06-2017 04:40 PM

I’ve seen people use UHMW strips. I’m sure they work well as long as you can fit them properly to your miter slots and attach them securely. One issue is that glue won’t help with that. I also would think you would need to screw them to the sled from underneath. That makes getting everything lined up more difficult.

I keep a piece of pecan that’s been planed down to fit my miter slots. That way I can slice off a 5/16” strip and I know it’ll fit perfectly. I lay pennies down in the slots, drop in the strips and run a thin line of glue. I can then lay the sled base down on it, get it aligned the way I want it and wait for the glue to dry. At that point I drill and countersink for screws. I like to use wax like PPK suggested and if it does get sticky due to humidity it’s pretty easy to see where the rubbing is happening and the corner of a scraper will tune it up nicely.

The runners from Incra and others are nice in that they aren’t affected by weather and are adjustable to fit the slot perfectly. The only thing there is the cost. Besides sleds, I have many jigs and the cost for the metal ones would move into the hundreds of dollars pretty quickly.

-- No matter how much you push the envelope, it'll still be stationery.

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Dutchy

2566 posts in 2007 days


#4 posted 10-06-2017 05:02 PM

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jonah

1471 posts in 3137 days


#5 posted 10-06-2017 05:03 PM

The only thing I’d add to Rich’s excellent post is to use wood glue and CA glue at the same time. The CA glue will hold the runners while the wood glue dries. I just run a short line of wood glue, leave a gap, then another line, etc. The gaps I put a dab of CA glue.

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jonah

1471 posts in 3137 days


#6 posted 10-06-2017 05:05 PM

You can also get 3/4” wide, 3/8” thick aluminum bar stock at any one of a number of places. 3/4” is within a couple thousandths of an inch of the width of my Unisaw’s miter slots. It’s certainly close enough for me.

I got an 8’ length of bar stock from Grainger for something like $15. That’s enough to make probably 6 runners.

View oldnovice's profile

oldnovice

6433 posts in 3206 days


#7 posted 10-06-2017 07:50 PM

If you are going to use a plastic, be careful when mounting the runners with screws as the screws will make the plastic bulge out and change the width and tightening will also rotate the runner and make it an “S” shape.

However, not to poop on the parade, I used steel runners, 3/4” × 3/8” × TBD ground steel stock, typically are stocked items at most steel suppliers. I bought three 18 inch pieces (sled, miter head, and homebred tenoning jig) and with a little work made them all fit.
I did this because I was not happy with my original miter head runner when I first bought my table saw 40+ years ago.

I should have used stainless steel because it has low coefficient of friction with cast iron.
3/4 × 3/8 flat stock is available from and many other sources.

Some aluminum alloys will “gall” on cast iron similar to galling from stainless steel and aluminum because some metals just don’t get along!

-- "I never met a board I didn't like!"

View Dwain's profile

Dwain

478 posts in 3698 days


#8 posted 10-06-2017 08:27 PM



You can also get 3/4” wide, 3/8” thick aluminum bar stock at any one of a number of places. 3/4” is within a couple thousandths of an inch of the width of my Unisaw s miter slots. It s certainly close enough for me.

I got an 8 length of bar stock from Grainger for something like $15. That s enough to make probably 6 runners.

- jonah

I second Johah’s statement. i have used aluminum runners. The great thing is that they never wear out and never bulge. If you can find a nearby metal supply, and your miter’s are common sized, that is a great way to go.

-- When you earnestly believe you can compensate for a lack of skill by doubling your efforts, there is no end to what you CAN'T do

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jonah

1471 posts in 3137 days


#9 posted 10-06-2017 11:59 PM

Also, Grainger doesn’t charge any shipping when you pick stuff up at their stores, so you’re out the door for like $14 for all the sled runner stock you’ll ever need.

I’ve not yet had any problems with galling, but I do think stainless steel sounds like a good idea. If it were easier to obtain long pieces of stainless steel bar stock, I’d definitely go that route. As a point of comparison, McMaster-Carr sells the same size bar in 6ft lengths for $44 and Grainger for $52.

You could go with regular old steel, but that’s both more expensive and harder to work with than aluminum. It’d slide better on the cast iron, but you can solve that problem with regular waxing of the aluminum runners anyway. You also risk rust.

UHMW plastic is a great (and cheap) option, but sadly the shipping charges from McMaster kill that as an realistic option unless you live near NJ. I’ve seen UMHW plastic on Amazon before in the proper 3/8” x 3/4” dimension, but not consistently available with prime shipping. YMMV.

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GR8HUNTER

2966 posts in 551 days


#10 posted 10-07-2017 01:09 AM

so grainger has it cool thanks a lot all think I will go with the alum.:<))

-- Tony Reinholds,Pa. REMEMBER TO ALWAYS HAVE FUN

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