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Flattening Rough Board with only Low Angle Jack?

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Forum topic by mike12ophone posted 10-06-2017 12:44 PM 1867 views 0 times favorited 26 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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mike12ophone

37 posts in 630 days


10-06-2017 12:44 PM

I’m sure this has been addressed before but my Google skills are failing me right now.

I see a gang of videos on how to flatten board with a bench full of planes but I have only the #62 (I think) low angle Jack. I’ve got 1 blade 25¹/30² deg bevels and an adjustable mouth. Im sure it’ll be much slower but would this accomplish what I need? I suppose I’m open to another blade that I can scallop more aggressively but I’m seeing if I can accomplish this with what I have before I start breaking my budget with more stuff. The faces dont need to be dead flat for joinery or anything and Ill be using a random orbit sander for cleanup

BACKSTORY:
I need 3 roughly 13” x 12” panels for drawer fronts but have no access to jointer or planer (or even a router). I could buy S4S walnut from woodcraft but the price to make these panels would be much more than just getting it in the rough from my lumber dealer. They would mill it but the cost is more than just going to Woodcraft.

Process:
- Buy rough lumber 3/4 or 4/4
- Crosscut to length Circ Saw
- Flatten 1 face & 1 edge – Jack Plane
- Rip to 3” or 4” on TS
- Resaw to ¾” on TS (no bandsaw)
- Flatten & dimension S6S – Jack Plane

-- - just a man with too many hobbies


26 replies so far

View Derek Cohen's profile

Derek Cohen

346 posts in 3749 days


#1 posted 10-06-2017 01:36 PM

Mike

You will need a second blade with an 8” camber …

Then you can hog off thick shavings ..

When you do so, plane either across the grain or diagnonally to it. Then you will not need to be concerned about tearout, and can use a 25 degree bevel.

The alternative to this is to purchase a cheap Stanley #5, and camber the blade on that.

Regards from Perth

Derek

-- Buildiing furniture, and reviewing and building tools at http://www.inthewoodshop.com

View Galootinator's profile

Galootinator

40 posts in 17 days


#2 posted 10-06-2017 01:52 PM

I’m sure there are several techniques that different folks would suggest. I will explain how I would approach a job like this, and let others add to it if they have a different approach.

I would bench dog the drawer front being worked to my work bench. I would then place a winding stick or straight edge at each end of the face of the board, to visually see if there is any twist.

If flat, I would plane across the grain at an angle to minimize tearout, orienting my plane basically corner to corner. The mouth of your plane will affect how aggressively you can go about this…as you don’t want wood to jam in your plane.

If the panel is not flat, I would use the same across the grain technique, but working the high corners of the twist, that I previously established with the winding sticks. After each pass on the opposing high corners, your board will be more flat and true than the previous pass. I would keep doing this…checking on progress with the sticks until the face is completely flat. Once flat, this would be my reference face for the other three sides of the board.

I know this can be done with a low angle plane…I recently flattened a twisted and cupped piece of spalted maple that was 4’ long and 10” wide, with only a low angle block plane.

I hope this helps

-- I've never been accused of withholding my opinion ;)-- Walter M. ~ Missouri

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Galootinator

40 posts in 17 days


#3 posted 10-06-2017 01:54 PM

Sorry about any duplicate info Derek, you must have posted while I was writing my response. Lol

-- I've never been accused of withholding my opinion ;)-- Walter M. ~ Missouri

View mike12ophone's profile

mike12ophone

37 posts in 630 days


#4 posted 10-06-2017 02:59 PM

Awesome, thanks for all the info. I’m going to give it a go.

-- - just a man with too many hobbies

View waho6o9's profile

waho6o9

7981 posts in 2358 days


#5 posted 10-06-2017 03:23 PM

Off the inter webs.

Winding sticks may be of assistance:

View ColonelTravis's profile

ColonelTravis

1593 posts in 1675 days


#6 posted 10-06-2017 03:51 PM

I have no power planer or jointer, flatten everything by hand after getting it close with a bandsaw. I bought a toothed blade for my LN 62, it works great for milling and the ghastly tearout you can get from the normal blade is practically eliminated. You still can rough up the sides, so make sure your boards are wider than you need.

When I first got my LA Jack I tried flattening boards with the regular blade, didn’t get the job done fast enough for me, or I got tearout. I leave the regular blade for shooting and edge jointing every now and then. But the toothed blade is great for flattening, I can’t say enough good things about it. In no time, a board cleans up nicely with a #8 and #4 or just a #4.

If you’re gonna mill by hand, you should consider a toothed blade. Before I got mine I was dreading taking off, say, 1/8” off an entire board face. Not any more.

View Derek Cohen's profile

Derek Cohen

346 posts in 3749 days


#7 posted 10-06-2017 04:09 PM

A toothed blade is useful to remove waste and prevent tearout. However, it is very slow, and it is not the plane of choice when hogging away twists and unevenness. It is better suited to a board off a bandsaw, and not rough sawn. For the latter, one uses a jack plane with a cambered blade. My preference for this task, in order, is a woodie, then a #5, and lastly a LA Jack – all with cambered blades.

Regards from Perth

Derek

-- Buildiing furniture, and reviewing and building tools at http://www.inthewoodshop.com

View mike12ophone's profile

mike12ophone

37 posts in 630 days


#8 posted 10-06-2017 04:39 PM

Hmm so say I don’t use a cambered or toothed blade. Is there anything I can do that patience and sandpaper can’t fix (assuming my technique is on)?

-- - just a man with too many hobbies

View Loren's profile

Loren

9423 posts in 3429 days


#9 posted 10-06-2017 04:44 PM

If you don’t take measures to control tearout
you’ll have to do a lot more scraping and
sanding. The edges of the iron will leave
marks on the wood if you don’t have them
at least dubbed off.

View bandit571's profile

bandit571

18189 posts in 2464 days


#10 posted 10-06-2017 04:54 PM

Stanley No. 5c, cambered iron ($20, maybe)
Followed by a smoother..

Stanley No. 4 ( $8-$12)....

-- A Planer? I'M the planer, this is what I use

View Rick_M's profile

Rick_M

10256 posts in 2161 days


#11 posted 10-06-2017 04:59 PM

I don’t know if it was said but edge joint and glue up the boards before trying to flatten them. Take your time orienting grain the same way (if possible) to help reduce tearout when you doing your final smoothing.

-- http://thewoodknack.blogspot.com/

View mike12ophone's profile

mike12ophone

37 posts in 630 days


#12 posted 10-06-2017 05:08 PM

Bandit, im guessing you are throwing out prices you paid for those. Congrats, looks like you got a good deal there. I’m trying not to spend any more money. Plus this is a hobby for me and the tools are a big part of it for me. I’m not ready to get into reconditioning the old timers since it’s one more variable in getting good results.

Otherwise, this is really helpful. Should I flatten one reference face for each part before I glue? Then thickness and flatten after the panel is together?

-- - just a man with too many hobbies

View Arlin Eastman's profile

Arlin Eastman

3950 posts in 2342 days


#13 posted 10-06-2017 05:16 PM

If the wood is really really rough you can use a scrub plane first and then do it Derek’s and Bandits way

-- Please help me help other Vets click..> http://www.gofundme.com/m1abko.....It is always the right time, to do the right thing.

View Derek Cohen's profile

Derek Cohen

346 posts in 3749 days


#14 posted 10-06-2017 05:17 PM



Hmm so say I don t use a cambered or toothed blade. Is there anything I can do that patience and sandpaper can t fix (assuming my technique is on)?

- mike12ophone

Sure, go ahead with sandpaper …. if you don’t mind the gross inefficiency of the method, have LOTS of time on your hands, and enjoy breathing in dust!

Regards from Perth

Derek

-- Buildiing furniture, and reviewing and building tools at http://www.inthewoodshop.com

View Loren's profile

Loren

9423 posts in 3429 days


#15 posted 10-06-2017 05:17 PM

I would roughly plane both faces and mark
them with a yellow or white pencil to indicate
which direction planing produced a smoother
surface. Chalk works too.

From there you can rip some rough edges and
clamp them up to see if they’re going to go
together flat enough to make one panel to
cut your parts from. If not, you may have
to remove some twist from one or more.
Of course the glue joints will come out nicer
if you hand plane them.

showing 1 through 15 of 26 replies

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