LumberJocks

How long before resaw pieces stabilize?

  • Advertise with us

« back to Woodworking Skill Share forum

Forum topic by Andybb posted 10-05-2017 11:40 PM 677 views 0 times favorited 17 replies Add to Favorites Watch
View Andybb's profile

Andybb

547 posts in 438 days


10-05-2017 11:40 PM

I re-sawed some spalted maple yesterday from slabs that had been drying for 2 years before I got it. A couple of months ago I did the same and I didn’t sticker it and a few days later it was warped. Knowing now that the general rule of thumb is that anything re-sawn to half of its thickness will warp I am wondering how long it might take to stabilize. I read this via AlaskaGuy and this from other forum topics but am still unsure.

They are re-sawed and planed to 1/2 and 9/16” for making bookmatched panels/jewelry boxes etc.

-- Andybb - GO HAWKS!


17 replies so far

View TheFridge's profile

TheFridge

8287 posts in 1321 days


#1 posted 10-07-2017 01:32 AM

I either sticker it or use it after any milling close to final.

-- Shooting down the walls of heartache. Bang bang. I am. The warrior.

View Andybb's profile

Andybb

547 posts in 438 days


#2 posted 10-07-2017 02:05 AM

Thanks. I probably milled them too close to final just to save time when I get time to make something so they are kinda in “pre-project mode.” I’ll keep them stickered until it’s project. time I was hoping they would be closer to 5/8” but they are closer to 9/16 and 1/2”.

-- Andybb - GO HAWKS!

View TheFridge's profile

TheFridge

8287 posts in 1321 days


#3 posted 10-07-2017 02:31 AM

No problem. i generally try to make sure it has airflow on both sides from final milling to finish stages so it doesn’t warp because of moisture. Even when it does I usually sticker or stand on end (into the case of a glued up panel) and it’ll behave most of the time.

-- Shooting down the walls of heartache. Bang bang. I am. The warrior.

View Andybb's profile

Andybb

547 posts in 438 days


#4 posted 10-07-2017 02:37 AM

It would be cool to be able to see the internal stresses going on in a piece of wood.

-- Andybb - GO HAWKS!

View Rich's profile

Rich

1977 posts in 424 days


#5 posted 10-07-2017 04:21 AM



It would be cool to be able to see the internal stresses going on in a piece of wood.

- Andybb

They used to say that Dale Earnhardt could see the air in the draft and that was why he dominated on the super speedways.

Not sure what that has to do with anything, but one thing I try to do is minimize the time between the final milling and the joinery. Unless the wood is really going to twist, it seems that locking it in helps keep it from moving.

Charles Neil says it’s easier to keep it from moving than to straighten it out after the fact (I’m paraphrasing).

-- No matter how much you push the envelope, it'll still be stationery.

View ArtMann's profile

ArtMann

683 posts in 651 days


#6 posted 10-07-2017 02:26 PM

I don’t want to be too pessimistic but you are trying to straighten cupped lumber and the success rate of that is not very good. Even if you can force it flat with heavy weights or clamps, it will often cup again with changes in humidity.

View Rich's profile

Rich

1977 posts in 424 days


#7 posted 10-07-2017 02:49 PM


I don t want to be too pessimistic but you are trying to straighten cupped lumber and the success rate of that is not very good. Even if you can force it flat with heavy weights or clamps, it will often cup again with changes in humidity.

- ArtMann

According to his OP, the warped boards were from a couple of months ago. Having experienced that, Andy is asking how best to keep the most recent pieces he re-sawed from doing the same. That’s why I mentioned Charles’ comment that it’s easier to keep it from moving than to straighten it out once it has.

I should point out that my previous post was referring to what I do after the final milling, but that doesn’t happen until it’s been stickered for at least a week. I like to use pallet wrap when I sticker it. Weights are OK but the pallet wrap locks the bundle tight and you can move the bundle out of the way. It’s also easy to apply even pressure at various spots on the boards. I keep 2” and 5” wide rolls so I can wrap various sizes of boards and still leave space between them for air to move.

-- No matter how much you push the envelope, it'll still be stationery.

View Andybb's profile

Andybb

547 posts in 438 days


#8 posted 10-08-2017 03:21 AM

They used to say that Dale Earnhardt could see the air in the draft and that was why he dominated on the super speedways.

- Rich

That would be a true “Wood Whisperer”!

I like the idea of the pallet wrap. Wrap it up and put it on a shelf until needed.

-- Andybb - GO HAWKS!

View Rich's profile

Rich

1977 posts in 424 days


#9 posted 10-08-2017 03:52 AM


I like the idea of the pallet wrap. Wrap it up and put it on a shelf until needed.

- Andybb

Yes, and you can move it into its final environment if it’s some furniture for the house. Here in AZ, the inside versus outside temp and humidity are two totally different things most of the year. If it’s a piece for the interior, I like to let it acclimate indoors. Maybe I’m being too anal, but so far it has worked.

-- No matter how much you push the envelope, it'll still be stationery.

View rwe2156's profile

rwe2156

2710 posts in 1315 days


#10 posted 10-08-2017 02:09 PM

Andy,
Equilibration time depends on several factors, type of wood, the way it’s sawn, thickness, and environment to name a few. For exampl, 1/4 sawn is less prone to cupping, thicker slabs more prone. For 1/2” thick panels, I would keep them stickered for a week between millings. Be careful to keep the wetter (inner) side up and if possible keep in a climate controlled room. Keep them thick and do not remove more than 1/32” each side per milling.

That being said, I would like to mention the importance of once flat, KEEPING them flat. Once the project is under way, always “put the panels to bed” at the end of the day, so to speak. Left overnight on a table top or just an hour under a fan you may be looking at a potato chip.

Storage is crucial. Once equilibrated, never store panels in an uncontrolled open shop environment. I like to either store them in a plastic bag or keep stickered in a climate controlled room.

Always keep in mind where you build it and where it will live. If those tow environments are very different you have to take this into account, For example, it may be flat when you build it, but a warped door could be the result.

As mentioned panels can warp due to stresses released during sawing, especially in gnarly grained wood. In these cases it may be necessary to rip into strips and reglue (see Charles Neil’s video “Uncup the Cup”).

-- Everything is a prototype thats why its one of a kind!!

View Andybb's profile

Andybb

547 posts in 438 days


#11 posted 10-08-2017 06:33 PM

Thanks everybody.

As stated above, better to prevent than try to correct.

Saw this too as a way to correct a slight cup in smaller pieces. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jWDQGhLv-_k&t=14s . Seems like wood likes to cup in the direction of the exposed face as it releases moisture.

-- Andybb - GO HAWKS!

View TheFridge's profile

TheFridge

8287 posts in 1321 days


#12 posted 10-08-2017 06:41 PM

Yep.

-- Shooting down the walls of heartache. Bang bang. I am. The warrior.

View Andybb's profile

Andybb

547 posts in 438 days


#13 posted 10-08-2017 07:52 PM

And yet another cool technique. He calls it the “Frankenstein” method as it corrects cup and twist. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cUqjC7E8u44

-- Andybb - GO HAWKS!

View ArtMann's profile

ArtMann

683 posts in 651 days


#14 posted 10-08-2017 08:10 PM

I wouldn’t even think of selling someone a table top that had been hacket up like that.

View Andybb's profile

Andybb

547 posts in 438 days


#15 posted 10-08-2017 08:31 PM


I wouldn t even think of selling someone a table top that had been hacket up like that.

- ArtMann


Maybe not, but if you took the time to fill all the cuts with splines of the same wood or epoxy and plane it it could work, especially if it was rare, exotic, expensive or the clients wood. I’m imagining some big thick hardwood boards found in a barn.

-- Andybb - GO HAWKS!

showing 1 through 15 of 17 replies

Have your say...

You must be signed in to reply.

DISCLAIMER: Any posts on LJ are posted by individuals acting in their own right and do not necessarily reflect the views of LJ. LJ will not be held liable for the actions of any user.

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

HomeRefurbers.com