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Forum topic by MrFid posted 10-05-2017 11:17 AM 683 views 0 times favorited 30 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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MrFid

848 posts in 1685 days


10-05-2017 11:17 AM

Topic tags/keywords: question

Hi all.

My car was recently totaled (hit from behind) in an accident. It was not a great car, so in a way it is nice to be able to get market value for it and put that money towards a new vehicle.

My question to you all is what car/truck you’ve found works well for moving lumber efficiently. I am tired of sticking wood out the car window to get it home, or strapping it to the top of the car. I typically make furniture, and buy my lumber as rough stock. I also do a good bit of scrounging for free wood. Not normally buying sheet goods in great quantity but on occasion it’s happened.

Other concerns: I have two kids who are small enough to still need car seats, so if I go the pickup truck route I’m probably going to need a second row of seats to install those.

Any thoughts? I appreciate it!

-- Bailey F - Eastern Mass.


30 replies so far

View bigblockyeti's profile

bigblockyeti

4549 posts in 1501 days


#1 posted 10-05-2017 11:56 AM

A small crew cab truck would be a good bet, one with the biggest bed available will allow you to still be able to use it as a truck vs. some of the $50K+ “trucks” with a cab having the interior volume of a suburban and a bed that will fit only two bags of mulch from your favorite mega lo mart.

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Sparks500

70 posts in 111 days


#2 posted 10-05-2017 12:27 PM

This is what I got for my retirement gift to myself. pretty flexible, but don’t expect great mileage…

-- Rockhound: You realize we're sitting on 45,000 pounds of fuel, one nuclear warhead and a thing that has 270,000 moving parts built by the lowest bidder? Makes you feel good doesn't it?

View a1Jim's profile

a1Jim

116312 posts in 3358 days


#3 posted 10-05-2017 12:55 PM

As a long-term contractor/woodshop owner, I can’t Imagine not having a pickup truck with a lumber rack.Sine you will be using yours for the family too I doubt your going to want a lumber rack but if your going to be hauling lots of lumber a pickup with an 8ft bed is great for hauling material trucks with 6ft beds are better than no truck smaller than that your not going to be able to haul much lumber. I’ve never seen how a chevy like “Sparks500” converts but if it will haul 8ft material than that may work for you too.

-- http://artisticwoodstudio.com Custom furniture

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Gene Howe

9549 posts in 3209 days


#4 posted 10-05-2017 01:38 PM

If you’re hauling a family, a dual cab with an 8’ would do the trick. But, they are monsters to park and most are gas hogs. A cheaper alternative would be an SUV with a towing pkg. And a light/medium duty trailer.

-- Gene 'The true soldier fights not because he hates what is in front of him, but because he loves what is behind him.' G. K. Chesterton

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MrFid

848 posts in 1685 days


#5 posted 10-05-2017 01:38 PM

Thanks for all the insight folks. I agree that I’m looking for something that has a good sized bed in the back. I’ve just been looking at trucks while driving around, and it seems like some of them have beds that are next to useless. Does anyone have insight into options for safe, convenient lumber (and occasional sheet good) hauling that aren’t a truck? Thinking in terms of a roof rack or something…. I’ve had a roof rack on a car before for bikes, but haven’t had one since I started woodworking.

-- Bailey F - Eastern Mass.

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JCamp

416 posts in 331 days


#6 posted 10-05-2017 01:40 PM

For the past 6 years Ive had a 2002 Ext cab chevy 1500 4×4 and have hauled about everything with it since I’ve constantly built stuff and moved twice. It does pretty good. A few years back I built a 10×16 foot deck and put every piece of lumber for that deck in the back of my truck and hauled it the hour back to my house. It was more than it wanted to handle but it did the job.. I use to own a 03 Toyota Tundra that was a great running machine till I wrecked it. My father in law owns a Honda Ridgeline and personally I don’t consider it to be a “Truck” but the gas mileage and ride is great and the tailgate opens a couple different ways and there is a dry box in the bottom of the bed that would be great for hauling tools or camping.
Anything extended cab is gonna be tight with a car seat or two. Since I have two kids when I go to replace my truck I will likely get something will full 4 doors and a small bed like the Ridgeline and then get a 5×10 trailer. My wife has a Tahoe and loves it. Plenty of room inside but wouldn’t be much for hauling stuff unless you have a trailer then the big V8 will pull anything you’d want to.
Anymore I personally like the idea of getting whatever I want to ride around in and still being able to get a few boards but then having a trailer for any big hauls

-- Whatsoever thy hand findeth to do, do it with all thy might

View isotope's profile

isotope

161 posts in 1405 days


#7 posted 10-05-2017 01:56 PM

Assuming that you need a family vehicle first that can occasionally be used for hauling lumber, I would seriously explore the idea of just installing a hitch on your vehicle and using a trailer. The other option is a van that has seats which can fold down into the floor. My dad has a Dodge van that can fit 4’ x 8’ sheetgoods completely inside the vehicle. We often load it with 10+ sheets of drywall.

But, if you do lots of hauling, then I too think a pickup would be the way to go.

View bigblockyeti's profile

bigblockyeti

4549 posts in 1501 days


#8 posted 10-05-2017 02:02 PM


Thanks for all the insight folks. I agree that I m looking for something that has a good sized bed in the back. I ve just been looking at trucks while driving around, and it seems like some of them have beds that are next to useless. Does anyone have insight into options for safe, convenient lumber (and occasional sheet good) hauling that aren t a truck? Thinking in terms of a roof rack or something…. I ve had a roof rack on a car before for bikes, but haven t had one since I started woodworking.

- MrFid

A folding harbor freight 4’ x 8’ trailer and a 4 cylinder SUV (that can tow ~2500lbs.) would offer good mileage, good ride quality, substantial lumber volume and OK payload. That’s exactly what my brother does and the market is flush with many new options in the $20K – $25K range or less if you’re OK with buying used.

View jmartel's profile

jmartel

7396 posts in 1931 days


#9 posted 10-05-2017 02:09 PM

Buy a trailer. The HF one mentioned above is $260 with a coupon. I’ve been using a Subaru Forester and can fit 9’ lumber in there with the front passenger seat folded down. Hauls a lot more than I’ve expected to. My trailer is being put together this week so it will be easier in the future to haul.

-- The quality of one's woodworking is directly related to the amount of flannel worn.

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MrFid

848 posts in 1685 days


#10 posted 10-05-2017 03:16 PM

Thanks again everyone!

@jmartel and @bigblockyeti I am definitely considering the trailer option since I really do need a family vehicle first (and am not thrilled with poor gas mileage although that’s a secondary concern for sure). Do either of you have a link or an item number for the HF 4×8 trailer? I haven’t been able to find it on the site. That sounds like it might be a terrific option for me.

I started this thread leaning towards a truck, but now I think I might try to find something with towing capacity and a trailer.

Also, totally okay with buying used. In fact it’s maybe preferable with me.

Would love to find out more about the HF trailer.

-- Bailey F - Eastern Mass.

View bigblockyeti's profile

bigblockyeti

4549 posts in 1501 days


#11 posted 10-05-2017 04:25 PM

The item number is 62648 and for some reason isn’t being shown on the webpage. It has a near cult following with the many different ways folks have modded it. For a little more money you can get the non-folding 4’ x 8” trailer that has a higher weight capacity.

View Steve Peterson's profile

Steve Peterson

358 posts in 2863 days


#12 posted 10-05-2017 05:14 PM

I am glad several folks chimed in with suggestions to buy a trailer. It makes a lot of sense if you only expect to haul sheet goods on rare occasions.

One really nice feature is folding rear seats in a car. This gives you the ability to carry a dozen 8’ 2×4s when you don’t have the trailer with you. It is amazing how much more space it gives an average size car.

-- Steve

View JCamp's profile

JCamp

416 posts in 331 days


#13 posted 10-05-2017 05:24 PM

Honda CRVs will pull around 2500 lbs and still get around 28 MPG. A real nice trailer will be under $1000 for the size you need. Much cheaper than having both a family vehicle and a truck to haul stuff. Most will have a factor roof haul system of some kinds that you can haul a small amount of lumber on

-- Whatsoever thy hand findeth to do, do it with all thy might

View LittleShaver's profile

LittleShaver

179 posts in 400 days


#14 posted 10-05-2017 05:34 PM

My wife drives a Ridgeline and loves it. Around 20 mpg without being careful. Fit two car seats when the grand kids came to visit without a problem. This is our traveling vehicle. Handles great on long trips and you can’t beat the below the bed trunk for keeping things safe and out of sight. Wife keeps a large cooler in it for bringing home groceries during the hot summer months.

For small amounts of long wood, the rear window opens and a 12 footer will fit inside.
Will also pull a trailer for larger loads of lumber.

-- Sawdust Maker

View Lazyman's profile

Lazyman

1240 posts in 1168 days


#15 posted 10-05-2017 06:37 PM

I’ve got a 2002 Honda Odyssey minivan that allows me to carry a couple of full 4×8 sheets of plywood if I take the middle row seats out and fold down the rear seat into the floor. It only takes a few seconds to remove or install the seats. I can also put a few 10’ 2×6 boards down the center. I kept it rather than trading it in a few years back specifically because of this capability. Unfortunately, I am NOT able to load 60 inch baltic plywood inside but it does have a roof rack so for short trips that works well enough. It has 160k+ miles on it and have never even had it in the shop except for scheduled maintenance (brakes, oil changes, etc.). I expect to get another 50k on it at least.

It was a great family vehicle when my kids were young and now it is used to haul stuff around. I would buy another one in a heartbeat.

-- Nathan, TX -- Hire the lazy man. He may not do as much work but that's because he will find a better way.

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