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Breaking Bandsaw Blades

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Forum topic by BillyDoubleU posted 10-04-2017 10:34 PM 462 views 0 times favorited 11 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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BillyDoubleU

152 posts in 280 days


10-04-2017 10:34 PM

Grizzly G0555LX

Speed is set for 3100 FPM

Laguna Proforce 93 1/2”, 1/2” 3tpi hook, both broke in the gullet.

Both new blades. Resawing 4/4 strips in half about 4”s long then roughing out pistol grips.

Then I got some Bosch blades and put in a 1/4” 6tpi blade and it ended up breaking in the gullet also. I was roughing out pistol grips for 1911’s. So the only curve is the shallow round on the top. After that one broke I checked the bearings and what I thought was a well spaced lower thrust bearing was actually a nicely seized lower thrust bearing.

I got it working again and was able to finish up cutting what I needed to cut and don’t have anymore to do for a bit. So I ended up ordering a Carter guide bearing upgrade kit and figured I might as well pick up a stabilizer as well…

Set up the Snodgrass way.

I think the Laguna blades broke from cutting the round along with crap guide/thrust bearings. My lower guide bearing were seized when they 1/2” blade broke…

So I really don’t think I have it over tensioned.

List of stuff I found that might be the cause:
-Bad bearing- multiple seized bearing at this point
-Feed pressure too high? I feel like I am not forcing it but letting it take the stock as it wants.
-Running time too long? I was resawing 6’ 4/4 boards. Not as single long boards but cut into 4 1/2” blocks, then roughed out to pistol grips, cut and resawn as such. Then after resawn cut excess stock off.
-Too tight a radius on cutting the rounds?
-Wheels look in line, take a straight edge to it?

Even when tensioned and all the blade looks like it “moves” in and out on the wheel if only a 1/16” – 1/32nd”. Enough to notice but very minimal.

Last, Something on the lower wheel may be rubbing? I hear a slight rub on it only at a certain part of the rotation. Very mild but nonetheless.

Any ideas?

I am hoping the Carter products do the trick.

I want to cut a reindeer :)

-- "But I’ve bought a big bat. I’m all ready you see. Now my troubles are going to have troubles with me!” ~ Dr. Seuss


11 replies so far

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Loren

9633 posts in 3486 days


#1 posted 10-04-2017 10:55 PM

Work hardening maybe.

I have an INCA 710. I solder up my own
blades from coil stock I buy on ebay. It’s
probably too thick for my saw’s three 10”
wheels. The 1/4” blades get work hardened
and break before they get dull.

I save a lot of money making my own blades,
but sometimes I miss the old 20” Delta
band saw I had. I think the blades would
have lasted longer on it.

I’m assuming you’re de-tensioning when the
saw is not it use.

You can repair blades with a soldering kit. That’s
what I bought mine for originally.

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BillyDoubleU

152 posts in 280 days


#2 posted 10-04-2017 11:10 PM

Yes always detension.

-- "But I’ve bought a big bat. I’m all ready you see. Now my troubles are going to have troubles with me!” ~ Dr. Seuss

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MrUnix

6010 posts in 2037 days


#3 posted 10-04-2017 11:52 PM

Did it break front to back or back to front… if back to front, most likely the frozen thrust bearing.

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - In Dog I trust... everything else is questionable

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BillyDoubleU

152 posts in 280 days


#4 posted 10-05-2017 12:14 AM



Did it break front to back or back to front… if back to front, most likely the frozen thrust bearing.

Cheers,
Brad

- MrUnix

Front to back in the gullet.

-- "But I’ve bought a big bat. I’m all ready you see. Now my troubles are going to have troubles with me!” ~ Dr. Seuss

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MrUnix

6010 posts in 2037 days


#5 posted 10-05-2017 12:31 AM

Front to back in the gullet.
- BillyDoubleU

So the break at the gullet was discolored/distorted and the break at the back of the blade was clean steel… that usually indicates a stress break – such as forcing the cut, too fast a rate of feed or too much tension (or a combination of them). The bad thrust bearing could have played a part as well, but usually that will cause a back to front break. Replace your thrust bearings at the very least… IMO, those carter guides (not the stabilizer) are a waste of money (see this article for a good review).

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - In Dog I trust... everything else is questionable

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BillyDoubleU

152 posts in 280 days


#6 posted 10-05-2017 12:52 AM

Actually as far as I could tell on all the breaks there was no discoloration. All front to back. Before each break the blade would start jumping into the wood at the crack spot would bow out.

I believe each time either the lower guide bearins or thrust bearing was seized.

I got it working again today and got in another hour of work to finish up and the lower thrust bearing was seized again.

I’ve read good reviews on the carter guides. If anything it’s worth having a proper facing thrust bearing. Never understood why they have the face of the the bearing making contact.

-- "But I’ve bought a big bat. I’m all ready you see. Now my troubles are going to have troubles with me!” ~ Dr. Seuss

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MrUnix

6010 posts in 2037 days


#7 posted 10-05-2017 03:07 AM

If anything it’s worth having a proper facing thrust bearing. Never understood why they have the face of the the bearing making contact.
- BillyDoubleU

Ah, the question of the century :)
You might like this video by Matthias (over at woodgears.ca) and his experiments regarding the orientation and guide design for his homemade bandsaws…

Blade guide design issues by Matthias Wandel

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - In Dog I trust... everything else is questionable

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BillyDoubleU

152 posts in 280 days


#8 posted 10-05-2017 03:40 AM

Saw that guy earlier oddly enough. Interesting fellow.

Either way, I wear ear pro when cutting ;)

-- "But I’ve bought a big bat. I’m all ready you see. Now my troubles are going to have troubles with me!” ~ Dr. Seuss

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BillyDoubleU

152 posts in 280 days


#9 posted 10-05-2017 12:57 PM



Work hardening maybe.

The 1/4” blades get work hardened
and break before they get dull.

- Loren

This is interesting and may be a leading cause I saw this mentioned a few other places. Since these blades have been breaking after high continuous use that’s plausible.

Oddly the stock Grizzly 3/8” blade was dull as could be and was literally burning through some mahogany blocks I was resawing then doing the same rough cutting and never broke.

Maybe I’m just all around abusing the blades expecting too much out of them. Still think the frozen bearing are playing a roll.

-- "But I’ve bought a big bat. I’m all ready you see. Now my troubles are going to have troubles with me!” ~ Dr. Seuss

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MrRon

4496 posts in 3082 days


#10 posted 10-06-2017 09:51 PM

I would use top brand blades from Lenox, Timberwolf or Starrett. Blades that are supplied with a new saw are usually junk.

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MrRon

4496 posts in 3082 days


#11 posted 10-09-2017 06:41 PM

I think maybe you are forcing the cut too aggressively, especially with a thin 1/4” blade. That same aggression may also be the reason for the bearing to freeze.

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