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Douglas Fir, Is it treated?

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Forum topic by CovenantCreations posted 1266 days ago 779 views 0 times favorited 9 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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CovenantCreations

127 posts in 1498 days


1266 days ago

I have a bunch of T&G Doug fir that I salvaged from an old cattle barn. I want to know if it is treated and if its safe for use on indoor projects, such as flooring, and countertop. I has a very faint smell of creosote, not near what ive smelled on some other wood Ive worked with that was treated. Is there a for sure way to tell if it is safe?

Heres a close up

Heres a board with heartwood/softwood contrast


9 replies so far

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TopamaxSurvivor

14579 posts in 2271 days


#1 posted 1266 days ago

If it has that smell it wil always have it. Trust your nose.

-- "some old things are lovely, warm still with life ... of the forgotten men who made them." - D.H. Lawrence

View lilredweldingrod's profile

lilredweldingrod

2495 posts in 1702 days


#2 posted 1265 days ago

Was it a pole barn? The T&G may not have been treated but may have leeched over from the frame work. I would be careful about indoor use. Rand

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cabmaker

1282 posts in 1404 days


#3 posted 1265 days ago

If that for sure came from a cattle barn I dont think I would consider it for anything other than maybe ext. deck or storage bldg. flooring. It will be loaded with years of urine, etc. Run it through the planer and you ll see what I mean. Good luck with it !

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TopamaxSurvivor

14579 posts in 2271 days


#4 posted 1265 days ago

Anything you bring indoors needs to be odor free. Lots of people have very sensitive noses. A friend of mine told me his wife could smell a mouse fart next door!!

-- "some old things are lovely, warm still with life ... of the forgotten men who made them." - D.H. Lawrence

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CovenantCreations

127 posts in 1498 days


#5 posted 1264 days ago

I have planed a bunch of boards, and it really didn’t smell that bad, and since they are in such good shape, and I went through the hassle of saving them, I think I will use them for some sort of outdoor project this summer. Thanks for any advice given here .

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jackass

350 posts in 2308 days


#6 posted 1264 days ago

In my travels as a Realtor I recall when old barn boards were the decorative product to have. The house in question had bathroom cupboards and vanity made from unfinished barn boards. When you entered the bathroom you could smell a hint of cow manure, at that point the house was about 5 years old. Most offensive. I can’t imagine what it would have been like on a damp day. Be careful using used lumber inside living space, you may have to do your work twice. You have to remember the boards have had many many years to absorb the odours of what was in the barn, be it cows, pigs, or just hay.
Jack

-- Jack Keefe Shediac NB Canada

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canadianchips

1831 posts in 1592 days


#7 posted 1264 days ago

If they were salvaged from the loft area they may clean up quite nice. (I grew up on a farm, the smell wouldn’t affect me the way it does others. We had a local landscape supplier that ran his business out of an old barn. Beautifully finished inside and out. Some “city folk” wouldn’t even walk in the front door. Their loss ! Then they would go sit in the car and wait, DOGS and Cats all over them ! (Enjoying their cigarrette in the car ) GO FIGURE.

-- "My mission in life - make everyone smile !"

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dbray45

2482 posts in 1372 days


#8 posted 1264 days ago

Jack makes a good point, especially if you were to use these boards for a kitchen counter. Whenever you make changes on the inside of a house, keep the resale value in mind.

-- David in Damascus, MD

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TopamaxSurvivor

14579 posts in 2271 days


#9 posted 1263 days ago

Fresh cut alfalfa smells awesome, but when it is dry it does not!! Presonally, I would seal any barn wood permamently.

-- "some old things are lovely, warm still with life ... of the forgotten men who made them." - D.H. Lawrence

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