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Forum topic by bladedust posted 10-04-2017 01:28 AM 495 views 0 times favorited 11 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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bladedust

197 posts in 2049 days


10-04-2017 01:28 AM

Topic tags/keywords: question

First let me apologize in advance if I’m not posting in the right forum. I’ve been a member for a long time and thoroughly enjoy all the knowledge I’ve gained (I am in awe of the craftsmanship and artistry displayed here) through this site, but this is my first post…ever.

So here goes; I bought a Grizzly G1183 sander a couple of years ago from a gentleman no longer woodworking. When transporting it, I picked it up from the wrong spot and broke the table trunnions. Two years later (shows you how often i get into the shop), I’m getting ready to put it to use.

Any ideas how i can put these trunnions back together? it was a clean break, but these things look like they’re made out of pot metal. Any help would be appreciated.

-- ok, is it cut once measure twice, cut twice measure once???? I know....I'll just keep cutting until it's long enough.


11 replies so far

View Loren's profile

Loren

9431 posts in 3430 days


#1 posted 10-04-2017 01:33 AM

The stuff can be welded. It’s a job for
a pro I think. Call around and ask who
can weld pot metal.

View MrUnix's profile

MrUnix

5808 posts in 1981 days


#2 posted 10-04-2017 02:15 AM

Might be weldable, might not – depending on composition… and even if it can, it won’t be pretty :)
You could also try something like Muggy weld, but not sure how well it will hold up.
I’d just buy a couple of new ones from Griz… about $13 a piece.

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - In Dog I trust... everything else is questionable

View bladedust's profile

bladedust

197 posts in 2049 days


#3 posted 10-04-2017 02:40 AM

Thank you, Loren. I’m not sure if it would be worthwhile for a professional to take on such a small project.

Brad, I did see the replacement parts on Grizzly’s site, but I also need the front and rear trunnions for a total of $67. Seems a little steep for some small cheap pot metal parts. I was hoping there was a product out there that could bond pot metal effectively.

-- ok, is it cut once measure twice, cut twice measure once???? I know....I'll just keep cutting until it's long enough.

View Loren's profile

Loren

9431 posts in 3430 days


#4 posted 10-04-2017 05:22 AM

Depending on how it is broken you may be
able to JB-Weld it and then drill and apply
mending plates. JB-Weld is cheap and
otherwise useful to have on hand if the
joint fails, which it probably will without the
plates.

View Ripper70's profile

Ripper70

489 posts in 691 days


#5 posted 10-04-2017 05:44 AM

I like Loren’s idea using the JB Weld and mending plates. Worth a try but even if it fails, spending $67 bucks on some parts that would repair a machine that you’d be fortunate to find for half the $700 bucks it’d cost to buy new, would be well worth the expense.

-- "You know, I'm such a great driver, it's incomprehensible that they took my license away." --Vince Ricardo

View Planeman40's profile

Planeman40

999 posts in 2543 days


#6 posted 10-04-2017 02:50 PM

Bladedust, I see you are in Georgia. I live in Sandy Springs, a suburb on the north side of Atlanta. I have welding equipment (oxy-acetelyne, MIG, TIG) and a metal lathe and mill. My guess is that “pot metal” is cast iron. Cast iron can be easily brazed (like soldering, but with brass which is very strong). If you can bring it by I will take a look at it and, if possible, will fix it for nothing. Contact me at rufus.carswellsr@gmail.com.

-- Always remember: It is a mathematical certainty that half the people in this country are below average in intelligence!

View bladedust's profile

bladedust

197 posts in 2049 days


#7 posted 10-05-2017 08:36 PM

Loren, i think that is a splendid idea and definitely worth a try, thank you.

Ripper, you are correct, $67 is inexpensive in the scheme of things, but I have an ailment in that I always look for a workaround. I guess you can call me a woodworker. Besides, I can’t wrap my brain around paying $67 for a couple of cheap pot metal replacement parts. I guess I am a woodworker.

Planeman, that is a very kind offer and I may take you up on it since I’m in Alpharetta. However, the limited research I did on welding pot metal suggests it may be too brittle and with a very low melting point making it difficult to weld. Then again, I know very little about welding, so I’ll defer to your expertise.

-- ok, is it cut once measure twice, cut twice measure once???? I know....I'll just keep cutting until it's long enough.

View Planeman40's profile

Planeman40

999 posts in 2543 days


#8 posted 10-05-2017 09:58 PM

“pot metal” is usually zinc which is unweldable. Of course, it could be aluminum which is weldable. Unfortunately my TIG welder is not set up for welding aluminum. But . . .

Here is something you may want to try that says it will solder aluminum and zinc!. It is from w well known manufacturer of gas welding torches and can be done with a hardware store butane torch. I have never used it though.

http://www.harrisproductsgroup.com/en/Products/Alloys/Soldering/Lead-Free-Solders/Al-Solder-500.aspx

Description: Aluminum Solder

Solder alloy for torch or iron. Used to join all solderable alloys to each other and to dissimilar metals. Also for zinc die-cast. Forms excellent, corrosion resistant joints on the tough to solder aluminum alloys. Also beneficial as a high temperature solder on most other metals. Not recommended for magnesium.

Typical Application: Forms excellent corrosion resistant joints on the tough-to-solder aluminum alloys. Joins all solderable aluminum alloys to each other and to dissimilar metals, both ferous an nonferrous. Also beneficial as a high temperature solder on most other metals.

And some further instructions about soldering aluminum that would probably also apply to zinc.

http://www.wikihow.com/Solder-Aluminum

If you want, buy the stuff and bring it all by my shop and we can try it together. I have been welding for more than 50 years so maybe I can bring a little more experience to it. But I say again, I have never soldered aluminum or zinc before though. I would still love to meet another relatively close woodworker.

-- Always remember: It is a mathematical certainty that half the people in this country are below average in intelligence!

View MrUnix's profile

MrUnix

5808 posts in 1981 days


#9 posted 10-06-2017 12:17 AM

“pot metal” is usually zinc which is unweldable.

The problem with pot metal, which is typically a zinc alloy, is that it has a very narrow (and very low) heat range where it can be bonded. Too much heat, and it will just melt away. Similar to trying to weld aluminium foil – it can be done at just the right heat, but too much and it just blobs and disappears.

It can be soldered though – although the heat range is still critical. Muggy weld, as I mentioned above, can be used successfully in a DIY application as it has a heat sensitive flux that changes color when the right temperature is reached (see directions on its use). Problem is, it will cost you just about or maybe slightly more than just buying the replacement parts to start with… and while it might work, it will still be a butt ugly repair that you will have to look at every time you use the machine :)

Another option would be just to forego the tilting of the tables and make a fixed mount for them… In all the time I’ve had my disc/belt sander, I can’t thing of a single time I’ve ever wanted to tilt the table.

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - In Dog I trust... everything else is questionable

View woodbutcherbynight's profile

woodbutcherbynight

3469 posts in 2191 days


#10 posted 10-06-2017 01:36 AM

I agree, for $67 you get the machine back to like new condition. A new one cost $725 currently, sinking $67 is not bad all things considered.

-- Live to tell the stories, they sound better that way.

View Planeman40's profile

Planeman40

999 posts in 2543 days


#11 posted 10-06-2017 01:02 PM

I have to agree. Just pay the $67. It will only hurt once and you will forget about it soon after.

-- Always remember: It is a mathematical certainty that half the people in this country are below average in intelligence!

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