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Makita 2030 Restoration

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Forum topic by Brazz04 posted 10-03-2017 01:43 AM 529 views 0 times favorited 15 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Brazz04

23 posts in 705 days


10-03-2017 01:43 AM

Just wanted to post some pictures of my Makita 2030 restoration and give a few tips on anyone that may be restoring one! It was in pretty rough shape when I got it but had almost all the pieces still on it. I got most of the planer specific parts from ereplacementparts.com so that’s a great source for parts. When I bought it, it was missing the crank handle for the planer portion and for the life of me I was unable to find a replacement, so I took a gamble on MMtoolsparts.com and bought the crank handle for a 2040 and thankfully it was an exact fit! A big thanks to MrUnix for getting me through the disassembly and working with the roll pins. I used some rust remover on the heavily rusted parts and that seemed to really eat the rust off in quick order. I used Rustoleum Hammered Verde Green and put a new coat of paint on everything. I am only missing the guard for the jointer side so if anyone has any information on where I could find one please let me know!

Thanks for looking!


15 replies so far

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MrUnix

6010 posts in 2038 days


#1 posted 10-03-2017 01:55 AM

Good job on the restore… and nice to know about the 2040 handwheel. I really disliked the plastic (which is the only thing plastic on the whole machine), so I just wound up making one out of wood on the lathe, complete with the little spinner handle :)

As for the jointer guard – I’ve looked everywhere for one without success… they certainly are made out of unobtanium. Fortunately, I have the OEM one on my other 2030, so I’m going to make one out of wood using it as a pattern. More or less the last thing I need to do on my restore.

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - In Dog I trust... everything else is questionable

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DMiller

251 posts in 312 days


#2 posted 10-03-2017 02:58 AM

Very Cool! I like to see these old machines restored! Would love to eventually get one. Keep it up! DMiller

-- Dale Miller Modesto, CA "I can do all things through him that strengtheneth me." Philippians 4:13. "Woodworking minus patience equals firewood."

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Brazz04

23 posts in 705 days


#3 posted 10-04-2017 06:10 PM

I just finished up the dust collection to match what I have on my table saw station. I just made a manifold out of aluminum for the planer side and made a similar duct on the jointer side.

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fivecodys

838 posts in 1475 days


#4 posted 10-04-2017 06:22 PM

That came out really nice. Good job!

-- Chem, Central California

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cabmaker

1624 posts in 2647 days


#5 posted 10-05-2017 01:09 PM

Very nice…..I have seen a couple of those in use, but it has been a while, people i knew that had them were very happy with em

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PPK

870 posts in 648 days


#6 posted 10-05-2017 01:41 PM

That looks like a really great machine. It must be fairly unique – I’ve never seen any large stationary Makita equipment. Maybe that’s just me. Do they make any other large machinery?

-- Pete

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Brazz04

23 posts in 705 days


#7 posted 10-11-2017 02:08 PM

I’ve been adding the final touches to the Makita, and now have a wixey WR550 installed on the machine. I still need to calibrate it but it seems to be functioning properly for now! I also bought new blades for both the jointer and planer sides of the machine. I figure its worth asking, does anyone know of anywhere to find the planer blades for the 2030 rather than having to cut down the 2030N blades?

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RookieWood

22 posts in 690 days


#8 posted 12-15-2017 03:43 PM

Brazz04, if you are still lookign for the jointer gaurd, there is a gentlemen selling parts on here that may have the jointer guard. The title is (I have Makita 2030 parts for sale!).

Very nice job on the restoration. I am getting ready to restore the one I got a while back. Also I like how you set up your dust collector. I will be coping you on that for sure.

Brad M

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Brazz04

23 posts in 705 days


#9 posted 12-15-2017 04:09 PM

Thanks Brad, I actually asked that seller for the cutter guard I believe the day after he had sold it! So Close! Thanks for the comments on the restoration, the dust collection does seem to work pretty well, I just was in the garage using it when I got your notification. The one thing I really want now is a shelix head for it, but its just so much money!

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RookieWood

22 posts in 690 days


#10 posted 12-15-2017 04:26 PM

I looked into those heads as well. Man they are proud of them. I think I asked someone else this question as well but when you did your restoration did you have anything to guide you on the rebuild? I have a manual that I got off line and my plan is to take pictures as I tear down and use the manual. Is there a better plan?

Brad M.

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RookieWood

22 posts in 690 days


#11 posted 12-15-2017 04:34 PM

I just noticed you mounted something on the side of the jointer. Looks like a dark piece of wood. What is that for?

Brad M

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Brazz04

23 posts in 705 days


#12 posted 12-15-2017 04:35 PM

I used probably the same manual as you have, but really it was a lot of guessing. I did have to cut one roll pin, the one that aligns the jointer table to the planer head housing. But most of the rest I was able to drive out without a lot of issue. I can add more pics of the tear down this evening. MrUnix has some great pictures as well to help you see all of the parts.

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Brazz04

23 posts in 705 days


#13 posted 12-15-2017 06:59 PM

Here are a few pictures of the 2030 torn down, it may help you see whats what.

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MrUnix

6010 posts in 2038 days


#14 posted 12-16-2017 05:27 AM

I did have to cut one roll pin, the one that aligns the jointer table to the planer head housing.
- Brazz04

Those took me a bit to figure out, but I finally figured out how to do it without having to destroy anything. The key is to take the base off first so the posts are free. From there, the jointer portion will pop off the side leaving those guide pins in place :)

I have a manual that I got off line and my plan is to take pictures as I tear down and use the manual. Is there a better plan?
- RookieWood

I have some ‘notes’ that I made during my adventure that pretty much details the disassembly process along with a few tips regarding the process… I’ll dig around and see if I can find them.

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - In Dog I trust... everything else is questionable

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MrUnix

6010 posts in 2038 days


#15 posted 12-16-2017 06:50 AM

Ok, found it. I’m posting it here as the thread topic is appropriate, and so everyone can see it and I don’t have to e-mail or PM it to individuals on a case by case basis. It’s by no means complete, but it should help with disassembly, and others can add their tips and tricks to make it even more applicable.

—————————————-
Disassembly procedure for a Makita 2030 planer/jointer
June 11, 2015

Overview

The Makita 2030 was made in the 1970’s and 1980’s, and is a 12 inch (304mm)
thickness planer/6 inch (155mm) jointer combination machine. There were 3
different revisions of these machines over the years (Type 1,2 and 3), but
the differences are very minimal. Makita later introduced the 2030N (Note
the “N” on the end), which while looking very similar, is really a different
machine in many ways (and can be identified by the different support posts
used).

This document was based on the restoration I performed on a Type 2 machine.
It was purchased in pretty rough condiditon and needed a complete teardown
and rebuild. The most common problem with these machines, besides simple
lack of maintenance, is the original rubber used on the feed rollers. It
will, over time, become brittle and eventually crumble off the metal roller
shafts. Fortunately, there are several companies that can re-cover the
rollers for much less than purchasing new. Mine had no rubber on them at
all when I bought the machine, so that is exactly what I had done. It was
also missing parts and very rusty. During the process, every part on the
machine was addressed in some fashion. This is not a trivial restore, as
there are a LOT of parts to these machines:

This is the general flow I used to disassemble the machine:

- Take off anything that can be easily removed. This includes the upper hood, motor, cutter head guard, jointer fence and table(s), most of the gears and pulleys under the side cover, electricals, etc. If it can be removed, remove it. Take lots of pictures, put parts in baggies and label the bags so you know where they came from. Take some more pictures (even of stuff you don’t think you will need!).

Note: You don’t (can’t) take the table raise/lower gearing completely off, so just leave it attached to the table for now.

Note: It’s also a good idea to give a good shot of penetrating oil at the top and bottom of the posts and let it soak in. And multiple applications depending on how rusty it is. I soaked mine every day for over a month and still had problems.

- The goal is to get to a bare machine so you can flip it upside down. The ‘bare’ machine should consist of only the cast iron base, the four support posts (2 big, 2 small), the planer table and the two major body castings (jointer and planer) complete with the two cutter heads inside. Get a couple of 2×4’s or whatever you have handy and put them lengthwise on the planer table and raise the table all the way up until the wood stops it from going any higher. Finally, gently flip the machine over and use some blocking to keep it from tipping. Also use blankets or mats under it to prevent scratching.

- There are 4 spring (roll) pins holding the posts in the cast iron base. Those need to be driven out with a pin punch. There are two large ones for the table posts, and two smaller ones for the jointer support posts. The pins for the jointer support posts are short, so they will drop out into the tube. Once removed, the cast iron base can be lifted off the posts. It may take a bit of wiggling and a few extra hands, and you need to turn the table adjustment hand wheel to help raise the base off (for about 1 inch).

Note: On mine, the posts were rusted sold in the base and refused to come loose, even after soaking daily with penetrating oil for several months. A hydraulic jack was used between the base and underside of the planer table to provide enough force to finally get it removed.

- Remove the planer table and lifting mechanism. The lifting assembly can be unbolted and removed completely, and the table should just lift up off the support posts with a little bit of effort.

Note: There is one bolt on the lifting mechanism that is under the shaft and can’t easily be removed. Remove the other accessable bolts first, and then lift the whole assembly as that last bolt is unscrewed.

- At this point, all the gears and pulleys should have been remvoed from the gearbox, and you just need to remove the cutter heads. Remove the end caps on either end of them and take them off. The one on the jointer needs to have the turn wheel taken off, which is removed by pounding out a spring (roll) pin that holds it in place. Loosen the set screws on the two couplings between them and pry them apart with a screwdiver. You should be able to remove the belt once they are seperated enough. Each cutter head needs to be removed individually out where the outer cover/bearing housing was. A combination of large screwdrivers, wood block/dowel and a hammer, pry bar or bearing ‘pickle fork’, and other implements of torture may be needed, but they will eventually come out. If you are lucky, the inner bearings will come out with the cutter heads. Otherwise, you need to tap out the inner bearngs once the heads are removed.

- Split the two main castings. Remove the 4 bolts holding them together, and then seperate. You may need to pry and bang on it with a rubber mallet a bit. There are two spring (roll) pins still in place that are used for algnment, and they will still be holding things together. Once you get a slight split, use a screwdriver or pry bar (wrapped in tape to keep from buggering things up), alternating from one side to the other, gently ‘rocking’ it off. An occasional tap with a rubber mallet also help.

- Once the castings are split, you can drive out the four remaining spring (roll) pins holding the posts in place, and remove the posts.

- Reassembly is basically the reverse.

SPECIFIC TIPS

- GEARBOX -

For the gear box stuff, start by removing the side cover which is held
on by one screw. Once exposed, remove the 4 snap ring holding the gears
and idler in place and remove them along with the chain. The tensioner
can then be removed, which is held in place by another large snap ring.
After all that has been removed, the rear cover plate can be removed to
expose the cutter head drive belt and two pulleys. Both pulleys are
screwed onto their shafts and need to be unscrewed. The easiest way to
get the belt off is to remove the cutter head pulley. It is a normal
right hand thread, so it unscrews in the normal (lefty loosey) fashion.
Easiest way to do this is to hold the pulley and rotate the cutter head
by hand to unscrew it. The other pulley, which is a left hand thread
(opposite of normal) can be left in place until later when the gear box
is removed. Once the drive belt is removed, the 4 screws holding the
gear box in place can be removed and it can then be seperated from the
rest of the machine with a little prodding and prying.

Note: On my machine, the grease inside the gearbox had turned into wax and had to be completely cleaned out.

Note: The idler shaft is also a left hand thread, so needs to be turned clockwise to remove.

-- Brad in FL - In Dog I trust... everything else is questionable

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