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WorkSharp 3000 Arrives!!!

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Forum topic by paratrooper34 posted 1266 days ago 824 views 1 time favorited 5 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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paratrooper34

760 posts in 1547 days


1266 days ago

Hello LJs!!!

I received my WorkSharp 3000 from Home Depot today, the one for 60 something dollars. I am reading through the owner’s manual and I am looking for some input from fellow LJers who have experience using this machine. What tips and techniques do you recommend that may not be included in the owner’s manual? Anything that should be added to the information in the manual? Whatever you think may be relevant to the new user.

I have to add that Home Depot really came through with this deal. They had to have absorbed a pretty big loss to honor their listing mistake. But their loss on one item is probably going to be made up other ways. For instance, I for one, will frequent their store more often as I like to support a company that makes good on a deal, even if it was a mistake. Kudos to HD.

-- Mike


5 replies so far

View RiverWood's profile

RiverWood

115 posts in 1355 days


#1 posted 1266 days ago

First thing is I doubt they sold it at near the loss many think. That said I really think they went far above what they had to do. Sorry about the commentary, the real reason for my post is a helpful hint. Hold the sandpaper disks up to a bright light to see what grit they are before peeling the backing. Then use something to put in he center hole to help align the disk. ( I used a 1/4 inch socket that fit the hole)

-- My favorite projects were firewood bound

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paratrooper34

760 posts in 1547 days


#2 posted 1266 days ago

RiverWood, that is exactly what I was looking for. I never would have thought to use something to line up the paper to the disk. I also noted the grit numbers were hard to read. Thanks for the help!

-- Mike

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Stonekettle

116 posts in 1499 days


#3 posted 1266 days ago

I have both the WS 2000 and the 3000. I have the leather stropping wheel permanantly mounted on the 2000 due to its higher rotational speed and that’s all I use it for. The 3000 I use for everything else. It is hands down the best machine on the market for sharpening handplane irons and wood chisels – and I have the optional add-on top deck and guide for large/wide blades. Make sure to go through the calibration and squaring process specified in the manual, you want the blade guides perfectly square. My local industrial hardware store periodically does overstock sales and I picked up a number of additional glass wheels for pennies on the dollar, along with packs of sharpening paper. I recommend getting a couple of extra glass wheels if you can afford it, they’re good for specialty grits – I’ve got one with 14000grit micromesh that I use for putting that final scalpel sharp edge on plane irons. You might want to pick up a couple packs of coarse grit if you have a lot of tools that you’ll be regrinding initially. Once they are properly trued you won’t need the coarse grit any more, but when I first got my WS I wore out a dozen large grit wheels regrinding all of my plane irons and wood chisels – just because the edge you can get with WS is so amazing. I’ve collected, refurbished, and built handplanes for years, and the WS’s ability to true and sharpen the irons really makes using them a joy. You won’t believe the curls you get.

I also use the see-through wheels for sharpening turning tools and carving knives. I usually put a basic edge on skews or gouges using a bench grinder, and then put a final edge on using the underneath see-through wheel on the 3000. It takes some practice to learn the proper techique especially free-style shapening on the bench grinder (of course, you could use a Wolverine jig, but I shapen turning tools so often that I’m used to doing it free-style), but it doesn’t take much to learn how to do it on the WS3000 – following the directions in the WS manual you’ll be putting an edge on turning tools and carving gouges like a pro in no time. A quick freehand strop on the stropping wheel when they start to dull is enough to put the edge back on without having to turn off the lathe.

Because I’m primarly a turner and carver, I spend a significant fraction of my time sharpening tools. I own damned near every type of shapening gadget there is. Nowadays they all sit unused under the workbench (and that includes the Tormek) and I use the grinder and the WS 2000 and 3000 almost exclusively.

-- Jim Wright, Stonekettle Station

View John in SD's profile

John in SD

140 posts in 2408 days


#4 posted 1266 days ago

Hey, I just got mine today and love it already

-- Life used to be soooo much simpler!!!!

View RiverWood's profile

RiverWood

115 posts in 1355 days


#5 posted 1259 days ago

I got another glass wheel in order to fill in the huge gaps in grits. I used 240 and 800 because that is what I had on hand. I also made another plate if you want to call it that out of 3/4 inch mdf. To this I glued on a piece of leather and that didn’t work at all . The second try with double stick tape did the trick. I now have a leather hone that works great. I will be using this setup for next hour or so, working my way up to my 750’s. ASK questions if you have them

-- My favorite projects were firewood bound

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