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Forum topic by Ben posted 10-02-2017 12:25 AM 568 views 0 times favorited 15 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Ben

345 posts in 2639 days


10-02-2017 12:25 AM

Hi Gang,

I’ve been saving up and acquiring high quality tools for my tool cabinet, to never leave my bench.
For on-site work I have a mongrel set of vintage chisels.

So far in my cabinet I have a nice set of Kawasei Japenese dovetail chisels.
I’m considering a set of the Veritas PMV-11 bench chisels, but am not sure if this would be redundant.

Basically the PMV-11 can handle heavier chopping tasks? Or is the steel comparable?

Thanks.
B


15 replies so far

View Loren's profile

Loren

9428 posts in 3430 days


#1 posted 10-02-2017 12:43 AM

If you’re looking for chopping chisels in that
kind of price range, check out the Barr chisels.
They’re quite hefty. I have one Veritas chisel
and it is delicate in comparison to the Barrs.
The lack of a ring on the end is also a drawback
for heavy use imo.

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Ben

345 posts in 2639 days


#2 posted 10-02-2017 01:32 AM

Dang, those Barr look sweet!!
Thanks!

View harrison17's profile

harrison17

20 posts in 23 days


#3 posted 10-02-2017 02:20 AM

If you’re looking for heavy chopping chisels I don’t know if I’d look at the Veritas. I’ve seen a few split handles on Instagram. I’ve been drooling over them, but now I’m second guessing the design, even though on the site they say that can take heavy mallet blows.

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Ben

345 posts in 2639 days


#4 posted 10-02-2017 08:19 PM

What do you guys know about A2 steel?
I was reading some older reviews about the Barr chisels and it sounds like he used to make them out of carbon steel, but they are now A2. Those older reviews spoke about preferring the carbon steel over the A2.

Thanks.

View Rich's profile

Rich

1711 posts in 371 days


#5 posted 10-02-2017 08:37 PM

You got me curious too, Ben. Here’s an article where Ron Hock explains A2 versus O1 steel. Seems pretty thorough.

http://www.thewoodwhisperer.com/articles/a2-vs-o1-tool-steel/

-- No matter how much you push the envelope, it'll still be stationery.

View Kirk650's profile

Kirk650

491 posts in 531 days


#6 posted 10-03-2017 01:30 AM

I have O1, A2, and PMV-11, and have used and sharpened them. The latter is the best for holding an edge. No doubt in my mind. As for which one has the best and toughest handle, I can’t say. Never have broken any of them. Probably the LN socket chisels, where the handles can be replaced easily, would be a good choice, though the steel isn’t as tough as the PMV-11 steel.

View bbasiaga's profile

bbasiaga

980 posts in 1777 days


#7 posted 10-03-2017 02:50 AM

A2 is probably better than O1 for a chopping chisel. The way I understand it, A2 won’t get as sharp but stays sharper longer than O1. O1 will take a keener eedge, but doesn’t stay as sharp as long.

PMV11 is supposed to be the best of both worlds, and carries the price to reflect it.

I have two of the LN chisels in A2. They are pretty stout. If you are looking to do a lot of mortises, look for a pig sticker style. I got one for fathers day a few years ago. I think its an Iiles. That sucker can take a beating. Super impressive.

Brian

-- Part of engineering is to know when to put your calculator down and pick up your tools.

View Derek Cohen's profile

Derek Cohen

348 posts in 3751 days


#8 posted 10-03-2017 12:09 PM



Hi Gang,

I ve been saving up and acquiring high quality tools for my tool cabinet, to never leave my bench.
For on-site work I have a mongrel set of vintage chisels.

So far in my cabinet I have a nice set of Kawasei Japenese dovetail chisels.
I m considering a set of the Veritas PMV-11 bench chisels, but am not sure if this would be redundant.

Basically the PMV-11 can handle heavier chopping tasks? Or is the steel comparable?

Thanks.
B

- Ben

I tested 4 chisel steels in chopping mode. They included the Veritas PM-V11 and Koyamaichi – either would get my recommendation …

http://www.inthewoodshop.com/ToolReviews/FourChiselSteelsCompared.html

Regards from Perth

Derek

-- Buildiing furniture, and reviewing and building tools at http://www.inthewoodshop.com

View harrison17's profile

harrison17

20 posts in 23 days


#9 posted 10-03-2017 01:39 PM


Hi Gang,

I ve been saving up and acquiring high quality tools for my tool cabinet, to never leave my bench.
For on-site work I have a mongrel set of vintage chisels.

So far in my cabinet I have a nice set of Kawasei Japenese dovetail chisels.
I m considering a set of the Veritas PMV-11 bench chisels, but am not sure if this would be redundant.

Basically the PMV-11 can handle heavier chopping tasks? Or is the steel comparable?

Thanks.
B

- Ben

I tested 4 chisel steels in chopping mode. They included the Veritas PM-V11 and Koyamaichi – either would get my recommendation …

http://www.inthewoodshop.com/ToolReviews/FourChiselSteelsCompared.html

Regards from Perth

Derek

- Derek Cohen

Hey Derek, have you seen any problems with the PM-V11 chisels? I’ve come across a few pictures of handles split. Someone also told me that they sold their set because they couldn’t be used for medium to heavy work and another person told me they were only for cabinet work and not joinery. Your input would be great

View Kirk650's profile

Kirk650

491 posts in 531 days


#10 posted 10-03-2017 01:57 PM

An excellent write-up, Derek. Not long ago I did a blanket chest in Hard Maple, and I used all of my chisels(Pfiel, LN, Veritas PMV-11). When it was finished, my feelings on the chisels were similar to yours, in that the steel was important but the handles and ergonomics also mattered. The LN socket chisels were so nice to use, and my clear favorite, but needed more sharpening. I did find that if I just took the time to touch up the edges before they got too dull, it didn’t take much time to do so with a black Arkansas stone and a leather strop with jeweler’s rouge.

I think the Pfiel chisels held an edge longer than the LN chisels, just to mention it.

View Derek Cohen's profile

Derek Cohen

348 posts in 3751 days


#11 posted 10-03-2017 01:57 PM

Hi Harrison

If you hit any wooden handle with a steel hammer, you will split it. If you use a wooden mallet, you should be fine (I tested the Veritas chisels pre-production, and gave the handles a hard time. There was minimal damage). In everyday use I prefer mallets with UHMW faces …

Bench chisels are thicker and stiffer than paring chisels. This includes the Veritas, LN and almost all modern bench chisels today. They all tend to be 3/16” thick. Japanese bench chisels are similar. One exception is the Blue Spruce, which are 1/8” thick, but they are A2. Vintage Berg and vintage Marples are also thinner. It is a trade off since the latter do not hold an edge as long.

I’d ignore the “advice” you have been given and just get the chisels you like to hold and use. It is as important that you like the handle, balance and the feedback. Steel is in the mix. Consider the whole.

Regards from Perth

Derek

-- Buildiing furniture, and reviewing and building tools at http://www.inthewoodshop.com

View WayneC's profile

WayneC

13719 posts in 3879 days


#12 posted 10-03-2017 03:29 PM

I like the UHMW face idea. I’ve not seen that before.

-- We must guard our enthusiasm as we would our life - James Krenov

View harrison17's profile

harrison17

20 posts in 23 days


#13 posted 10-03-2017 03:35 PM



Hi Harrison

If you hit any wooden handle with a steel hammer, you will split it. If you use a wooden mallet, you should be fine (I tested the Veritas chisels pre-production, and gave the handles a hard time. There was minimal damage). In everyday use I prefer mallets with UHMW faces …

Bench chisels are thicker and stiffer than paring chisels. This includes the Veritas, LN and almost all modern bench chisels today. They all tend to be 3/16” thick. Japanese bench chisels are similar. One exception is the Blue Spruce, which are 1/8” thick, but they are A2. Vintage Berg and vintage Marples are also thinner. It is a trade off since the latter do not hold an edge as long.

I d ignore the “advice” you have been given and just get the chisels you like to hold and use. It is as important that you like the handle, balance and the feedback. Steel is in the mix. Consider the whole.

Regards from Perth

Derek

- Derek Cohen

Great to know. My chisel hammer is the Thor with the white nylon and soft gray faces. Thanks for the info and really helpful chisel review.

View Ben's profile

Ben

345 posts in 2639 days


#14 posted 10-03-2017 10:25 PM

Thanks for all the feedback guys.

FYI, I turned new handles for my vintage English chisels out of Bubinga.
I can hit those things with my 20 ounce framing hammer without making so much as a dent.
Not that that’s my regular practice…
So, I’m not sure about the PMV-11 handles splitting.

I’m leaning towards getting the Barr set of 4, and maybe augmenting with the 1/8” and 1 1/2” as well.

Thanks again.

View BubbaIBA's profile

BubbaIBA

384 posts in 2159 days


#15 posted 10-07-2017 08:21 PM



Hi Gang,

I ve been saving up and acquiring high quality tools for my tool cabinet, to never leave my bench.
For on-site work I have a mongrel set of vintage chisels.

So far in my cabinet I have a nice set of Kawasei Japenese dovetail chisels.
I m considering a set of the Veritas PMV-11 bench chisels, but am not sure if this would be redundant.

Basically the PMV-11 can handle heavier chopping tasks? Or is the steel comparable?

Thanks.
B

- Ben

Ben,

Chisels are too personal to rely on the advice of others. Several examples: Such as Barr chisels, someone touted Barr chisels which I’m sure are well made but for my preference much too heavy for bench chisels and I like the easy sharpening of O1 iron. LN chisels are well made but the socket tends to unbalance them and the handles are much too short, add in the A2 and they are not a chisel I would buy. The LV chisels blades are too thick to my liking and I’ve had a handle split on one (only wood on wood and I do not go all Conan on my chisels). And so it goes, the best way is to buy a chisel in a size you will use and work with it for awhile. If you like the feel and usability of it buy more if not change brands or styles.

My favorite style chisel for general bench work is a vintage Boxwood handled Marples with a Firmer blade. They are light, well balanced, very nimble and feel great in hand. But no one makes that type of chisel anymore so I guess that shows how much I know about picking chisels :-).

BTW, don’t try to get one make/style chisel to do everything. Get one to do most of the light work like paring and another for the light chopping and one more such as a pig sticker to chop mortises. While that is three chisels you do not not need the three in every size.

ken

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