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Compressor Tank - Repairable

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Forum topic by Marleywoodie posted 10-01-2017 04:10 PM 516 views 0 times favorited 18 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Marleywoodie

3 posts in 207 days


10-01-2017 04:10 PM

Anybody know anything about compressor tanks? I got this as part of a bigger equipment purchase. The previous owner had (tried) to put some attachment on it so he could spray finishes with it. The threads are all buggered up as you can see from the picture.

Can this this be plugged up sufficiently so I can use the compressor, or is it just trashed. Is it worth trying to fix?


18 replies so far

View kaerlighedsbamsen's profile

kaerlighedsbamsen

1229 posts in 1491 days


#1 posted 10-01-2017 04:22 PM

Drill out hole, tap new threads, put in plug with ptfe tape. Done.

-- "Do or Do not. There is no try." - Yoda

View MrUnix's profile

MrUnix

5793 posts in 1977 days


#2 posted 10-01-2017 05:36 PM

Can this this be plugged up sufficiently so I can use the compressor,...

If I’m not mistaken, that is where the regulator/pressure cut-off switch are installed (seen hanging with what looks like a coat hanger in the picture), probably using a 1/4 NPT pipe nipple. You can’t just plug it up. Since the nipple is a pipe thread, I’d try re-installing the existing 1/4” nipple with some teflon tape first. It might just have enough thread to fit. Otherwise, you will need to clean up the hole/threads, go up to a bigger nipple and use an adapter on the regulator end to reduce it back to it’s original size. Certainly fixable, and probably pretty easily.

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - In Dog I trust... everything else is questionable

View William Shelley's profile

William Shelley

436 posts in 1247 days


#3 posted 10-01-2017 05:40 PM

Harbor freight sells a cheap set of 1/4, 3/8, and 1/2” NPT taps. You could drill out the hole and tap the next size up. The only issue I see is that you’d end up with metal shavings inside your air tank.

Just from the picture, that hole does indeed look “buggered”. Doesn’t look to me like you could even get a pipe to thread into that mess at all.

-- Woodworking from an engineer's perspective

View Redoak49's profile

Redoak49

2786 posts in 1766 days


#4 posted 10-01-2017 05:53 PM

Those fixes might work or might blow at at high pressure and go ballistic. If it were me, I would not try it.

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Marleywoodie

3 posts in 207 days


#5 posted 10-01-2017 10:11 PM



Those fixes might work or might blow at at high pressure and go ballistic. If it were me, I would not try it.

- Redoak49

And that is my fear.

What if I got it welded closed?

View MrUnix's profile

MrUnix

5793 posts in 1977 days


#6 posted 10-01-2017 10:28 PM

What if I got it welded closed?
- Marleywoodie

And then what? Drill it out and re-tap? Otherwise, you have no place for the air to get to the regulator and pressure switch, which kind of defeats the purpose of having a compressor :)

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - In Dog I trust... everything else is questionable

View William Shelley's profile

William Shelley

436 posts in 1247 days


#7 posted 10-01-2017 11:48 PM



What if I got it welded closed?
- Marleywoodie

And then what? Drill it out and re-tap? Otherwise, you have no place for the air to get to the regulator and pressure switch, which kind of defeats the purpose of having a compressor :)

Cheers,
Brad

- MrUnix

Unless it’s an auxiliary tank. But most home shops don’t need one of those!

-- Woodworking from an engineer's perspective

View woodbutcherbynight's profile

woodbutcherbynight

3443 posts in 2187 days


#8 posted 10-02-2017 12:10 AM

You can rethread the hole and if you really want to make sure the pipe stays have it welded. Use a short nipple and a threaded cap so if you decide to use that spot later you still can. For homeowner stuff this is sufficient and will hold. Had mine done with the drain not wanting to come out. Got it out but it made a mess. Tapped to larger size and had welded. Was in use for 14 years before compressor got replaced for bigger unit. Never leaked that I saw and showed no signs of fatigue.

-- Live to tell the stories, they sound better that way.

View AZWoody's profile

AZWoody

1090 posts in 1002 days


#9 posted 10-02-2017 12:13 AM



Those fixes might work or might blow at at high pressure and go ballistic. If it were me, I would not try it.

- Redoak49

It’s on the part of the tank that is reinforced to be drilled and tapped for fittings. There’s not going to be an issue of weakening by doing any of the fixes recommended unless it was not welded right or there’s a crack in the plate which checking out can determine.

View TungOil's profile

TungOil

661 posts in 273 days


#10 posted 10-02-2017 12:20 AM

If that were my compressor I’d try to chase the threads with the proper size tap to see if they will clean up sufficiently before going larger. Only if that didn’t work would I go the next larger pipe tap them bush it down.

A trick that my pipe fitters use when drilling or tapping to keep the chips out of the system is to fill the flutes with a heavy grease. the grease catches most of the chips before they drop into the tank.

-- The optimist says "the glass is half full". The pessimist says "the glass is half empty". The engineer says "the glass is twice as big as it needs to be"

View William Shelley's profile

William Shelley

436 posts in 1247 days


#11 posted 10-02-2017 12:24 AM

Honestly, although I’m all for fixing your own stuff, pressure vessels are one thing that should NOT be welded on unless you really know what you’re doing. Drilling and tapping is fine, but the heat from welding can alter the properties of the surrounding metal in ways that require structural analysis. The area near the weld could become more brittle than the rest of the tank and that COULD lead to an explosion.

So anyone suggesting welding on a compressor tank – please don’t. Unless you have the correct equipment to anneal the vessel after welding, don’t weld on it.

-- Woodworking from an engineer's perspective

View johnstoneb's profile

johnstoneb

2560 posts in 1950 days


#12 posted 10-02-2017 03:02 AM

Yes you can plug it up but then you have a 30 gallon bomb sitting in your garage. Plug that hole you have no way of regulating the pressure in the tank and no way of getting air out of the tank except when the tank reaches its pressure limits and blows up.

-- Bruce, Boise, ID

View pauljuilleret's profile

pauljuilleret

95 posts in 1430 days


#13 posted 10-02-2017 11:23 AM

when I look at the picture to me it looks like the pipe has broken off in the tank. If that is so try using an easy out and see if you can remove the broken pipe that way.

View PPK's profile

PPK

733 posts in 587 days


#14 posted 10-05-2017 01:55 PM



Honestly, although I m all for fixing your own stuff, pressure vessels are one thing that should NOT be welded on unless you really know what you re doing. Drilling and tapping is fine, but the heat from welding can alter the properties of the surrounding metal in ways that require structural analysis. The area near the weld could become more brittle than the rest of the tank and that COULD lead to an explosion.

So anyone suggesting welding on a compressor tank – please don t. Unless you have the correct equipment to anneal the vessel after welding, don t weld on it.

- William Shelley

This man is right. For your own and other’s safety, please don’t try welding a pressure vessel. Tapping threads could work, most likely.

-- Pete

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PPK

733 posts in 587 days


#15 posted 10-05-2017 02:01 PM

Is it worth it? Well, does the compressor run? Is it one of those oil-less ones? You can buy a brand spankin new oil-less one for about $150… (I personally don’t like the noisy oil-less compressors) So I guess that’s your call

-- Pete

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