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Millimeters to Fractional Inches Conversion

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Forum topic by hokieman posted 09-30-2017 10:22 PM 1590 views 0 times favorited 22 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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hokieman

180 posts in 3591 days


09-30-2017 10:22 PM

I have been working with Blum drawer slides and soft close hinges and much of the installation instructions are in millimeters. I found this handy program for converting millimeters to fractional inches. http://www.rapidtables.com/convert/length/mm-to-inch.htm

I just downloaded this on my phone and bookmarked it and it is always available to me in my shop. The most difficult part of this is trying to find 19/32 of an inch on my rule! Maybe one day the US will convert to metric but I doubt it.


22 replies so far

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corelz125

314 posts in 813 days


#1 posted 09-30-2017 11:15 PM

I use an app on my phone for conversions. Its called handyman calculator by kalyani also has a ton of other features for measurements

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Madmark2

372 posts in 425 days


#2 posted 09-30-2017 11:37 PM

35mm Cup centers @ 13/16 & use a self center #8 drill pilot for the screw hole.

M

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Andybb

550 posts in 441 days


#3 posted 10-01-2017 12:11 AM

Thanks. I will check out the app but as handy as my phone apps are, when I’m in the shop these are much faster for me. I just put them in a plastic sleeve attached by a string to hang on the side of my bench and router table respectively. I always know where they are. Low tech in 1/64ths”.

My other trick for stuff less than 6 inches is to use my calipers and and let it do the conversion for me.

————————————————————————————————————————————————————————

I like this one also.

-- Andybb - GO HAWKS!

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Rick_M

10631 posts in 2217 days


#4 posted 10-01-2017 02:58 AM

Seems like it would be easier to buy a metric rule than constantly converting. I have rules and tapes in inches, metric, and tenths of an inch; they all come in handy. Earlier my daughter needed a bunch of stuff cut and the parts list was in tenths, 1.83”, 1.71”, etc. No trouble at all.

-- http://thewoodknack.blogspot.com/

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WoodES

85 posts in 1528 days


#5 posted 10-01-2017 03:15 AM

Type mm into Google, a conversion website will be the result.

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jbay

1857 posts in 736 days


#6 posted 10-01-2017 03:39 AM

I just use 25.4 and divide or multiply depending on which I’m converting.
I always have my phone with me anyway, so nothing else to carry around or find. Just pull it out and use the calculator app.

-- If anyone would like to see my Portfolio, PM me and I would be glad to send you the link.

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AlaskaGuy

3654 posts in 2146 days


#7 posted 10-01-2017 03:49 AM

The instructions that came with my Blum under mount drawer slides had both MM and imperial measurement right on the instruction. No conversion necessary.

I do have metric tapes and steel rules and my calipers read both MM and imperial. I can convert either way with a touch of a button.

-- Alaskan's for Global warming!

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Andybb

550 posts in 441 days


#8 posted 10-01-2017 05:33 AM


Seems like it would be easier to buy a metric rule than constantly converting. I have rules and tapes in inches, metric, and tenths of an inch; they all come in handy. Earlier my daughter needed a bunch of stuff cut and the parts list was in tenths, 1.83”, 1.71”, etc. No trouble at all.

- Rick_M


Apologies to the OP for the hijack. I have an architects rule that I haven’t used in 30 years and I was a chemistry major so have no problem with the math or conversions. My issue is that I am a 60 year old American curmudgeon and my brain is calibrated to imperial. If you tell me it’s 37C outside I have no reference but I know what 98F feels like. My table saw fence is in inches, my router lift is in inches as well as almost everything else I measure or cut with so I convert back to inches most of the time. Lumber stores here are starting to measure thicknesses in mm so I do know that 3mm plywood fits in an 1/8th inch groove.

I remember back in the 70’s we were going to switch to metric and were ready to bite the bullet but unfortunately it just never happened.

Then there’s the Brits. A boxer weighs 12 stone 4 at the weigh in? WTF is that?! :-) Is a lid still 3 fingers?

-- Andybb - GO HAWKS!

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robscastle

4519 posts in 2041 days


#9 posted 10-01-2017 08:30 AM

Blum drawer slides and soft close hinges

-- Regards Robert

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AlaskaGuy

3654 posts in 2146 days


#10 posted 10-01-2017 08:39 AM

I never said a word about Blum Hinges. In fact nobody has except very brief mention by the OP

-- Alaskan's for Global warming!

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Fred Hargis

4757 posts in 2330 days


#11 posted 10-01-2017 02:36 PM


Maybe one day the US will convert to metric but I doubt it.

- hokieman

Unfortunate, but so true…...we really, really hate change (apparently).

-- Our village hasn't lost it's idiot, he was elected to congress.

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Markmh1

62 posts in 281 days


#12 posted 10-04-2017 01:10 PM

I’ve always used .03937 as a multiplier.

A millimeter is .03937 inches. Punch MM’s into your calculator, multiply, and you’re done. Remember fractional inches are just a division problem. 13/16 is 13 divided by 16= .8125. .8125 divided by .03937 = 20.67 MM.

If you want to figure in your head and get ballpark, just use 40 thousandths.

We went to the moon in inches.

Mark

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Rick_M

10631 posts in 2217 days


#13 posted 10-04-2017 03:58 PM

If I want to convert units, I pick up my phone and say, “Google, convert X to Y.” And it spits out an answer quicker than I can open an app or reference chart. I carry it everywhere I go, might as well put the tech to work.

-- http://thewoodknack.blogspot.com/

View AlaskaGuy's profile

AlaskaGuy

3654 posts in 2146 days


#14 posted 10-04-2017 05:32 PM



If I want to convert units, I pick up my phone and say, “Google, convert X to Y.” And it spits out an answer quicker than I can open an app or reference chart. I carry it everywhere I go, might as well put the tech to work.

- Rick_M

What you going to do when the network is down or the battery gives up or you drop it in the toilet?

-- Alaskan's for Global warming!

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Bohaiboy

73 posts in 1631 days


#15 posted 10-04-2017 05:49 PM

I have lived in numerous countries and all but US use metric. Metric is easy, so much easier than imperial. Unfortunately, as Americans, we are always trying to convert from metric back to imperial. For instance, if a cutout calls for 72 mm, we are scratching our heads to try to think how many 1/8 or 1/16th that will be versus taking it as an absolute. If I need to have 72 mm, it is very easy, it is 36 mm, 1/2 is 18 mm and so on. Whereas 72 mm is 2.835”, the fractional portion lies somewhere between 13/16 and 7/8” (14/16”) But then trying to divide those by 2 or 4 creates additional math headaches.

Think of it this way, what size is your car engine? I bet it is in liters of displacement and no one even considers converting that to cu. in. the way engines used to be. JMTCW.

-- Tim, Houston, TX area

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