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Forum topic by dminnery posted 09-30-2017 02:33 AM 340 views 0 times favorited 17 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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dminnery

6 posts in 2117 days


09-30-2017 02:33 AM

Topic tags/keywords: sanding

Hi All,
I’m looking for some solutions to labor intensive hand sanding.

The pieces are small animal shapes (4” approx in 3/4” thick stock).

I cut them on a scroll saw, then use a 1/8” roundover bit in my router table. There is always a little bit of tear out or rough areas that need to be sanded by hand. That is the step I’m trying to address.

So far nothing is as effective as hand sanding, or labor intensive.

I’m thinking there must be something out there that looks similar to that bit but is essentially an abrasive.
Most abrasives like this that I’ve found have a large diameter, 4” and up.

I’ve tried sanding mops, flaps and crosses. Most are too aggressive or can’t get in the tight spots I need.

Any thoughts?


17 replies so far

View Loren's profile

Loren

9423 posts in 3429 days


#1 posted 09-30-2017 02:43 AM

What brand of router bit are you using?

I haven’t made a study of it but many woodworkers
have attested that premium bits tend to yield
cleaner cuts.

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dminnery

6 posts in 2117 days


#2 posted 09-30-2017 02:50 AM

After trying many different brands, I’ve had the best results with Freud.
These shapes are for kids, so the profile needs to be perfectly smooth, hence the sanding.

View bigblockyeti's profile

bigblockyeti

4549 posts in 1501 days


#3 posted 09-30-2017 02:53 AM

I know for half of forever Craftsman sold sanding belts for their 12” handsaw that was pretty narrow, 1/2” or less if I remember. A setup like that would allow the scrolled edges and to a lesser degree, the radii where the top meets the edge.

View Loren's profile

Loren

9423 posts in 3429 days


#4 posted 09-30-2017 03:10 AM

yeah. You might consider using wood filler
on the rough patches and sanding that
back. It might go faster.

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dminnery

6 posts in 2117 days


#5 posted 09-30-2017 03:14 AM

the handsaw kind of puts me back to sanding by hand which is what I want to avoid. Can’t use filler as it’s a toy, plus I’d still have to sand that again which puts me back to square one.

I’m even taking with a guy about a custom helical insert round over bit. I don’t really see that solving the problem because it’s still a blade and will cause tear out.

View AlaskaGuy's profile

AlaskaGuy

3408 posts in 2090 days


#6 posted 09-30-2017 03:21 AM

Deleted

-- Alaskan's for Global warming!

View tomd's profile

tomd

2103 posts in 3551 days


#7 posted 09-30-2017 03:28 AM

How about a rotary tool and the small sanding discs and drums they offer.

-- Tom D

View dminnery's profile

dminnery

6 posts in 2117 days


#8 posted 09-30-2017 03:37 AM

I appreciate all the suggestions.
I have tried every available flap, disc, star sander, wheel, sanding sponge, etc.

I just found a manufacturer that makes an abrasive that would mimic the profile of the round over I use, but the diameter is 4”. Obviously much bigger than your standard router bit diameter.

Trying to get hand sanding results without the labor and time of handsanding. Thinking that this can’t be a new problem something must exist somewhere out there!

View Aj2's profile

Aj2

1123 posts in 1579 days


#9 posted 09-30-2017 03:48 AM

The tear out is the real problem find a way to cut your pieces with minimal hand work.

-- Aj

View TungOil's profile

TungOil

665 posts in 276 days


#10 posted 09-30-2017 03:49 AM

What kind of wood? Can you switch to something less prone to tear out?

-- The optimist says "the glass is half full". The pessimist says "the glass is half empty". The engineer says "the glass is twice as big as it needs to be"

View dminnery's profile

dminnery

6 posts in 2117 days


#11 posted 09-30-2017 04:00 AM

I use hard maple, cherry and walnut. Changing is not really an option.

View Bobthewoodbutcher's profile

Bobthewoodbutcher

19 posts in 890 days


#12 posted 09-30-2017 06:00 AM

Check out http://katools.com/guinevere-minature-finishers/

This is a tool used by many serious scrollsaw workers for rounding edges etc.

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dminnery

6 posts in 2117 days


#13 posted 09-30-2017 06:17 AM

I was looking at that machine, however I read some reviews that indicated it was not very durable.
I use my tools a lot so durability is a factor. On average I get about 10-14 months out of my DeWalt Scroll Saw before they break.

View wuddoc's profile

wuddoc

220 posts in 3499 days


#14 posted 09-30-2017 06:19 AM

Tumbling is a method to round and smooth edges of small parts. Different abrasive media and sizes need to be experimented with in order to determine if this system will work in your application. Following is some information on the internet.

http://thefinishedpart.kramerindustriesonline.com/2009/09/wood-tumbling.html

-- Wuddoc

View AlaskaGuy's profile

AlaskaGuy

3408 posts in 2090 days


#15 posted 09-30-2017 07:21 AM

I might help if we could see a photo of a few of these item with the burn marks on them. Were all kind of shooting the dark with out them.

-- Alaskan's for Global warming!

showing 1 through 15 of 17 replies

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