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12 inch jointer/planer combo as a space saving 12 inch jointer?

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Forum topic by sawdustdad posted 09-30-2017 01:22 AM 1347 views 0 times favorited 12 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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sawdustdad

270 posts in 669 days


09-30-2017 01:22 AM

I have been toying with the idea of adding a 12 inch jointer to the shop but I don’t want to allocate the floor space that a full size 12 inch jointer would require. So I’m thinking about one of the combination planer/jointer machines sold by Jet, Grizzly, etc. As I already have a 20 inch planer, (and a 12 inch woodmaster) I don’t see ever using the machine as a planer, it would be pretty much a dedicated jointer. I have a 6 inch delta jointer that would be used for edge jointing, this new machine would be used to face joint boards wider than 6 inches but no longer than 4 or 5 feet long.

Who has one such machine and what is your advice regarding adding one as a jointer to the shop?

-- Murphy's Carpentry Corollary #3: Half of all boards cut to a specific length will be too short.


12 replies so far

View Loren's profile

Loren

9433 posts in 3432 days


#1 posted 09-30-2017 01:51 AM

I had a Robland XSD for awhile. The tables
were not as flat as they could have been but
I learned to work around it for edge jointing.
For face jointing the imperfect tables were
not a hindrance at all. I met a guy who also
had one who had the tables blanchard ground
for a few hundred bucks.

Short bed 12” jointers have been made in the
past, though tracking one down may be a chore.
If you can accept a 10.25” cutting width an INCA
jointer/planer can be a nice tool. I had one
for awhile and really liked it. I only used it
as a jointer. The early ones had about 30”
beds but later ones were about 42”, which is
adequate for routine jointing of boards up
to about 6’ long. I jointed longer boards
on it but it was a hassle.

The mortising tables that attach to some jointer/planer
combos are pretty cool.

If you’re feeling up to it, plans exist for a home-brew
12” jointer. I’ve seen a few example online with
modest bed lengths. For surfacing you don’t need
a fancy tilting fence either and in fact some old
wider jointers only have 90 degree fences.

View RobS888's profile

RobS888

2285 posts in 1629 days


#2 posted 09-30-2017 03:41 AM

I have the jet 12 inch jointer/planer with helical head. I had a grizzly 6 inch jointer and 12 inch ridgid planer that I sold when I ordered the jet. The only issue I have is with long stock. Say 80 inch door trim.

-- I always suspected many gun nuts were afraid of something, just never thought popcorn was on the list.

View William Shelley's profile

William Shelley

447 posts in 1253 days


#3 posted 09-30-2017 04:16 AM

You need clear space fore and aft of the jointer/planer beds, so why does it matter how short the actual beds are?

-- Woodworking from an engineer's perspective

View runswithscissors's profile

runswithscissors

2514 posts in 1809 days


#4 posted 09-30-2017 04:58 AM

I have the same thing as RobS888. I like it quite a lot, and don’t find switching functions to be a huge hassle. Really like the helical head and carbide cutters. If you check out the Seattle CL, you will find a Jet/Powermatic outlet south of Seattle, in the Auburn area. They have new, supposedly “scratch & dent” machines often. The discounts are huge. But they don’t ship. Not a problem for me, just a 2 hour drive from Bellingham. Can’t tell you their name, as they somehow never mention it. But they are legit. Jut enter whatever tool you are looking for on CL, and they will come up.

They have the 12” Jet combo machine right now, but with straight knives. $1695. Plus other jointers and planers.

-- I admit to being an adrenaline junky; fortunately, I'm very easily frightened

View Andre's profile

Andre

1400 posts in 1590 days


#5 posted 09-30-2017 06:19 AM

I have the Scorpion 12” combo machine, love the jointer but must admit switching to planner a pain! The bad part is always having to lower and raise the base table, but the machine cuts butter smooth with no trace of snipe!
Think I may keep it!

-- Lifting one end of the plank.

View RobS888's profile

RobS888

2285 posts in 1629 days


#6 posted 09-30-2017 11:48 AM



You need clear space fore and aft of the jointer/planer beds, so why does it matter how short the actual beds are?

- William Shelley


I have mine mounted on dual locking wheels. So it is tucked up to the wall until needed.

I have a 9×20 garage, so space and mobility are important.

-- I always suspected many gun nuts were afraid of something, just never thought popcorn was on the list.

View sawdustdad's profile

sawdustdad

270 posts in 669 days


#7 posted 10-02-2017 12:41 AM

The comments about infeed and outfeed space are totally valid. I suppose the long table just occupies part of that space. Umm. Will need to think on this some more… Thanks for the astute observation.

-- Murphy's Carpentry Corollary #3: Half of all boards cut to a specific length will be too short.

View William Shelley's profile

William Shelley

447 posts in 1253 days


#8 posted 10-02-2017 12:52 AM

In my experience, most people won’t need to joint extremely long boards. But planing really long boards is pretty common. Often times if you’re running moulding or face frame material or otherwise thin stock that you want to produce in bulk to be consumed later… it’s not uncommon to be running 10 to 14ft pieces of stock through a planer. And since the hybrid machines do both, you need that clear space.

My J/P hybrid has 89” beds but I left a clear path that would allow me to run stock slightly over 11ft long through it, in either mode. So it “occupies” about 23 feet of space and I’ll probably add a reminder for myself by painting or marking the floor.

I’m not sure how much the 12” J/P hybrids weigh, but my 16” is just shy of 1000lbs and rolling it around wasn’t really an option when I got down to it.

-- Woodworking from an engineer's perspective

View Derek Cohen's profile

Derek Cohen

348 posts in 3752 days


#9 posted 10-03-2017 11:54 AM



I have been toying with the idea of adding a 12 inch jointer to the shop but I don t want to allocate the floor space that a full size 12 inch jointer would require. So I m thinking about one of the combination planer/jointer machines sold by Jet, Grizzly, etc. As I already have a 20 inch planer, (and a 12 inch woodmaster) I don t see ever using the machine as a planer, it would be pretty much a dedicated jointer. I have a 6 inch delta jointer that would be used for edge jointing, this new machine would be used to face joint boards wider than 6 inches but no longer than 4 or 5 feet long.

Who has one such machine and what is your advice regarding adding one as a jointer to the shop?

- sawdustdad

I argued for a 12” combo machine as the best value-for-money jointer in an article in Pop Wood mag about a year ago. In my case I have the Hammer A3-31. The beds can be lengthened with clamp on sections ..

Regards from Perth

Derek

-- Buildiing furniture, and reviewing and building tools at http://www.inthewoodshop.com

View pete724's profile

pete724

39 posts in 593 days


#10 posted 10-10-2017 12:57 PM

Just for face jointing??

Why not a sled?

View sawdustdad's profile

sawdustdad

270 posts in 669 days


#11 posted 10-11-2017 01:36 AM



Just for face jointing??

Why not a sled?

- pete724

Never used a sled, but that’s a great idea. Maybe not as quick as a wide jointer, but would work for the occasional board.

-- Murphy's Carpentry Corollary #3: Half of all boards cut to a specific length will be too short.

View runswithscissors's profile

runswithscissors

2514 posts in 1809 days


#12 posted 10-12-2017 12:33 AM

If I didn’t already have my Jet JP12-HH jointer/planer combo, I’d seriously consider building one like Mathias Wandel’s machines. The 12 (or even 13) inch lunch box planer could be had very reasonably used, and the rest of the parts shouldn’t be terribly expensive. Quite a bit of labor investment, though.

I notice that after the test with the original planer motor (universal, of course), he went to a TEFC induction motor, which of course would be a great improvement—as in quieter, stronger, longer lived, etc.

I think the challenge in such a build would be having everything sufficiently precise to avoid some of the problems even factory-produced machines have sometimes, such as parallelism and co-planarity.

-- I admit to being an adrenaline junky; fortunately, I'm very easily frightened

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