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How do you achieve a finish like this?

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Forum topic by mahdee posted 09-28-2017 12:42 PM 731 views 2 times favorited 9 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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mahdee

3829 posts in 1607 days


09-28-2017 12:42 PM

Topic tags/keywords: question maple finishing

I was looking at this picture and wondered, is it the finishing method or the lighting (professional picture taking) that make this piece so beautiful? I’ve used semi gloss lacquer on tiger maple and this piece puts my project to shame.
Almost forgot the picture :)

-- earthartandfoods.com


9 replies so far

View chrisstef's profile

chrisstef

17031 posts in 2846 days


#1 posted 09-28-2017 01:18 PM

Thats a gorgeous finish. Looks like water based due to the lack of yellowing.

-- Its not a crack, its a casting imperfection.

View CharlesNeil's profile

CharlesNeil

2145 posts in 3710 days


#2 posted 09-28-2017 01:58 PM

First they have some really nice maple , lots of nice curl
most clear finishes will bring out the curl… However an oil can really help, BUT BUT BUT , most oils tend to yellow . When I wrote my finishing book , we tested about every oil we could get our hands on. I tested them on glass, came back 6 months later and most had yellowed. The one that yellowed the least ( almost Nothing) was Formbys tung oil, oddly enough ( its not really tung oil)

I will also say that not all lacquers are the same , While I cant specifically say WHY , of any lacquer I have ever used the one that seems to give the look you have and really brings out the figure its “Deft”. It just makes wood glow.
If it were me I would do the deft and call it a day . No oil just the deft.
For the first coat , thin it some and either brush or wipe it on, you want to work it deep into the grain, to give that added Chatoyance .. Here is a video on it https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_laRR95IZac&t=53s

You do not want to use a trace coat, on a natural finish like this, the trace can get in the curl and discolor it .

View mahdee's profile

mahdee

3829 posts in 1607 days


#3 posted 09-28-2017 02:15 PM

Thank you very much. I have plenty of Deft to try it on.

-- earthartandfoods.com

View Joe Lyddon's profile

Joe Lyddon

9979 posts in 3891 days


#4 posted 09-28-2017 09:02 PM

COOL Procedure!

If the Lacquer layer was not done, wouldn’t the Coloring tend to get more INTO the wood, would be darker, and last longer?

Just curious… why the Lacquer?

-- Have Fun! Joe Lyddon - Alta Loma, CA USA - Home: http://www.WoodworkStuff.net ... My Small Gallery: http://www.ncwoodworker.net/pp/showgallery.php?ppuser=1389&cat=500"

View Aj2's profile

Aj2

1178 posts in 1637 days


#5 posted 09-28-2017 10:08 PM

I believe I could get that look with fresh blonde shellac it would take some time but just as nice. I also believe the only reason it still looks white is its a new finish give it time it will yellow. All maple turns a tan yellow

-- Aj

View Kazooman's profile

Kazooman

870 posts in 1792 days


#6 posted 09-28-2017 10:41 PM

Just a word of caution about pictures in general. First, you have no idea what the settings were on the camera that took the picture. I am certain that most of us have nice digital cameras (or even phones) that offer settings such as “landscape”, “daylight”, “vivid”, etc. These settings would have a huge impact on how the actual picture file was recorded. Was the piece under incandescent light?, fluorescent light?, daylight? Then there is the issue of how (if at all) the picture was digitally processed prior to being posted. I am a real Photoshop novice, but I could add a ton of yellowing to that image in a heartbeat. I could also make it appear much lighter or darker. A few tweaks to the contrast would make the differences between the light and dark areas change dramatically. Chatoyance? It can be added in Photoshiop (to a degree). Then there is the actual calibration of the viewer’s monitor. Is your monitor actually calibrated to a color standard? Probably not, unless the user is into photography as a hobby besides woodworking.

That said, the featured box is beautiful! Incredible wood and incredible craftsmanship. Trying to match the finish from an Internet picture. Not so easy. Caveat emptor.

View William Shelley's profile

William Shelley

479 posts in 1309 days


#7 posted 09-28-2017 10:44 PM



Just a word of caution about pictures in general. First, you have no idea what the settings were on the camera that took the picture. I am certain that most of us have nice digital cameras (or even phones) that offer settings such as “landscape”, “daylight”, “vivid”, etc. These settings would have a huge impact on how the actual picture file was recorded. Was the piece under incandescent light?, fluorescent light?, daylight? Then there is the issue of how (if at all) the picture was digitally processed prior to being posted. I am a real Photoshop novice, but I could add a ton of yellowing to that image in a heartbeat. I could also make it appear much lighter or darker. A few tweaks to the contrast would make the differences between the light and dark areas change dramatically. Chatoyance? It can be added in Photoshiop (to a degree). Then there is the actual calibration of the viewer s monitor. Is your monitor actually calibrated to a color standard? Probably not, unless the user is into photography as a hobby besides woodworking.

That said, the featured box is beautiful! Incredible wood and incredible craftsmanship. Trying to match the finish from an Internet picture. Not so easy. Caveat emptor.

- Kazooman

Chatoyance can also be amplified by carefully positioning lights with respect to the camera (and the workpiece), since it’s essentially a reflection of wood fibers at a certain angle. If you can get light to hit the fibers the way you want it can make a “good” piece of wood look “incredible”.

-- Woodworking from an engineer's perspective

View shipwright's profile

shipwright

7783 posts in 2637 days


#8 posted 09-28-2017 11:57 PM

My go to is French polish. With proper surface prep (pore filling) you can achieve a very deep clear finish with lots of pop in the grain. Shellac alone will do the popping. The polish is for the depth

.

-- Paul M ..............If God wanted us to have fiberglass boats he would have given us fibreglass trees. http://thecanadianschooloffrenchmarquetry.com/

View mahdee's profile

mahdee

3829 posts in 1607 days


#9 posted 09-29-2017 12:47 AM

wow shipwright, and the rest of the comments. I’ve tried several ways so far and the best result was neutral min-wax oil stain. I have to give shellac a try next. This is going to be a knife holder so I assume it will be standing vertical on a wall. As it relates to the light angle, I have no idea but that certainly is going to be a major contributing factor. Charles’ suggestion is very good as well. I thinned the lacquer more than 50/50 and was able to wipe it on as he suggested. Here are some results of different finishes:

-- earthartandfoods.com

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