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Forum topic by harrison17 posted 09-28-2017 01:23 AM 756 views 0 times favorited 38 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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harrison17

22 posts in 78 days


09-28-2017 01:23 AM

Topic tags/keywords: question plane jointer traditional modern finishing joining

Two part question…

First I’m gearing up to order a Lie-Nielsen jointer, either a 7 or 8. The largest plane I have now is an older Stanley #6. I like the idea of the 8, but in practice I’m worried it’s too wide to edge joint 3/4” which is what I mainly work with, but sometimes thinner. I’m not worried about pushing the weight around. This is making me lean towards a 7 though since it seems a little more versatile since I’d like to be able to use it on 1/2” material if I needed to. Am I over-analyzing it? I’ve never used a plane larger than my 6.

Second part kind of depends on the first. I bought my first LN plane a few months ago and love it. I got a 4-1/2 and I use it way more than my Stanley #4. I feel like my #4 is too light now so I’m always reaching for the 4-1/2. I opted for the standard frog instead of a higher angle and put a slight back bevel on it when dealing with tricky grain with works for the most part. Am I missing out not having a dedicated higher angle frog? If I order a 7 then should I order a 50 or 55 degree frog and swap with the 4-1/2 or not worry about it since I use the 4-1/2 so much and it’s not just for dedicated situations? So many options!

Thanks for any help!! Also, first post.


38 replies so far

View marc_rosen's profile

marc_rosen

126 posts in 3018 days


#1 posted 09-28-2017 01:44 AM

Hey Harrison,
I have the #4 and the #8 and also an old Stanley #7 That #7 feels like it weighs substantially less than the LN#8 and some times I prefer the 7 because of its “lightness”. Since you point out that the frogs are interchangeable in the #7 & #41/2 I would easily choose the #7. I doubt you would ever wish you had gone for the extra width, length, and weight. (However I wish I had bought the #41/2)

-- Windsurfing, Woodworking, Weaving, and Woodducks. "Most woodworkers are usually boring holes"

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bandit571

18628 posts in 2520 days


#2 posted 09-28-2017 02:01 AM

Steven: I answered this over on the other site.

A #4-1/2, a #5-1/2, a #6 and the #7 all take the same sized frogs, width-wise. And the same width irons. The only things that change would be the length of each plane, and the weight.

-- A Planer? I'M the planer, this is what I use

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Smitty_Cabinetshop

14847 posts in 2455 days


#3 posted 09-28-2017 02:13 AM

If you’re at all thinking an eight is what you really want -over a seven- then get the eight. You won’t regret it. Personal experience using an eight for edging narrow stock is ‘non-issue.’ It is, as with many things, what you get used to.

-- Don't anthropomorphize your handplanes. They hate it when you do that. -- OldTools Archive --

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harrison17

22 posts in 78 days


#4 posted 09-28-2017 02:15 AM



Hey Harrison,
I have the #4 and the #8 and also an old Stanley #7 That #7 feels like it weighs substantially less than the LN#8 and some times I prefer the 7 because of its “lightness”. Since you point out that the frogs are interchangeable in the #7 & #41/2 I would easily choose the #7. I doubt you would ever wish you had gone for the extra width, length, and weight. (However I wish I had bought the #41/2)

- marc_rosen

Sounds like the 7 is the best choice. Thanks for the opinion and it’s never too late for you to pick that 4-1/2

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TheFridge

8303 posts in 1323 days


#5 posted 09-28-2017 02:21 AM

As far as the frogs go, i got a 55 deg with the 4-1/2 and a 7 with a standard. I just keep the 55 in the smoother. Never felt the need to swap.

-- Shooting down the walls of heartache. Bang bang. I am. The warrior.

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ColonelTravis

1679 posts in 1731 days


#6 posted 09-28-2017 02:57 AM


If you re at all thinking an eight is what you really want -over a seven- then get the eight. You won t regret it. Personal experience using an eight for edging narrow stock is non-issue. It is, as with many things, what you get used to.

- Smitty_Cabinetshop

Ditto, I don’t understand the trepidation about 8s. #8 is 2 pounds heavier than a #7 but the difference in width between a 7 and 8 is negligible. I’ve flattened the edge of 1/4” boards with my 8. But everyone ain’t me and Smitty. You get what you think is best – a LN 7 is a fine instrument.

I work crazy grain wood a lot, I think a high angle jointer would be beneficial if you were doing things like long panels or large tables. I haven’t built really large things out of crazy grain wood so it’s not necessary for me.

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harrison17

22 posts in 78 days


#7 posted 09-28-2017 02:57 AM



If you re at all thinking an eight is what you really want -over a seven- then get the eight. You won t regret it. Personal experience using an eight for edging narrow stock is non-issue. It is, as with many things, what you get used to.

- Smitty_Cabinetshop

Yours is the little voice in the back of my head telling me to look at the 8

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mitch_56

18 posts in 310 days


#8 posted 09-28-2017 02:58 AM

I have the LN #7 with a 50 degree frog and I love it. Deep and abiding love. Very highly recommended. I also have an old Stanley #7 that I use a lot, too.

As for weight, I’m the wrong person to ask. I think it’s a personal thing. I’m about 230 lbs, and carry a lot of weight in my upper body. My arm and shoulder together probably weigh at least 20 lbs, so planing with both arms == 40 lbs… if I’m moving a 4 lb #4 or an 8 lb #7…44 lbs vs 48 lbs…not a noticeable difference, and the difference shrinks if we add in other upper body mass into the mix. I can use a #7 all day just as easily as a #4. But for someone else, perhaps with a slight build, maybe a very big difference.

As for the balance issue, I don’t think it’s a concern at all. If you can plane a # 4 1/2 on a 1/2” edge, you can use a #7 even easier, because there’s more sole length in contact with that edge on which to balance. Use the fingertips of your “front hand” (the hand that might otherwise be on the front knob) against the face of the board you’re edge jointing and also tucked up against the sole of the plane with just your thumb on the sole directly over the edge to be jointed. Seems to work for me, ymmv.

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harrison17

22 posts in 78 days


#9 posted 09-28-2017 03:04 AM


If you re at all thinking an eight is what you really want -over a seven- then get the eight. You won t regret it. Personal experience using an eight for edging narrow stock is non-issue. It is, as with many things, what you get used to.

- Smitty_Cabinetshop

Ditto, I don t understand the trepidation about 8s. #8 is 2 pounds heavier than a #7 but the difference in width between a 7 and 8 is negligible. I ve flattened the edge of 1/4” boards with my 8.

But everyone ain t me and Smitty. You get what you think is best – a LN 7 is a fine instrument.

- ColonelTravis

You’re not the first person I’ve heard praise the 8. The size doesn’t scare me. Just didn’t know if I was getting greedy in wanting that over the 7

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harrison17

22 posts in 78 days


#10 posted 09-28-2017 03:05 AM



As far as the frogs go, i got a 55 deg with the 4-1/2 and a 7 with a standard. I just keep the 55 in the smoother. Never felt the need to swap.

- TheFridge

I actually found your post about liking the 55 deg frog and that’s one of the reasons I made this post. Do you use it all the time or just for knarly grain?

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harrison17

22 posts in 78 days


#11 posted 09-28-2017 03:10 AM



I have the LN #7 with a 50 degree frog and I love it. Deep and abiding love. Very highly recommended. I also have an old Stanley #7 that I use a lot, too.

As for weight, I m the wrong person to ask. I think it s a personal thing. I m about 230 lbs, and carry a lot of weight in my upper body. My arm and shoulder together probably weigh at least 20 lbs, so planing with both arms == 40 lbs… if I m moving a 4 lb #4 or an 8 lb #7…44 lbs vs 48 lbs…not a noticeable difference, and the difference shrinks if we add in other upper body mass into the mix. I can use a #7 all day just as easily as a #4. But for someone else, perhaps with a slight build, maybe a very big difference.

As for the balance issue, I don t think it s a concern at all. If you can plane a # 4 1/2 on a 1/2” edge, you can use a #7 even easier, because there s more sole length in contact with that edge on which to balance. Use the fingertips of your “front hand” (the hand that might otherwise be on the front knob) against the face of the board you re edge jointing and also tucked up against the sole of the plane with just your thumb on the sole directly over the edge to be jointed. Seems to work for me, ymmv.

- mitch_56

I’m about 6’ 215lbs and my wife tells me I’m built like a cartoon character so I can relate to what you’re saying. The size doesn’t scare me. I really hadn’t considered using the 7 with a high angle frog, only swapping it to the 4-1/2. One more thing to think about, thanks Mitch

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harrison17

22 posts in 78 days


#12 posted 09-28-2017 03:12 AM



Steven: I answered this over on the other site.

A #4-1/2, a #5-1/2, a #6 and the #7 all take the same sized frogs, width-wise. And the same width irons. The only things that change would be the length of each plane, and the weight.

- bandit571

Thanks for the feedback

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ColonelTravis

1679 posts in 1731 days


#13 posted 09-28-2017 03:25 AM

Don’t know what Fridge will say but I use my 4 1/2 with a 55 degree frog all the time, have three blades for it. Love planes with big mass. Grain I use 99% of the time – mesquite (insane), walnut (can be insane), normal cherry, poplar. My poor #4 Millers Falls, which I loved to use, sits a lot now. Sold a 604, as well. My MF was the first bench plane I ever bought, won’t sell it.

One key to help you with a 7 or 8: Plane with your legs. If you run it like a scrub you’ll be out of breath in no time!

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harrison17

22 posts in 78 days


#14 posted 09-28-2017 03:32 AM



Don t know what Fridge will say but I use my 4 1/2 with a 55 degree frog all the time, have three blades for it. Love planes with big mass. Grain I use 99% of the time – mesquite (insane), walnut (can be insane), normal cherry, poplar. My poor #4 Millers Falls, which I loved to use, sits a lot now. Sold a 604, as well. My MF was the first bench plane I ever bought, won t sell it.

One key to help you with a 7 or 8: Plane with your legs. If you run it like a scrub you ll be out of breath in no time!

- ColonelTravis

That’s good to know. Does it make it harder to reach the depth knob with the 55 deg frog?

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ColonelTravis

1679 posts in 1731 days


#15 posted 09-28-2017 03:32 AM

This doesn’t help you now, which stinks, but if you ever get the chance to go to an annual L-N handtool event – go. They bring everything they make to try out. I live nowhere near Maine, so I never get to see their stuff up close and personal until they come to me. I’ve been to two and it was a huge help in decision-making. I think Highland in ATL sells their stuff? Not sure if you’re near them.

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