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tenons table saw vs band saw?

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Forum topic by Damian Penney posted 2338 days ago 5962 views 0 times favorited 19 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Damian Penney

1140 posts in 2589 days


2338 days ago

Topic tags/keywords: tenons

How do folk like to cut their tenons ? For my bench I’m thinking of doing the tenons on the bandsaw, while Chris Schwarz does his with a dado blade on the table saw. What are the pros and cons to these two methods?

I have a dado blade but because the threads on my arbor aren’t flat the cutters lie at slightly different heights so I don’t really like using it (think I’ve only used it once since I bought it) but if there is a compelling reason to use it over the bandsaw I will. I also own a big cast iron tenon jig that I’ve used all of once because it seemed such a pain to setup (if I recall correctly).

-- I am always doing that which I can not do, in order that I may learn how to do it. - Pablo Picasso


19 replies so far

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cowboy

68 posts in 2385 days


#1 posted 2338 days ago

Well it depends on how accurate you are with the band saw.It can be very difficult to cut these perfectly,to say the least.However myself I slow down and have learned to be pretty dog gone accurate and save a bunch of time which I then can use on areas that really show.But before anyone gets silly these are very accurate

Cowboy

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SPalm

4750 posts in 2479 days


#2 posted 2338 days ago

Last time I cut some; I scored the shoulders on the TS with a standard blade and then cut the cheeks on the BS. You have some pretty big pieces to score (crosscut) here, so it will be interesting to see how you end up doing it.

-- -- I'm no rocket surgeon

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Damian Penney

1140 posts in 2589 days


#3 posted 2338 days ago

Most likely badly :)

-- I am always doing that which I can not do, in order that I may learn how to do it. - Pablo Picasso

View jeremy's profile

jeremy

53 posts in 2376 days


#4 posted 2338 days ago

You can do them on your table saw without the dado blade if you want to. Just do it with the regular blade and start at the shoulder and nibble away the material to the end. I usually use a dado, but if I only have a couple to make i’ll do it this way. I usually leave about 1/8 inch between each cut and then clean it up with a chisel.

-- Jeremy, Saratoga, NY

View brunob's profile

brunob

2275 posts in 2767 days


#5 posted 2338 days ago

I use the table saw because of the increased accuracy. I (like Jeremy) use a regular blade unless I have several to make.

-- Bruce from Central New York...now, if you'll pardon me, I have some sawdust to make.

View TampaTom's profile

TampaTom

74 posts in 2351 days


#6 posted 2338 days ago

Gosh – both ways can be very accurate – and I’ve done ‘em both ways.

I guess find a way that works best for you and stick with it….

-- Tom's Workbench - http://tomsworkbench.com

View Scott Bryan's profile

Scott Bryan

27251 posts in 2419 days


#7 posted 2338 days ago

Table saw. I just haven’t gotten the accuracy I want out of my band saw.

-- Challenges are what make life interesting; overcoming them is what makes life meaningful- Joshua Marine

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Damian Penney

1140 posts in 2589 days


#8 posted 2338 days ago

The standard blade I have on my tablesaw is an ATB blade so it leaves a little v where it cuts so nibbling seems like a pain, and since I’m building the Holtzapffel bench with its 3” x 5” tenons nibbling an 1/8” at a time would take forever :)

If there isn’t a really compelling reason to use the TS think I’ll stick with my instincts and do the shoulders on the TS and the cheeks on the bandsaw; I’ve never had a problem getting accurate cuts on it so hopefully it will go well. I’ll keep you posted on my bench blog

-- I am always doing that which I can not do, in order that I may learn how to do it. - Pablo Picasso

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jeremy

53 posts in 2376 days


#9 posted 2338 days ago

sounds good,

-- Jeremy, Saratoga, NY

View Damian Penney's profile

Damian Penney

1140 posts in 2589 days


#10 posted 2338 days ago

Love the TR3 Bruce, is that yours? My Dad owned a TR2 for a while, and my first car was a Spitfire followed by a TR6, super fun cars :) The TR2 was designed so that you could touch the road with your hand from inside the car, no doubt to pick up anything that fell off :)

-- I am always doing that which I can not do, in order that I may learn how to do it. - Pablo Picasso

View teenagewoodworker's profile

teenagewoodworker

2727 posts in 2365 days


#11 posted 2338 days ago

well you could use both. you could cut the shoulders on the table saw and then set up that band saw with a straight edge to remover the rest of the material. also remember to use a stop block on the fence so you can stop it perfectly every time. it will save a lot of wear and tear on your table saw blade from all that nibbling.

also remember that setting up a bandsaw fence is different then a regular fence. it has a slight angle. there is a good band saw set up video by the wood whisperer and about 12 minutes into that video he talks about setting up the fence. here’s the link and good luck.

http://link.brightcove.com/services/link/bcpid1344664476/bclid1344621875/bctid1344587157

View Dorje's profile

Dorje

1763 posts in 2594 days


#12 posted 2338 days ago

Go with your gut – you know what you’re doing. And, you know why you’re doing it.

-- Dorje (pronounced "door-jay"), Seattle, WA

View USCJeff's profile

USCJeff

1044 posts in 2665 days


#13 posted 2338 days ago

I use a TS shop-built jig. I cut the vertical cuts with it and use a miter fence to cut off the waste.

I’ve seen many who score with a table saw so that the BS will track the score.

No one’s mentioned it yet, but there is a school of people that I’ve seen use a str8 bit or spiral bit on a router table as well. My opinion is that all of these will work with a similar result. Matter of preference, I believe.

-- Jeff, South Carolina

View 8iowa's profile

8iowa

1489 posts in 2358 days


#14 posted 2338 days ago

I have a tennonmaster jig, but I’m not going to use it anymore. Having a long rail sticking up in the air, supported only by a clamp at the bottom, and then running this through the table saw without a guard, gives me an uneasy feeling. Whenever I’m uncomfortable with a cut, I try to find another way. Fortunately, my bandsaw has a fence and a miter gauge slot so I can accurately cut tennons much more safely. Actually, If I only have a couple to do, I can cut them by hand on my bench. A good tennon saw is a handy tool to have in your shop. We don’t always have to have a power tool solution.

-- "Heaven is North of the Bridge"

View Alin Dobra's profile

Alin Dobra

350 posts in 2485 days


#15 posted 2337 days ago

Damian,

I have the Grizzly tenoning jig (56$ or so) and it does a very good job. I can tune it up so it shaves a tiny amount to finetune the tenon width. While you can cut the tenons on the bandsaw, you probably need a good shoulder plane to tune the tenon. Since the jig is so cheap, I think it is not justified to build a tenoning jig or to go with an improvisation.

If I use the tablesaw, I cut the support of the tenon with a crosscut fence on the tablesaw and then the sides of the tenon with the tenoning jig. The dado blade makes too much of a mess.

Alin

-- -- Alin Dobra, Gainesville, Florida

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