LumberJocks

Jointer Help!

  • Advertise with us

« back to Woodworking Skill Share forum

Forum topic by Jeff82780 posted 01-31-2011 01:11 AM 1493 views 2 times favorited 7 replies Add to Favorites Watch
View Jeff82780's profile

Jeff82780

204 posts in 2456 days


01-31-2011 01:11 AM

What is causng this to happen to the wood when i run it through my jointe. This is my first jointer and I am confused as all hell. Please help!


7 replies so far

View Mark Shymanski's profile

Mark Shymanski

5314 posts in 3174 days


#1 posted 01-31-2011 01:27 AM

If you are talking about the linear bumps of wood running the length of the wood; that suggests that you have one or more nicks in your jointer blades. Wherever the nick is it does not cut wood as deep as where the blade is good so it leaves that ridge. You may be able to offset your jointer blades a wee bit to ‘hide’ the nick. At some point you will either have to reshape and sharpen the blades, or replace them. I just did this to my jointer and within moments of replacing the blades I nicked the new ones!!! I was severely bent out of shape!

-- "Checking for square? What madness is this! The cabinet is square because I will it to be so!" Jeremy Greiner LJ Topic#20953 2011 Feb 2

View live4ever's profile

live4ever

983 posts in 2471 days


#2 posted 01-31-2011 01:38 AM

Yup, like Mark said, nicks in the blades. You can solve the problem by offsetting the knives (as long as the nick in each blade isn’t in the same spot, you won’t end up with ridges). HOWEVER, if you have not set jointer knives before, be warned that it can be a frustrating project that requires several hours.

-- Optimists are usually disappointed. Pessimists are either right or pleasantly surprised. I tend to be a disappointed pessimist.

View Jeff82780's profile

Jeff82780

204 posts in 2456 days


#3 posted 01-31-2011 02:27 AM

They are brand new blades though. I just put the jointer togrther today and right out of the box the linear bumps were appearing.

View HorizontalMike's profile

HorizontalMike

7143 posts in 2375 days


#4 posted 01-31-2011 03:39 AM

Is this a spherical cutter head?

-- HorizontalMike -- "Woodpeckers understand..."

View Jeff82780's profile

Jeff82780

204 posts in 2456 days


#5 posted 01-31-2011 05:18 AM

u guys were right. i moved the fence in an inch and now the marks are gone! Thanks everyone. However, I have Another question. when I run the board through the jointer I notice that at the last inch or so of the board (about when the board just leaves the infeed table and ready to hit the outfeed table) I either get a bunch of tearout or the cut is more shallow than the rest of the board. What am I doing wrong. Are my tables not set up right? Is my technique wrong? I was also wondering, when i change blades, does it matter what manufacturer i get them from?

-Jeff

View live4ever's profile

live4ever

983 posts in 2471 days


#6 posted 02-02-2011 12:29 AM

Jeff -

Sounds like you are getting snipe. It could be something as simple as technique OR a problem with the tables OR a problem with the height of the knives relative to the outfeed table.

If a picture is worth a thousand words, a video is worth millions. This may help:

http://thewoodwhisperer.com/jointer-setup/

-- Optimists are usually disappointed. Pessimists are either right or pleasantly surprised. I tend to be a disappointed pessimist.

View jmichaeldesign's profile

jmichaeldesign

66 posts in 2244 days


#7 posted 02-02-2011 01:13 AM

If you’re getting snipe it sounds like your outfeed table is set up too low. I learned to joint boards by using the infeed table mostly for initial support, but using the outfeed table to really support the piece after starting the cut. Simply put make sure the fence is square to the outfeed table. After you start your cut put downward pressure over the outfeed table and only the outfeed table. If your tables are slightly out of alignment you will still get a perfect edge as long as the knives and the outfeed table are perfectly aligned. On short boards (no longer than the infeed table) it is easiest to put the cupped edge or face of the board on the table. On longer boards it is important to put the crowned face or edge of the board on the table. If the crown is severe enough that it cannot be straightened in one pass, make sure that you make a flat spot on the crown and continue to register the board on this flat spot. People will often tell you that you cannot flatten a board more than 1.5 to 2 times the length of your jointer, but using this technique I’ve been able to repeatedly joint boards up to 3 times the length of a jointer. It takes some getting used to, I find outfeed support like rollers to be too crude for accurate results, but a helper on the outfeed side can be useful if they know just to support the weight of the board and not to pull at all, but let you feed the board.

Have your say...

You must be signed in to reply.

DISCLAIMER: Any posts on LJ are posted by individuals acting in their own right and do not necessarily reflect the views of LJ. LJ will not be held liable for the actions of any user.

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

HomeRefurbers.com