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Table saw top dust collection--side arm or integreated with splitter (ie Shark Guard)

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Forum topic by d38 posted 09-25-2017 11:20 PM 2597 views 0 times favorited 12 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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d38

21 posts in 42 days


09-25-2017 11:20 PM

Now that I have my Grizzly 2hp dust collector set up, I’m cutting some boards, and rapidly learning table top collection is important!
TS is a ~1997 Delta Contractor. I taped up the big hole in the back, and slot on front tilt adjustment. Splitter/safety guard disposed of long ago (I know, bad idea). I’m making a mobile base for it, but it hasn’t moved since I put it in the new garage in 2011.
Stock DC using 4” hose into the bottom of my TS—-most likely converting to 2-stage this fall.
Surfing finds 2 basic types—side arm, and those integrated with the splitter.
Either one will work well in my shop. Its a matter of which one works better, and easier to use.
What are the pros and cons of each? I’m new to all of this DC stuff, so appreciate the help.

Penn State has their side arm style on sale for $159.99
https://www.pennstateind.com/store/TSGUARD.html

Shark Guard looks like a good device—and I get the splitter back with it. But since its built to order, wouldn’t get one for several weeks.
http://thesharkguard.com/index.html


12 replies so far

View Loren's profile

Loren

9422 posts in 3428 days


#1 posted 09-25-2017 11:24 PM

Overarm guards work for non-through
cuts like dados. Some guys hate guards
and may find an overarm guard more
tolerable.

View jmos's profile

jmos

784 posts in 2150 days


#2 posted 09-25-2017 11:32 PM

I have and like the SharkGuard, but have never used the overarm type, which looks pretty good too. In my opinion, you have to have a splitter at minimum (better a riving knife.) So, even if you go with the Penn State type, I’d still recommend installing some sort of splitter. IMO, it’s foolish not to have some kickback protection.

-- John

View jonah's profile

jonah

1258 posts in 3079 days


#3 posted 09-25-2017 11:48 PM

I have the ARK Sharkguard, and it’s great. It does require some lead time, since Lee makes them to order.

At some point, I’ll be making my own overarm setup to keep the hose above the table. For now, I haven’t needed it really, and I love the adjustable riving knife.

View Fred Hargis's profile

Fred Hargis

4641 posts in 2273 days


#4 posted 09-26-2017 04:31 PM

I had a Shark on my Unisaw, and switched to an Excalibur when i found a used one art a fair price. I liked the Shark better. It was a little more handy (mine was on a Bies snap-in splitter clamp) and did a better job catching dust. I threatened to put it back on, but wound up selling the Unisaw and let the Shark go with it.

-- Our village hasn't lost it's idiot, he was elected to congress.

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jonah

1258 posts in 3079 days


#5 posted 09-26-2017 05:09 PM

The only negative I’ve found with the shark guard is that you can’t remove it entirely without having to re-align it with the blade when you put it back on. If there were some way to remove the riving knife while leaving the bracket aligned perfectly with the blade, that’d be ideal.

Otherwise it’s been great.

View d38's profile

d38

21 posts in 42 days


#6 posted 09-27-2017 12:16 AM

After seeing your replies above, and more internet surfing, looks like the Shark Guard ARK version is the way to go for my Delta 34-444 model TS. One knife, always mounted, so spare knives to get lost. And when I’m not using the TS, I can lower the blade and knife below the top and use it as a work surface—which happens quite a bit.
How many users also get the anti-kickback pawls? Maybe for $15 they’re worth adding to the order.
Thanks for everyone’s inputs.
Wayne

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Fred Hargis

4641 posts in 2273 days


#7 posted 09-27-2017 10:51 AM

Let the safety police howl, but I always take those kickback guards off. But that’s just me.

-- Our village hasn't lost it's idiot, he was elected to congress.

View Leeway's profile

Leeway

37 posts in 2256 days


#8 posted 09-29-2017 03:53 PM



The only negative I ve found with the shark guard is that you can t remove it entirely without having to re-align it with the blade when you put it back on. If there were some way to remove the riving knife while leaving the bracket aligned perfectly with the blade, that d be ideal.

Otherwise it s been great.

- jonah

We do make the ARK knives for the Delta brackets that have an open slot on the bottom. This was done for those guys that seem to find a way to need to remove the knife occasionally. ;) Even then the block doesn’t need to be removed. Just the hex bolt and spring loaded orange handle. Still not as convenient as the open slot. Not everyone and especially new guys and students need to remove the knife. It can be left in place and a dado blade installed and used.

I won’t publish it on the site because I think it is safer with the slot closed especially with the possibility of blade contact if the blade is raised while it is spinning. Even then the block doesn’t need to be removed. Just the hex bolt and spring loaded orange handle. We have done it in testing here and a couple of guys have done it in the field and the damage was a few sparks and a riving knife that had some material sliced off. Carbide will cut stainless steel. The hardware that we use is strong enough to hold the knife in place if it does get some impromptu machining done to the arc of the knife.
You are welcome to cut your own knife slot with a hack saw if you need or we will sell you a replacement after explaining the safety issue.

-- Lee

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jonah

1258 posts in 3079 days


#9 posted 09-29-2017 04:28 PM

I don’t mean to imply that I’m not happy with my SG, Lee. It’s been fantastic so far, and the dust collection at the blade has been superb with a 2 1/2” port. I went through a situation where I had to cut a new insert and I ended up having to remove the SG altogether. Just a minor annoyance. I ended up ordering a 10” Freud calibration disc that will make it super easy to align the SG perfectly when I do have to remove it in the future.

On the whole, I can’t recommend the SG highly enough, especially for older saws like mine.

View Leeway's profile

Leeway

37 posts in 2256 days


#10 posted 09-29-2017 05:01 PM

Thanks, Jonah.
If you need to make the throat plate cuts on the table saw, then the riving knife slot should be cut before the installation of the ARK. That can certainly get overlooked and cause more installation time. I personally think it is safer to make the knife slot with a jigsaw or scroll saw, but not everyone will have those available.
They can be done with the table saw blade though. Plenty of videos on YouTube about this.

-- Lee

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jonah

1258 posts in 3079 days


#11 posted 09-29-2017 06:00 PM

I actually did end up doing the cuts with a jigsaw. The phenolic material is tough stuff, and even with a brand new Bosch blade I ended up with a pretty ragged, crooked cut on the insert. Doesn’t affect the function any, as its just the part of the opening for the riving knife, but it was tough to cut. The problem I ran into is that I couldn’t get the insert on to try it without having some extra clearance around it, due to the way Delta’s inserts have a tab in the front that has to slip in at an angle. If I’d just cut that tab off I probably would have ended up in a better spot.

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Leeway

37 posts in 2256 days


#12 posted 09-29-2017 06:48 PM

The guy that did the video on the ARK for me had planned on doing a couple more.
One specifically about throat plates. Busy guy.
With a jig saw, you would cut from the bottom of the plate using a bimetal blade. Probably 14 teeth per inch.
Phenolic is still nasty stuff to cut or machine. You are correct that a little more clearance needs to be allowed behind where the knife will be. Trial and error right now. We will be making our own throat plates very soon out of prefinished bamboo flooring. They will already have a knife slot relief underneath so that you only have to cut thin material to finish. They will be ordered according to blade tilt direction too.
Currently setting up the machine that will be making those. Maybe another month to get through R&D and testing.

-- Lee

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