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Questions about where to put my new Nova 1624 lathe

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Forum topic by David Smith posted 09-24-2017 01:49 PM 1398 views 0 times favorited 25 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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David Smith

16 posts in 292 days


09-24-2017 01:49 PM

Topic tags/keywords: nova lathe

I just bought a Nova 1624 lathe from Woodcraft in OKC and will be picking it up on the way to visit family next week. It’s a present from my wife for finishing a 7-year remodeling project on our house. I have a some questions maybe y’all can answer:

First, I was planning to put it on a built-in bench I already have in the shop. It’s a little too high, but I plan to build a platform to stand on so I’m not standing on concrete while using the lathe. The downside to using the bench may be that if I ever get the outrigger for larger bowls, the bench may get in the way (the bench extends across the entire wall). Which is better—putting it on the bench or using the legs?

Second, if I use the legs, I’m planning to bolt the lathe to the floor. I read in another post that doing this may not be enough to stabilize the lathe and that extra weight would be needed to reduce vibration. What experience have you had with this?

Third, have any of you found a good reason to buy the bed extension other than kitchen table legs?

Thanks in advance for your responses.

-- David


25 replies so far

View LeeMills's profile

LeeMills

437 posts in 1081 days


#1 posted 09-24-2017 03:02 PM

I’ve had mine for about 10 years so this is just my experience; I do use the legs that come with it.

A bench may make it more difficult to clean under the ways. I would be a little leery of building a platform to stand on just because I tend to get forgetful now. I trip easily enough as it is.
A bench would probably get in the way of an outrigger. That said, I did buy the outrigger when I bought mine and a few years ago sold it at a $100 loss; the only thing it was ever used for was to hold the knock-out bar and for that it was great. If you want to turn larger items I will direct you to a video that shows a different approach which is much better IMHO at the same or lower cost. The different approach would allow you to have an outrigger when needed as well as bed extension when needed.

I have not bolted mine down or added ballast. If you bolt it down it will probably be difficult to adjust the height.
After adjusting the feet properly (as per Lyle Jamieson video) about 60% of initial vibration was removed. It does still shake sometimes but nothing major. I have thought of adding ballast but if I do I would add a heavy angle iron bracket across the legs then a stout shelf between. Add bags of sand as you wish…pretty cheap. I also thought of adding a bar at each end and keep my eyes out for free work-out weights (normally 120 lbs sets?) on Craigslist.

I haven’t needed the bed extension. That said I do swivel the headstock almost 100% of the time when hollowing a bowl. As well as a more comfortable stance the tool handles will not hit the tailstock. If you do not swivel the headstock you may need to remove the tailstock to give clearance to longer tool handles.

-- We cannot solve our problems with the same thinking we used when we created them. Albert Einstein

View RobS888's profile

RobS888

2284 posts in 1625 days


#2 posted 09-24-2017 05:15 PM

I don’t use a lathe, but I’m an enabler for my wife. She has the same lathe and I would suggest you try it on the floor using the legs first to see how much area you need for your various stances. My wife would need at least a 4’x5’ platform. Making larger bowls requires large sweeping motions for the insides and spindle work would require moving pretty far down the lathe.

On the legs the lathe would bounce around a bit. Mostly with rough blanks until cut round. We built a large base from a magazine that has triple layers of 3/4 plywood, with 160lbs of sand in the base.

-- I always suspected many gun nuts were afraid of something, just never thought popcorn was on the list.

View David Smith's profile

David Smith

16 posts in 292 days


#3 posted 09-24-2017 08:47 PM

Thanks for the replies…

So I’m reaching three conclusions: First, start with the legs. Second, I’m probably better off adding ballast if I need it rather than bolting it down. Third, I probably don’t need to get too antsy about buying the outrigger.

I’m looking forward to getting started with this. After 40+ years of making cabinets, remodeling, and doing a few furniture pieces on the side, this is my first venture into turning since my 1968 junior high woodshop class when I made a horrendous-looking lamp (that I think my mother still has).

-- David

View Rick_M's profile

Rick_M

10254 posts in 2160 days


#4 posted 09-24-2017 08:53 PM

You didn’t mention and probably already thought about lighting, but I like both direct and indirect light for lathe work. A window is perfect, and/or a bright light overhead + task light.

-- http://thewoodknack.blogspot.com/

View David Smith's profile

David Smith

16 posts in 292 days


#5 posted 09-24-2017 08:59 PM

Good point. I’m planning to put a shop light above the lathe. Is a two-bulb florescent sufficient or should I look for something more?

-- David

View putty's profile

putty

1128 posts in 1387 days


#6 posted 09-24-2017 09:05 PM

I just looked up the lathe, It looks nice except for one thing…manual belt change for changing speeds, that would be a deal breaker for me. If you haven’t picked it up yet, I’m sure you can upgrade to a lathe with a variable speed.

-- Putty

View fredj608's profile

fredj608

2 posts in 772 days


#7 posted 09-24-2017 09:10 PM

David, I also like an an articulated light that I can swing around to “almost” any position to light the work-piece from top or side or glancing light. It helps in looking for little scratches or grain tear before finishing a piece.

View David Smith's profile

David Smith

16 posts in 292 days


#8 posted 09-24-2017 09:23 PM



I just looked up the lathe, It looks nice except for one thing…manual belt change for changing speeds, that would be a deal breaker for me. If you haven t picked it up yet, I m sure you can upgrade to a lathe with a variable speed.

- putty

I don’t disagree with you, but this was the best I could get for the $1000 my wife gave me. Like most woodworkers, I’ve got so much on my wish list, I can’t justify spending any more on the lathe.

-- David

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David Smith

16 posts in 292 days


#9 posted 09-24-2017 09:24 PM



David, I also like an an articulated light that I can swing around to “almost” any position to light the work-piece from top or side or glancing light. It helps in looking for little scratches or grain tear before finishing a piece.

- fredj608

Any recommendations on a brand?

-- David

View LeeMills's profile

LeeMills

437 posts in 1081 days


#10 posted 09-24-2017 09:41 PM

The video (he is using the Nova DVR) show the outboard tool rest starting about 3:45. For the few time either way mount the bed extension on the rest for outboard turning or on the lathe for long spindles, it’s only four bolts.

EVS is very nice but I never change speeds on spindles and usually only once on bowl/platters, Once in a blue moon I may change twice on bowls.

I agree with Fred on the light. You can get a nice articulating desk lamp with a long arm for about $20 and mount to the wall. I use a long goose neck with a small but very bright halogen. Being able to bring the light down to a “glancing” position really shows scratches or defect not easily visible for overhead light. Think of it as casting shadows. It also works greats for lighting the interior of bowls or other deep forms. You need overhead light also but IMHO it can be almost anything.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ydDQQQww1AA

-- We cannot solve our problems with the same thinking we used when we created them. Albert Einstein

View David Smith's profile

David Smith

16 posts in 292 days


#11 posted 09-24-2017 10:05 PM



The video (he is using the Nova DVR) show the outboard tool rest starting about 3:45. For the few time either way mount the bed extension on the rest for outboard turning or on the lathe for long spindles, it s only four bolts.

EVS is very nice but I never change speeds on spindles and usually only once on bowl/platters, Once in a blue moon I may change twice on bowls.

I agree with Fred on the light. You can get a nice articulating desk lamp with a long arm for about $20 and mount to the wall. I use a long goose neck with a small but very bright halogen. Being able to bring the light down to a “glancing” position really shows scratches or defect not easily visible for overhead light. Think of it as casting shadows. It also works greats for lighting the interior of bowls or other deep forms. You need overhead light also but IMHO it can be almost anything.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ydDQQQww1AA

- LeeMills

Thanks. Makes sense…

I showed that video to my wife. I think she’s having second thoughts now, especially the chainsaw part.

-- David

View LeeMills's profile

LeeMills

437 posts in 1081 days


#12 posted 09-24-2017 10:52 PM


.
Thanks. Makes sense…

I showed that video to my wife. I think she s having second thoughts now, especially the chainsaw part.

;) Can’t blame her. I did think the tool rest was a good idea…. the chainsaw and rasp definitely Not. Like all videos .. take the good parts and discard the bad.

-- We cannot solve our problems with the same thinking we used when we created them. Albert Einstein

View TheDane's profile

TheDane

5299 posts in 3443 days


#13 posted 09-24-2017 10:54 PM

Don’t know what your budget is, but you cannot beat Ken Rizza’s lathe lamps …
https://woodturnerswonders.com/collections/lamps

-- Gerry -- "I don't plan to ever really grow up ... I'm just going to learn how to act in public!"

View RobS888's profile

RobS888

2284 posts in 1625 days


#14 posted 09-24-2017 11:28 PM


I just looked up the lathe, It looks nice except for one thing…manual belt change for changing speeds, that would be a deal breaker for me. If you haven t picked it up yet, I m sure you can upgrade to a lathe with a variable speed.

- putty

I don t disagree with you, but this was the best I could get for the $1000 my wife gave me. Like most woodworkers, I ve got so much on my wish list, I can t justify spending any more on the lathe.

- David Smith


Later on you can get the DVR motor upgrade. My wife got it after about 5 years and loves it. I think it was $600. That still is a lot less than the DVR lathe was.

-- I always suspected many gun nuts were afraid of something, just never thought popcorn was on the list.

View MrUnix's profile

MrUnix

5801 posts in 1979 days


#15 posted 09-24-2017 11:32 PM

manual belt change for changing speeds, that would be a deal breaker for me.
- putty

That is a selling point for me :)

Belts and pulleys last forever and are cheap and easy to replace when/if needed.

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - In Dog I trust... everything else is questionable

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