LumberJocks

Jewelry box construction advice needed.....

  • Advertise with us

« back to Woodworking Skill Share forum

Forum topic by carolinagene posted 09-24-2017 01:42 PM 1067 views 0 times favorited 5 replies Add to Favorites Watch
View carolinagene's profile

carolinagene

6 posts in 441 days


09-24-2017 01:42 PM

When cutting miters for jewelry boxes using 3/8” or 1/2” wood, do you guys use a power miter saw or a table saw? What type blade do you use? Thanks!


5 replies so far

View TheFridge's profile

TheFridge

9608 posts in 1511 days


#1 posted 09-24-2017 02:00 PM

Table saw. Better accuracy. 60t blade.

-- Shooting down the walls of heartache. Bang bang. I am. The warrior.

View splintergroup's profile

splintergroup

2075 posts in 1247 days


#2 posted 09-24-2017 03:21 PM

+1 on the table saw, fine tooth blade, back stop on the miter gauge. Test cuts and and good square to verify the angles, stop block to keep the lengths equal.

Another “trick” I use is for the stop block to register off of the point when cutting the opposite angle. If the point of your workpiece is used, it can get easily deformed and affect the length.

This is not to dismiss a well tuned miter saw which can produce excellent cuts of course 8^)

View pontic's profile

pontic

591 posts in 633 days


#3 posted 09-24-2017 04:36 PM

+2 for Table saw 60T blade.

-- Illigitimii non carburundum sum

View ArtMann's profile

ArtMann

950 posts in 841 days


#4 posted 09-24-2017 06:14 PM

I would never use a miter saw for this purpose. Mine isn’t accurate enough. I always sue a table saw. I use a 90 tooth fine finish crosscut blade.

View bc4393's profile

bc4393

67 posts in 1167 days


#5 posted 09-25-2017 03:32 AM

+1 on test cuts. I thought i had a 45 degree cut using a drafting triangle but somehow I was off a couple degrees . Found it when i did a test cut and checked with with combo square. Hate to give up the old school way but a wixey digital angle gage is in my future.


+1 on the table saw, fine tooth blade, back stop on the miter gauge. Test cuts and and good square to verify the angles, stop block to keep the lengths equal.

Another “trick” I use is for the stop block to register off of the point when cutting the opposite angle. If the point of your workpiece is used, it can get easily deformed and affect the length.

This is not to dismiss a well tuned miter saw which can produce excellent cuts of course 8^)

- splintergroup


Have your say...

You must be signed in to reply.

DISCLAIMER: Any posts on LJ are posted by individuals acting in their own right and do not necessarily reflect the views of LJ. LJ will not be held liable for the actions of any user.

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

HomeRefurbers.com