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Forum topic by gliderider posted 09-24-2017 12:25 PM 461 views 0 times favorited 18 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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gliderider

4 posts in 25 days


09-24-2017 12:25 PM

Topic tags/keywords: tablesaw

Hello all
New to the forum so just a few things about myself then my question. I’m 61 going on 29. I’m a avid do it yourselfer. have done some woodworking projects in the past and just finished hanging a cabinet i made for the garage. I have the tools i need to do most of the projects up till now. I want to take on building kitchen cabinets for the house. nothing real fancy, i have i guess what you would call a galley kitchen so no corner cabinets. The problem i have is two fold. I have a crappy 100 dollar 10 inch table saw and not a lot of space. I have a two car garage but i cant dedicate a wood shop for the space i have. So i don’t want a full size table saw. I was looking at what they call contractor saws but i want to choose one that can handle the cabinet project. any advice on what brand and features to look for would be very helpful. Any advice at all.

Thanks


18 replies so far

View WhyMe's profile

WhyMe

879 posts in 1341 days


#1 posted 09-24-2017 01:29 PM

Do you mean a jobsite saw instead of a contractor saw? Contractor saw takes up a fair amount of room.

If it is a contractor saw that you want, I’d go with the Grizzly or Delta. I’d stay away from the Ridgid or Craftsman because of the bad blade alignment history. Jobsite style, I’d go with Bosch or Dewalt.

View toolie's profile

toolie

2088 posts in 2409 days


#2 posted 09-24-2017 01:33 PM

Mobile bases enable me to put a full workshop on wheels (10” table saw, 13” planer, 1.5 hp delta dust collector, 18” rikon band saw, 6” jointer , 10” radial arm saw, 16-32 ryobi drum sander, 2 roll around tool chests, stationary bench, full height 40” wide tool storage cabinet and roll around bench) and still fit a a Volvo C 70 in the one car car 12×20 garage. So if you dont need to leave your tools set up in one bay, you can have a full size 10” CI table saw and almost anything else you want in the way of tools.

If complete portability outside the shop is required, then Ridgid makes an excellent portable 10 inch contractors saw that will do all the fine cabinetry that you want to do.

-- there's a solution to every problem.......you just have to be willing to find it.

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bonesbr549

1436 posts in 2847 days


#3 posted 09-24-2017 01:34 PM

First of all welcome to he house! As to contractor .vs. Cabinet saws, and there have been a lot of threads on this forum and others, they occupy about the same space. Get a Cabinet saw, and put it on a good brand mobile cart and you can slide it around easily. You don’t mention budget, so that will go a long way in determining your options.

If you have time then, watch the CL’s and searchtempest.com and an old american piece of Iron will show up at a good price.

If budget is more flexible, I’d highly recommend the Sawstop PCS, it provides the quality and safety aspect. I’ve had all models over the years of TS’s from the desktop lowe’s POS, to shopsmith to contractor to cabinet saw, to my current sawstop.

Start with the cabinet saw you won’t regret it. Good luck and cheers

-- Sooner or later Liberals run out of other people's money.

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johnstoneb

2560 posts in 1953 days


#4 posted 09-24-2017 02:21 PM

Sawstop jobsite or contractors saw. I would probably go with the contractors.

-- Bruce, Boise, ID

View woodify's profile

woodify

252 posts in 1852 days


#5 posted 09-24-2017 03:12 PM

I also have a $100 table saw in a small shop and I’m looking to upgrade. I’ve been thinking about something that can handle cabinets too. My current table saw can only cut 12 inches so I’ve been using a straight edge and a circular saw to cut my cabinet parts—this is a very slow process. I’ve been looking at this Dewalt table saw as it is compact but can expand out to 32.5 inches. I’m thinking it will fit well in my small shop and when I need to rip some cabinet parts I’ll have a capability.

-- Woodify ~~ https://www.youtube.com/woodified

View knotscott's profile

knotscott

7725 posts in 3156 days


#6 posted 09-24-2017 03:26 PM


I also have a $100 table saw in a small shop and I m looking to upgrade. I ve been thinking about something that can handle cabinets too. My current table saw can only cut 12 inches so I ve been using a straight edge and a circular saw to cut my cabinet parts—this is a very slow process. I ve been looking at this Dewalt table saw as it is compact but can expand out to 32.5 inches. I m thinking it will fit well in my small shop and when I need to rip some cabinet parts I ll have a capability.

- woodify

The DW will likely be better than a $100 cheapy benchtop saw, but it’ll still have some similar limitations due to size, weight, and materials of construction. The area in front of the blade will still be very small compared to a full size cast iron contractor saw or hybrid saw. With a little ingenuity, it’s often possible to make the full size saw work even in a small shop.

-- Happiness is like wetting your pants...everyone can see it, but only you can feel the warmth....

View gliderider's profile

gliderider

4 posts in 25 days


#7 posted 09-24-2017 05:27 PM

Thanks for all your suggestions. And yes i did mean a job site saw. my objective to a job site saw is that i can roll it into my shed when I’m not using it. I just don’t know about the quality and accuracy of these saws. I have looked at the Rigid and Bosch saws. They are brand name saws, just want to avoid buying something that’s not going to do the job. what about skill and OK masterforce sold by Menards.

View TheFridge's profile

TheFridge

7939 posts in 1266 days


#8 posted 09-24-2017 05:32 PM

Trash.

-- Shooting down the walls of heartache. Bang bang. I am. The warrior.

View gliderider's profile

gliderider

4 posts in 25 days


#9 posted 09-24-2017 05:32 PM

Oh buy the way as far as budget go’s I’m thinking for a good quality saw 5 to 6 hundred.

View retfr8flyr's profile

retfr8flyr

359 posts in 1449 days


#10 posted 09-24-2017 05:48 PM

With your space limitations and for what you are wanting to do, I would offer a different suggestion. Keep your $100 TS for making smaller cuts, just upgrade the blade and fence for better, more accurate cuts. Then get an Festool MTF3 https://www.festoolusa.com/products/semi-stationary-work/multifunction-table/495315---mft3#Overview and an Makita track saw https://www.makitatools.com/products/details/SP6000J1 You will be able to make precision cuts to build you cabinets and still be able to store everything in your shed, if you want. Watch some youtube videos on how versatile and precise you can be with the MTF3 and a track saw. The Makita fits the Festool track, it’s what I use and does a great job.

-- Earl

View WhyMe's profile

WhyMe

879 posts in 1341 days


#11 posted 09-24-2017 05:51 PM

I’d stick with either Bosch or Dewalt. I’ve used a friends Bosch 4100 and really liked it.

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runswithscissors

2514 posts in 1805 days


#12 posted 09-24-2017 09:54 PM

I would never give a vehicle precedence over woodworking tools. That’s just twisted values. Let the damned cars sit in the rain.

-- I admit to being an adrenaline junky; fortunately, I'm very easily frightened

View Loren's profile

Loren

9422 posts in 3428 days


#13 posted 09-24-2017 10:06 PM


Oh buy the way as far as budget go s I m thinking for a good quality saw 5 to 6 hundred.

- gliderider

A contractor saw from Sears or Home Depot
will be adequately sized to make cabinets. The
table sizes are comparable to 10” cabinet saws.
They aren’t especially space-efficient to store
however.

Portable benchtop style table saws, even those
with folding stands, tend to have smaller tables
and fence capacities, which is convenient on
jobsites but not so useful for dimensioning the
24×30” panels used for base cabinet sides.

For breaking full sheets of plywood up for cabinet
parts track saw setups like the Eurekazone system
do a good job and store in a small space.

View MrUnix's profile

MrUnix

5801 posts in 1979 days


#14 posted 09-24-2017 10:21 PM

Unless you absolutely need it to be portable (like throw in the back of a pickup truck portable), I’d stay away from the jobsite saws… light weight plastic enclosures, small tables (usually made out of aluminium), universal screamer motors that will melt if pushed too hard, etc… Look for something with a cast iron top and real belt driven induction motor. One of the more popular saws in your price range is the Delta, so you may want to look into that. Lots of options if you include used saws that can be found on your local Craigslist.

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - In Dog I trust... everything else is questionable

View JBrow's profile

JBrow

1236 posts in 700 days


#15 posted 09-25-2017 02:23 AM

gliderider,

It is unclear to me that you need to buy a new table saw to construct a set of kitchen cabinets. No doubt there is nothing like a full sized and largely immovable table saw in producing accurate and consistent cuts in a wide variety of material. Anything less can be a significant compromise. If the only project confronting me was limited to building a set of kitchen cabinets then I am not sure that I would spend money on a new table saw that meets these limited, essentially one-time use requirements.

I am also unclear why your current table saw does not meet at least some of your needs. When building kitchen cabinets, the table saw comes in handy when cutting narrow stock like that which would become the face frame, drawer fronts, and rails and stiles for doors. If your table saw can rip solid hardwood to yield straight and parallel edges, I fail to see a reason to replace it, although a quality saw blade may be in order.

The other aspect where a good table saw comes in handy is breaking down plywood to properly dimensioned stock. Breaking down sheet goods seems to work best when the table saw offers a generous table size, which I suspect your existing table does not offer. Therefore an alternative to your existing saw may be required; but a new and bigger table saw may not be your only option.

One alternative to a new table saw when dimensioning sheet goods is a track saw system. Some of these systems can be pricey while others cost less and either is comparable to the price of a good contractor’s or hybrid table saw. The major negative with a track saw system is that great care is required when laying out cuts to ensure that plywood panels of the same size with edges that are square are produced, but with some tricks like careful layout and double cutting identically sized parts, the tracks saw can work well. A significant advantages of a track saw system is that it stows easily and is very versatile.

Your existing saw may not be up to challenge of forming dados and rabbets you may wish to introduce to the kitchen cabinet project. But this task can be accomplished with a router, either handheld or mounted in a router table.

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