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Forum topic by Bags posted 01-29-2011 05:08 PM 1718 views 0 times favorited 8 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Bags

38 posts in 2971 days


01-29-2011 05:08 PM

Topic tags/keywords: question jig

I want to make some wooden nuts and bolts (approximately 100 in total). Each nut needs to be 1.75 inches across and .75 inches thick (the threaded core will be .625 in diameter). Does anyone have any ideas on how to cut the 6 sides in a safe and time efficient way? The Beall Tool Company web site has an idea posted but it isn’t clear how the jig is built and it does seem a little inefficient and a little unsafe. I have searched the web and haven’t been successful in finding any ideas.

Any help would be much appreciated.


8 replies so far

View Gene Howe's profile

Gene Howe

8236 posts in 2888 days


#1 posted 01-29-2011 06:14 PM

How about building a dedicated sled to capture a 1.75 square and run the corners through the TS or BS?
You could pre drill the hole and use a dowel on which to spin the little square. To capture the work piece, angled stops on the sled would work. Similar to a miter sled, but smaller. You’ have to remove and turn and replace the piece after each cut.
Or, if you can, use a 1.75X1.75 length of stock and bevel each corner on the TS, then slice the “nuts” off. But, then you are drilling into end grain. Don’t know how that would affect your threads.

-- Gene 'The true soldier fights not because he hates what is in front of him, but because he loves what is behind him.' G. K. Chesterton

View TopamaxSurvivor's profile

TopamaxSurvivor

17654 posts in 3136 days


#2 posted 01-30-2011 01:16 AM

I would just cut them on a table saw. Figure the width of stock for 2 sides, cut the blocks off at an angle. Make a small sled with an angle and a stop for the next batch of cuts. Now, one end of the nut is pointy and you have one more cut to make. Modify the sled stop to hold the pieces. The angle is the same.

-- Bob in WW ~ "some old things are lovely, warm still with life ... of the forgotten men who made them." - D.H. Lawrence

View Steve Peterson's profile

Steve Peterson

324 posts in 2542 days


#3 posted 01-30-2011 02:21 AM

I would start with a long piece of 1.75” thick stock and rip the sides to 30 degrees. Then set a stop block at 0.75” on your miter saw and start chopping. This way, the last cut is a siimple square cut with a long piece to hold on to.

-- Steve

View TopamaxSurvivor's profile

TopamaxSurvivor

17654 posts in 3136 days


#4 posted 01-30-2011 02:24 AM

Are these suppose to be end grain nuts?

-- Bob in WW ~ "some old things are lovely, warm still with life ... of the forgotten men who made them." - D.H. Lawrence

View David Kirtley's profile

David Kirtley

1286 posts in 2458 days


#5 posted 01-30-2011 06:57 AM

Drill the holes along the length of board and tap them.

Cut into individual nut blanks.

Mount on a threaded rod protruding from fixture clamped to your saw of choice. Have a clamp that holds it from spinning.

Make cut, roate, (for all six sides)

-- Woodworking shouldn't cost a fortune: http://lowbudgetwoodworker.blogspot.com/

View Bags's profile

Bags

38 posts in 2971 days


#6 posted 01-30-2011 03:39 PM

Thanks for everyone’s response!

View Bags's profile

Bags

38 posts in 2971 days


#7 posted 01-30-2011 03:42 PM

TolamaxSurvivor – Thanks for the response and no they are not end grain.

View Jim Finn's profile

Jim Finn

2408 posts in 2382 days


#8 posted 01-30-2011 06:31 PM

This issue may be the reason that very old nuts are square.

-- "You may have your PHD but I have my GED and my DD 214"

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