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Forum topic by keef_ca posted 09-22-2017 12:45 PM 433 views 0 times favorited 19 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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keef_ca

8 posts in 84 days


09-22-2017 12:45 PM

Topic tags/keywords: question mitre saw blades

hello all

My spiffy new Dewalt mitre saw was shipped with a Dewalt 60tpi “fine finishing” blade. Is this appropriate for general use? I was told to get a combination blade, either 40 or 60tpi.

I inherited a new and really nice Freud so right now the 60 is my go-to blade. I do only small projects, nothing really demanding or fine (yet….). Right now a lot of 2×4 and plywood projects. No ripping.

Do I need an another blade?

thanks, guys

Bj


19 replies so far

View Firewood's profile

Firewood

164 posts in 1471 days


#1 posted 09-22-2017 12:58 PM

Yuo dont need a combo blade sine a miter saw is inherently a crosscut saw. The 60 tooth that came with is fine for general purpose work. There are blades made specifically for miter saws and cross cut operations. if your Freud blade fits that catagory, save it for when you need extra clean cuts.

-- Mike - Waukesha, WI

View Mainiac Matt 's profile

Mainiac Matt

7462 posts in 2166 days


#2 posted 09-22-2017 01:16 PM

Circular saw blades are not rated by tpi (teeth per inch), but rather the total number of teeth. And the # teeth needed for smooth cuts depends greatly on the blade diameter.

Are you talking about 10” or 12” blades?

-- Pine is fine, but Oak's no joke!

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keef_ca

8 posts in 84 days


#3 posted 09-22-2017 01:21 PM


Are you talking about 10” or 12” blades?

They are 12” blades. The Freud is 100tpi so I’m saving that for future projects as my skills develop. Although I may use it for a molding job I have coming up.

Thanks, BJ

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keef_ca

8 posts in 84 days


#4 posted 09-22-2017 05:07 PM

thanks for the info

View William Shelley's profile

William Shelley

479 posts in 1307 days


#5 posted 09-22-2017 06:31 PM

I know I’m being super pedantic here, but as Matt mentioned, “tpi” (teeth per inch) is not how circular saw blades are measured. You just count the total teeth. So a 60-tooth blade has 60 teeth around the rim.

If you had a 12” blade that had 100 teeth per inch, it would have 3,800 teeth. I don’t think you want that.

It may seem like an irrelevant distinction, but it will save you a lot of embarassment and/or confusion later on if you get it right now. Otherwise, you might ask for a “24 tpi blade” and someone will hand you a reciprocating blade for cutting metal.

-- Woodworking from an engineer's perspective

View CharlesA's profile

CharlesA

3294 posts in 1635 days


#6 posted 09-22-2017 08:37 PM

I keep a 12” 80 tooth blade on mine all the time, and I’m amazed how well it has held up (Freud). I only pull out another blade if I’m doing a lot of treated lumber. Otherwise, it does walnut and 2×4’s.

-- "Man is the only animal which devours his own, for I can apply no milder term to the general prey of the rich on the poor." ~Thomas Jefferson

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patcollins

1605 posts in 2702 days


#7 posted 09-22-2017 08:57 PM

If you are cutting 4×4’s or decking boards you are probably going to want a general purpose blade but for trim work you are going to want a trim blade. Match the blade to what you are cutting, not what type of saw you are using.

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CharlesA

3294 posts in 1635 days


#8 posted 09-22-2017 09:01 PM



If you are cutting 4×4 s or decking boards you are probably going to want a general purpose blade but for trim work you are going to want a trim blade. Match the blade to what you are cutting, not what type of saw you are using.

- patcollins


True, but at least in my case, changing my miter saw blade is a pain, so I keep my 80 tooth on there unless I’m building a deck or the like. I’d rather change a bandsaw blade . . . twice.

-- "Man is the only animal which devours his own, for I can apply no milder term to the general prey of the rich on the poor." ~Thomas Jefferson

View keef_ca's profile

keef_ca

8 posts in 84 days


#9 posted 09-23-2017 12:48 AM



If you are cutting 4×4 s or decking boards you are probably going to want a general purpose blade but for trim work you are going to want a trim blade. Match the blade to what you are cutting, not what type of saw you are using.

- patcollins

What is different about a trim blade? Before I spend $90 I really want to be sure of things. In a few cuts I made the Freud made some ultra smooth trim cuts.

always somthiing I guess

Bj

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keef_ca

8 posts in 84 days


#10 posted 09-23-2017 01:04 AM



If you are cutting 4×4 s or decking boards you are probably going to want a general purpose blade but for trim work you are going to want a trim blade. Match the blade to what you are cutting, not what type of saw you are using.

- patcollins

Matching the blade and not the saw is good advice. I checked my 12” Diablo and they say its good for furniture making and so on….to trim. I’m fortunate.

thanks, Bj

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keef_ca

8 posts in 84 days


#11 posted 09-23-2017 01:11 PM


If you had a 12” blade that had 100 teeth per inch, it would have 3,800 teeth. I don t think you want that.

- William Shelley

Good call. I totally missed that one. 3,800 teeth would be excessive.

Bj

View Gene Howe's profile

Gene Howe

9768 posts in 3266 days


#12 posted 09-23-2017 01:49 PM

You’ll get the best results from a blade made specifically for miter saws. The tooth angle is different. Mine’s a 10” and it’s an 80 tooth. But, it hasn’t seen construction lumber.
Stay away from thin kerf blades. Too much deflection in a 10” and, I’d imagine it’d be worse with a 12”.
If you want a better blade, consider Tenryu. Better grade of carbide, more of it, balanced and lasts far longer between sharpenings.

-- Gene 'The true soldier fights not because he hates what is in front of him, but because he loves what is behind him.' G. K. Chesterton

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keef_ca

8 posts in 84 days


#13 posted 09-23-2017 02:00 PM


Stay away from thin kerf blades. Too much deflection in a 10” and, I d imagine it d be worse with a 12”.
If you want a better blade, consider Tenryu. Better grade of carbide, more of it, balanced and lasts far longer between sharpenings.

- Gene Howe

as I sat comfortable that my Diablo thin kerf blade was a good purchase. I just cannot get this right.

I had a couple of cheap big box store blades (Rona like HD) that I just gave away thinking all I needed was my Dewalt blade the mitre saw was shipped with and my new Diablo.

I need a break from all this….

Bj

View CharlesA's profile

CharlesA

3294 posts in 1635 days


#14 posted 09-23-2017 02:10 PM

The deflection of thin kerf blades, imho, is a bit overblown.

-- "Man is the only animal which devours his own, for I can apply no milder term to the general prey of the rich on the poor." ~Thomas Jefferson

View Gene Howe's profile

Gene Howe

9768 posts in 3266 days


#15 posted 09-23-2017 03:04 PM



The deflection of thin kerf blades, imho, is a bit overblown.

- CharlesA


It happens a lot with angled cuts in thicker (8/4) hardwoods. Not so much with 90 degree cuts.

-- Gene 'The true soldier fights not because he hates what is in front of him, but because he loves what is behind him.' G. K. Chesterton

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