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What type and color of frame should this have?

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Forum topic by PPK posted 09-21-2017 03:32 PM 1279 views 0 times favorited 16 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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PPK

870 posts in 647 days


09-21-2017 03:32 PM

Topic tags/keywords: question art

I have very little artistic bent. If anybody has opinions on what type of frame this art should have, I’d sure appreciate it.

I’m a big fan of Arts and Crafts / Mission stuff, and I’d like to do a frame in that style, but don’t know if it’d look good.

The painting is an oil painting on canvas. 16” x 20”

Edit: Also, how do you attach a canvas into the picture frame? The painting obviously has its own little wooden frame the the canvas is stretched around… Think I should put a mat around it? Sorry, Like I said above, I’m not a big art connoisseur…

-- Pete


16 replies so far

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papadan

3584 posts in 3206 days


#1 posted 09-21-2017 03:44 PM

I think I would go with something like knotty pine in a rustic style.

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ColonelTravis

1680 posts in 1731 days


#2 posted 09-21-2017 03:46 PM

I love Western art and you’ll find it framed in everything from gold-leaf fancy pants crazy carved stuff to a simple miter. I’ve got many Western prints to frame up, I’m using mesquite and cherry. Style for me – just a KISS miter. But QSWO would look good with that, get a stain to match the browns. Some A&C style is a little too much and it gets a little Asian looking, which is nice. But your Buffalo aren’t in Asia. If you go that route, I’d keep it something like this, which I think would work well:

Also pine like papadan said. Or that blue pine if you can find it.

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PPK

870 posts in 647 days


#3 posted 09-21-2017 03:55 PM

Oh hey, PapaDan, do ‘ya know where this art represents?? hee hee

Thanks for the advice :)

-- Pete

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papadan

3584 posts in 3206 days


#4 posted 09-21-2017 04:01 PM



Oh hey, PapaDan, do ya know where this art represents?? hee hee

Thanks for the advice :)

- PPK


Uhhhhh…. a prairie somewhere?

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gwilki

170 posts in 1311 days


#5 posted 09-22-2017 03:29 PM

As the others have said, your best bet for a frame would be something simple, stained in a brown close to the darkest browns in the piece.

On a 16×20 piece, I would suggest a frame of 2.5 to 3” wide. That’s my taste, so you may like them larger. Smaller, though, will really not work, IMNSHO.

As to matting, you don’t mat oils. You mat drawings and watercolours. You can go with a linen liner around the piece if you like. You can buy them commercially done and that’s how I get mine. I’ve tried various methods to make them, and none worked well.

As to mounting it in the frame, you cut the rabbet in the frame members anywhere between 1/8 and 1/4 deeper than the thickness of the stretchers. Since you don’t want to take away from the piece, you can cut the rabbet so that it covers about 1/8” of the piece all the way around. That’s plenty to support it. That way, the stretchers sit into the frame. Then you use clips to hold the piece in. There are many kinds of clips available – metal and plastic. Some screw in, some are glued on.

I’m sure you will get conflicting advice, but I’ve done hundreds of these, and this is what I’ve ended up with as a good approach.

-- Grant Wilkinson, Ottawa ON

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PPK

870 posts in 647 days


#6 posted 09-22-2017 03:38 PM



As the others have said, your best bet for a frame would be something simple, stained in a brown close to the darkest browns in the piece.

On a 16×20 piece, I would suggest a frame of 2.5 to 3” wide. That s my taste, so you may like them larger. Smaller, though, will really not work, IMNSHO.

As to matting, you don t mat oils. You mat drawings and watercolours. You can go with a linen liner around the piece if you like. You can buy them commercially done and that s how I get mine. I ve tried various methods to make them, and none worked well.

As to mounting it in the frame, you cut the rabbet in the frame members anywhere between 1/8 and 1/4 deeper than the thickness of the stretchers. Since you don t want to take away from the piece, you can cut the rabbet so that it covers about 1/8” of the piece all the way around. That s plenty to support it. That way, the stretchers sit into the frame. Then you use clips to hold the piece in. There are many kinds of clips available – metal and plastic. Some screw in, some are glued on.

I m sure you will get conflicting advice, but I ve done hundreds of these, and this is what I ve ended up with as a good approach.

- gwilki

Thank you for the advice! I think I understand what you’re saying here. Makes sense about the mat – I’ve been poking around on the internet, and I couldn’t figure out how to make a mat look good on an oil painting!! Always good to hear from someone that’s been there done that and knows what he’s talkin about!

-- Pete

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waho6o9

8030 posts in 2414 days


#7 posted 09-22-2017 03:45 PM

Maybe get some beetle kill blue pine:

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PPK

870 posts in 647 days


#8 posted 09-22-2017 04:20 PM

I’ve drawn it out on paper to get a feel for the proportions… I’ve got some nice white oak planks my dad gave me. White oak looks pretty nice in brown dye. I think it’ll look like this:

-- Pete

View splintergroup's profile

splintergroup

1701 posts in 1060 days


#9 posted 09-22-2017 06:41 PM

Consider the layout of your ebony pegs. Aligning with the corner, as your sketch depicts, works better with pictures that have more geometric content. Aligning across the angle (as with the Colonel’s image) lends better to a painting with more “soft” details.

Nitpicky I know, just one of those refining “details”.

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PPK

870 posts in 647 days


#10 posted 09-22-2017 06:54 PM



Consider the layout of your ebony pegs. Aligning with the corner, as your sketch depicts, works better with pictures that have more geometric content. Aligning across the angle (as with the Colonel s image) lends better to a painting with more “soft” details.

Nitpicky I know, just one of those refining “details”.

- splintergroup

Dude, that’s awesome! This is why I call upon the experts. I’ll make that change. Thanks! I may just have a nice frame here, with no merit of my own, but thanks to you guys!

-- Pete

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gwilki

170 posts in 1311 days


#11 posted 09-23-2017 01:06 AM

PPK: From your drawing, your frame members are 7/8 or 1” thick. The depth of your rabbet should be the thickness of your stretcher + 1/8 -1/4”. That puts the back of your frame proud of the back of the stretcher.

I am assuming that your frame is half lap, correct? That’s the only way that I can see that style of frame working. The backs of the frame members have to be flush with each other so that the stretcher fits into the dado.

-- Grant Wilkinson, Ottawa ON

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ColonelTravis

1680 posts in 1731 days


#12 posted 09-23-2017 02:42 AM

You’‘l have a nice frame.
Just curious – where’s the painting from?

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PPK

870 posts in 647 days


#13 posted 09-24-2017 01:34 AM



PPK: From your drawing, your frame members are 7/8 or 1” thick. The depth of your rabbet should be the thickness of your stretcher + 1/8 -1/4”. That puts the back of your frame proud of the back of the stretcher.

I am assuming that your frame is half lap, correct? That s the only way that I can see that style of frame working. The backs of the frame members have to be flush with each other so that the stretcher fits into the dado.

- gwilki

yep, I understand. I guess I just didn’t specify it right. The frame on the painting is only about 5/8” thick. So it should fit into a 7/8 or 1” frame real easy.

-- Pete

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PPK

870 posts in 647 days


#14 posted 09-24-2017 01:36 AM



You l have a nice frame.
Just curious – where s the painting from?

- ColonelTravis

Col Trav,
Its my cousin. I commissioned her to paint this for me. This is the first time I’ve ever done something like this. We used to borrow art from our local library (which is awesome) and my family and I really liked one of their buffalo paintings. So last year I decided to hit up my cousin who I know is a good artist. Now I have an original… When this picture was taken, she had not put her signature on it yet.

-- Pete

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ColonelTravis

1680 posts in 1731 days


#15 posted 09-24-2017 03:38 AM

That’s great, Pete. Thanks. Looks like a George Catlin-kinda buffalo. I stink as a painter but have tried a few times. Last one was of Monument Valley. Not good enough to frame.

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