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Forum topic by MrsN posted 01-28-2011 06:00 AM 3951 views 0 times favorited 16 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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MrsN

975 posts in 2992 days


01-28-2011 06:00 AM

I have been doing a bit more sanding lately, and have noticed my eyes are not completely happy with the change. I always wear safety glasses, but I was thinking about getting a pair of goggles to keep out more of the airborne dust.
Do any of you have experience/recommendations for goggles? I have nightmares about the awful goggles from science class that are uncomfortable and leave a red ring around your face with hair tangled in the elastic cord. Are there better options?
Thanks for your input
MrsN

-- ----- www.KNWoodworking.com ----- --


16 replies so far

View Jonathan's profile

Jonathan

2608 posts in 2517 days


#1 posted 01-28-2011 05:03 PM

Are you using any sort of dust collection while you’re doing the sanding? I’m assuming you’re also wearing some sort of dust mask as well? If you were to use some sort of dust collector, that would help both your eyes and lungs, plus keep your work area cleaner overall.

Is it hand sanding, power sanding, or both? Even a shop vacuum with a HEPA filter is a good place to start if you’re not using one right now.

-- Jonathan, Denver, CO "Constructive criticism is welcome and valued as it gives me new perspectives and helps me to advance as a woodworker."

View Dan Lyke's profile

Dan Lyke

1510 posts in 3591 days


#2 posted 01-28-2011 11:50 PM

I looked at several of the full-face positive pressure systems, and eventually settled on a set of goggles from my local paintball store. They’ve got a small battery powered fan that feeds through a foam filter that looks about as good as the Trend face shield, are much better optically than the cheap hardware store goggles, and fit fairly well.

When I wear a respirator under them it’s a little snug, but not too bad. I’m not a turner, though, and a big portion of my motivation for goggles rather than the full-on system was that I use ‘em crawling around under the house too. if I used a lathe I’d be looking at the Trend system or even the 3M system (the Triton system curves in two dimensions, which makes it harder to put a sheet of sacrificial plastic over it).

-- Dan Lyke, Petaluma California, http://www.flutterby.net/User:DanLyke

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Pimzedd

562 posts in 3270 days


#3 posted 01-29-2011 07:48 PM

Dan – Just wondering if the paintball mask meet the ANSI Z87.1 standard that all safety glasses should meet?

-- Bill - Mesquite, TX --- "Everything with a power cord eventually winds up in the trash.” John Sarge , timber framer and blacksmith instructor at Tillers International school

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Dan Lyke

1510 posts in 3591 days


#4 posted 01-30-2011 01:18 AM

Yes (and from a general feel standpoint seem quite a bit sturdier than the standard department store goggles), but that’s a great reminder that you should verify that the goggles claim Z87.1 compliance!

-- Dan Lyke, Petaluma California, http://www.flutterby.net/User:DanLyke

View Steven H's profile

Steven H

1117 posts in 2526 days


#5 posted 01-30-2011 03:44 AM

Uvex Flex Seal Goggles

They are my favorite goggles.

View FirehouseWoodworking's profile

FirehouseWoodworking

689 posts in 2740 days


#6 posted 01-30-2011 04:53 AM

I agree with Steven. I’ve had mine for quite a while and they’re great. They keep the dust out and feel very light and comfortable on my face.

Don’t pull the strap very tight, just snug, and you won’t have all the high school lab marks.

And if you LIGHTLY wipe down the outside lense from time to time with a dryer sheet, sanding dust won’t adhere to it and fuzz up your visibility. When the dust starts to adhere, just give it another wipe.

Good luck. Cheers!

-- Dave; Lansing, Kansas

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TopamaxSurvivor

17674 posts in 3142 days


#7 posted 01-30-2011 11:29 AM

Have you tried any drops in your eyes? the dust might be just enough to give you ‘dry eye”.

-- Bob in WW ~ "some old things are lovely, warm still with life ... of the forgotten men who made them." - D.H. Lawrence

View Jonathan's profile

Jonathan

2608 posts in 2517 days


#8 posted 01-30-2011 05:28 PM

Dave, great tip regarding using the dryer sheet to keep static electricity down so the dust isn’t attracted to the lens.

-- Jonathan, Denver, CO "Constructive criticism is welcome and valued as it gives me new perspectives and helps me to advance as a woodworker."

View Pimzedd's profile

Pimzedd

562 posts in 3270 days


#9 posted 01-30-2011 06:02 PM

Dan – Can you let us know what make and model you have? You got me thinking about the paintball masks. I tried to look at them but there are so many models.

Steve – Where did you get your goggles?

-- Bill - Mesquite, TX --- "Everything with a power cord eventually winds up in the trash.” John Sarge , timber framer and blacksmith instructor at Tillers International school

View Jonathan's profile

Jonathan

2608 posts in 2517 days


#10 posted 01-30-2011 06:06 PM

Do you all prefer the neoprene, or fabric headband on the Uvex goggles? I see those 2-styles of headbands on Amazon.

-- Jonathan, Denver, CO "Constructive criticism is welcome and valued as it gives me new perspectives and helps me to advance as a woodworker."

View Dan Lyke's profile

Dan Lyke

1510 posts in 3591 days


#11 posted 01-30-2011 06:35 PM

I’ll see if I can find an identifier on them. I just went in to my local paintball store and said “I need something ANSI rated that gives me powered filtered air”, described what I was doing (crawling around under the house installing fiberglass insulation… yuck) and that’s what they gave me.

-- Dan Lyke, Petaluma California, http://www.flutterby.net/User:DanLyke

View Knothead62's profile

Knothead62

2581 posts in 2427 days


#12 posted 01-30-2011 10:14 PM

Dust collection system. Your home vacuum should do the trick or a Shop Vac. If you do any amount of sanding and woodworking, go with a SV.

View NewfieDan's profile

NewfieDan

50 posts in 2115 days


#13 posted 02-28-2011 04:45 PM

There are numerous safety “goggles” available. In addition to being an electriciam I ma also a safety advosor to some of the large mega projects here in Canada.

We use something called “fectoggles” this is a generic term which is essentially a pair of convetional safety glaases the have closed cell foam arounf the frames. The foam keeps out fine dust and debris very effectively without having to wear the older style goggles you mentioned. There are numerous styles available. They can be as stylish as you wish but still provide adequate protection from the fine dust caused by sanding. You may also notice that even with these glasses you find dust getting in your eyes.

This is usually caused by taking the glasses off. There is a small lip on top of the glasses that holds dust. Most people just slip the glasses up and off the head up in an upwar and slightly backward motion. This causes the dust to fall off the lip and into the eyes. The best way to remove them is to tilt them forward and then pull them off. This will allow loose dust to fall harmelssly down in front of the glasses.

respiratory protection should also be used when sanding. Repeated exposure to the fine dust can cause a person to become sensitized to the dust. Some dust contains oils and resins naturally found in wood that can be detrimental to your health. Cedar is one of the worst as an example. Sanding is not the only cause of this dust, butt it does produce the vast majority of it.

View Jack_T's profile

Jack_T

623 posts in 2498 days


#14 posted 03-01-2011 07:32 PM

If your eyes are bothering you your lungs are probably suffering also. Start by addressing the air quality problem.

-- Jack T, John 3:16 "For God so loved the world that he gave his only Son, so that everyone who believes in him might not perish but might have eternal life."

View Viking's profile

Viking

878 posts in 2662 days


#15 posted 03-01-2011 10:47 PM

I have built a couple of down draft sanding tables and hooked them to the dust collector. This keeps almost all dust from even getting in the air. Here is link to free plans from Rockler site to build a down draft box. The DD panels are a little pricey (really work well though) but, you can actually start off using some perforated 1/4” hardboard.

http://www.rockler.com/images/Down_Draft_Ezplan.pdf

I wear safety glasses always but, do not like goggles and use them only when absolutely needed.

Good Luck!

-- Rick Gustafson - Lost Creek Ranch - Colorado County, Texas

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