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Adding abrasives to wax

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Forum topic by Thfay posted 09-20-2017 02:40 PM 548 views 0 times favorited 7 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Thfay

6 posts in 267 days


09-20-2017 02:40 PM

I want to add Tripoli powder or other fine abrasive to oil and wax to make a cutting compound to assist in sheer scraping away endgrain tear out. I commonly make a finishing wax with bees wax, walnut oil, carnauba wax, but do not know anything about adding abrasive. I would appreciate hearing about recipes and experiences.

T. H. Fay

-- BUzz, Mississippi


7 replies so far

View Nubsnstubs's profile

Nubsnstubs

1181 posts in 1512 days


#1 posted 09-20-2017 02:54 PM

Why not just get the polishing compound made for refurbishing the gleam on old worn out paint on cars? That has to be about the same grit as tripoli abrasives, plus it will give a little gloss as you polish. ............ Jerry (in Tucson)

-- Jerry (in Tucson) www.woodturnerstools.com

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LeeMills

438 posts in 1083 days


#2 posted 09-20-2017 03:46 PM


to assist in sheer scraping away endgrain tear out.

I’m not sure it will help a lot with endgrain. I usually use a wash coat of 1 pt shellac and 2 pts DNA. to harden the fibers. I have used pumice and rottenstone but that was to finish the finish years ago.
A product that gets good reviews with turners on youtube (mainly in the UK and AU) is Yorkshire Grit.
But it is not used for your purpose but to stop sanding at about 200 and then finish with the Yorkshire. But then the Yorkshire has to be completely removed with clean towels before finishing. If it is in endgrain I don’t know how you could remove it.
Here is a pic which list the ingredients.

-- We cannot solve our problems with the same thinking we used when we created them. Albert Einstein

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TheDane

5299 posts in 3445 days


#3 posted 09-20-2017 03:51 PM

Yorkshire Grit is available from the Walnut Log Studio in St. Louis … Jeff Hornung might be able to offer advice:
http://www.thewalnutlog.com/

-- Gerry -- "I don't plan to ever really grow up ... I'm just going to learn how to act in public!"

View Wildwood's profile

Wildwood

2149 posts in 1916 days


#4 posted 09-20-2017 07:36 PM

Are you dealing with scratches or genuine torn end grain (small chip outs)?
Not sure what king of project you are working on, but think using a gouge to push or pull cut away torn end grain is the ticket. Plenty of You-Tube videos on shear scraping. Following up with power sanding with appropriate sanding sequence.

Cannot see the wood surface you are talking about so don’t know if need to start out sanding with coarse, medium, fine, or very fine grit. Same procedure works for scratches.

Mixtures you are asking about are fine for finishing a film finish by rubbing out or buffing.

-- Bill

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Thfay

6 posts in 267 days


#5 posted 09-22-2017 01:41 PM

I see now that I have to show how inadequately I express my self. And I have to confess that the idea of adding abrasives to wax was given to me my an advert for Dr. KIrk’s Wax Freee.

I routinely handle shallow endgrain tear out in three ways. Less desirable and effective is resorting to 60 grit. More desirable is using mineral oil or walnut oil (my finishing oil) to soften the fibers and thirdly to use a light coating of wax to soften but still support the fibers. In the last two modes I then use a sheer scraper to put on a finer tearout free surface.

But adding abrasives to the wax interested me and I thought this would be a well known technique to wood turners.

I appreciate all the replies. I think I will just continue with what I am doing, it works.

-- BUzz, Mississippi

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Wildwood

2149 posts in 1916 days


#6 posted 09-24-2017 12:16 PM

If read all the reviews Dr. Kirks product good at removing scratches but not tool marks or torn end grain.

https://www.woodturnerscatalog.com/p/17/5652/Dr.-Kirks-Scratch-FREEE-Woodturners-Polishing-Wax\

Yes there are many products on the market that remove scratches from wood or acrylics but not torn end grain or tool marks. Like Jerry said there are a host of automotive products turners used too to remove scratches!

If have a uniform scratch pattern after sanding most film finishes will hide scratches using proper sanding sequence for that species of wood. When dealing with some exotic dense woods you need to sand to at least 3,000 to even higher to remove sanding scratches.

Turners use many different products and procedures for getting rid of torn end grain as long as it works who cares?

-- Bill

View TheDane's profile

TheDane

5299 posts in 3445 days


#7 posted 09-24-2017 03:01 PM

I have never seen a compound or wax yet that can remove end-grain tear-out (doesn’t mean there ism’t one … just means I haven’t run across it!).

The only way I know of to remove end-grain tear-out is with sharp tools and gentle shearing cuts. You can get rid of some by sanding that is a PITA.

-- Gerry -- "I don't plan to ever really grow up ... I'm just going to learn how to act in public!"

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