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Finish for ebony sushi set?

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Forum topic by JackStraw42 posted 09-20-2017 01:26 PM 431 views 0 times favorited 10 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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JackStraw42

7 posts in 519 days


09-20-2017 01:26 PM

I’m making a sushi set (chopsticks, soy sauce cups, plates, and maybe little sake cups) out of ebony for my wife. What would you recommend i finish it with? I’ve searched for food safe finishes before, but i’m not sure what would be best for ebony. I don’t want a shiny finish. Of course none of this stuff will go in the dishwasher, and will see only occasional use. I have butcher block conditioner, mineral oil, lemon oil, and other finishes on hand. I don’t think the shellac or tung oil that i have is food safe…. but i could be wrong. I’m not home to check the labels. Or, should i not use a finish at all?

Thanks for your advice!


10 replies so far

View DrDirt's profile

DrDirt

4414 posts in 3582 days


#1 posted 09-20-2017 01:30 PM

http://www.bridgecitytools.com/default/other-products/tool-care-wood-finishing-products/food-grade-chopstick-oil-15ml.html

Seems Oil is the thing.
Ad says it is mineral oil – - so same as most butcher block finishes.

-- “The two most important days in your life are the day you are born and the day you find out why.” Mark Twain

View bandit571's profile

bandit571

18641 posts in 2523 days


#2 posted 09-20-2017 02:06 PM

There is a Japanese wipe-on, wipe-off Fukiurushi Lacquer. Get the untinted version. Wear gloves when applying it.

-- A Planer? I'M the planer, this is what I use

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Rich

1986 posts in 429 days


#3 posted 09-20-2017 03:05 PM

I use Mahoney’s Walnut Oil on my chopsticks.

-- No matter how much you push the envelope, it'll still be stationery.

View OSU55's profile

OSU55

1426 posts in 1829 days


#4 posted 09-20-2017 04:09 PM

Shellac is food safe, but the sake would soften and probably remove it. Plain ole mineral oil is probably the best bet. Wipe some on each time the set is used, after initial soak.

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JackStraw42

7 posts in 519 days


#5 posted 09-21-2017 01:41 PM

Thanks for the advice guys, much appreciated!

View builtinbkyn's profile

builtinbkyn

1924 posts in 780 days


#6 posted 09-21-2017 02:09 PM

You can put a good polish on ebony prior to finishing by burnishing it with a felt disk on a Dremel or a polishing wheel on a grinder. Then just wax them for protection using bees wax. I think the mineral oil will eventually evaporate leaving them unprotected.

-- Bill, Yo!......in Brooklyn & Steel City :)

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OSU55

1426 posts in 1829 days


#7 posted 09-21-2017 04:03 PM

+1 on polishing the ebony. The bare wood can be bought to a fairly high sheen if needed. Mineral oil will keep it from drying out over the years, wax will not.

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builtinbkyn

1924 posts in 780 days


#8 posted 09-21-2017 08:46 PM



+1 on polishing the ebony. The bare wood can be bought to a fairly high sheen if needed. Mineral oil will keep it from drying out over the years, wax will not.

- OSU55


Mineral oil won’t evaporate like other oils?

-- Bill, Yo!......in Brooklyn & Steel City :)

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OSU55

1426 posts in 1829 days


#9 posted 09-23-2017 11:58 AM

Yes it will but it takes a while. As mentioned the set should be re oiled after use. The solvents in the wax evaporate in minutes and the wax does nothing to prevent natural oils from drying out. Something a bit more permanent, and food safe after curing is poly (dilute to wiping varnish 1:1). Do 3-4 applications, keep wet for 5-30minutes, wipe off. This would need repeated annually or so depending on use.

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builtinbkyn

1924 posts in 780 days


#10 posted 09-23-2017 06:14 PM



Yes it will but it takes a while. As mentioned the set should be re oiled after use. The solvents in the wax evaporate in minutes and the wax does nothing to prevent natural oils from drying out. Something a bit more permanent, and food safe after curing is poly (dilute to wiping varnish 1:1). Do 3-4 applications, keep wet for 5-30minutes, wipe off. This would need repeated annually or so depending on use.

- OSU55


Natural bees wax doesn’t have any solvents added. I also don’t believe ebony has much in the way of natural oils to dry out.

But what I’ve found in some reading is, natural lacquers are traditionally used on those glossy chop sticks. They’re dipped several times and allowed to dry between dips.

-- Bill, Yo!......in Brooklyn & Steel City :)

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