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Dewalt 735 vs Northern Tool 15" planer

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Forum topic by Campeasy posted 09-19-2017 07:17 PM 572 views 0 times favorited 18 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Campeasy

22 posts in 110 days


09-19-2017 07:17 PM

Topic tags/keywords: question resource tip jointer plane planer dewalt 735 northern tool

I have searched the forum on this site and read everything Google has to offer on this subject. All information is older. Which matters because i know the dewalt had some issues when it first came out. I have an opportunity to purchase either a dewalt 735 for $500 (4 hours away) or a Northern Tool 15 for $450 + 2 extra sets of blades (30 min away). I’m definitely leaning towards the 15”. The only draw back i can see is the minimum cut height of the NT is ⅜”. While the dewalt can shave pieces at ⅛“. Aside from this its also much heavier (460lbs vs 80lbs) The machine will be stationary. I have a 220 20 amp outlet. Can anyone give me a reason not to go with the bigger machine?


18 replies so far

View CharlesA's profile

CharlesA

3286 posts in 1579 days


#1 posted 09-19-2017 07:26 PM

I have no expertise to offer. I did find Chris Schwarz’s argument unexpected:

https://www.popularwoodworking.com/articleindex/why-portable-planers-are-better

-- "Man is the only animal which devours his own, for I can apply no milder term to the general prey of the rich on the poor." ~Thomas Jefferson

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Loren

9428 posts in 3430 days


#2 posted 09-19-2017 07:48 PM

Portable planers underperform stationary
planers in consistency of thicknessing
in my experience. If you make face frames
or door frames the inconsistencies will have
you spending more time sanding corners.

That said, portable planers do tend to yield
a nicer finish.

View bigblockyeti's profile

bigblockyeti

4552 posts in 1502 days


#3 posted 09-19-2017 07:55 PM

Dewalt is top of the line in portable planers, but even the best have limitations. I’ll assume the dewalt is used since it’s 4 hours away. I would call it close if the dewalt were brand new but still opt for the 15” NT, used it’s an easy decision. I have the dewalt DW734 and it’s great for what it is but working it hard just feels like it’s going to break. For that reason I just picked up a 24” Rockwell that needs to be wired up and put to work. The additional width and induction motor of the NT are worth a lot in the long run.

View Redoak49's profile

Redoak49

2793 posts in 1770 days


#4 posted 09-19-2017 08:00 PM

It is not a question of which planer but more a question of what you want it to do. I have a 735 and a Jet 15” planer.

I use the 735 more. It is easier to fine tune the thickness and does not have the serrated infeed rolls that the 15” has. If I have a lot of wood to hog down, the 15” is the one. If I have a smaller job, the 735, is my go to machine. Changing Blades is also easier on the 735.

View Fred Hargis's profile

Fred Hargis

4642 posts in 2275 days


#5 posted 09-19-2017 08:01 PM

I think you can work around that minimum cut, I do with my Delta. I put a piece of melamine through it as a bed, and I can plane down to about 3/16”.....but I don’t like to do it. Wood that thin has a tendency to lift up into the cutters and get shredded (exactly that word). So about the lowest I go is 1/4”, anything thinner than that needs to go through a drum sander. So…NO, there is no reason to not go with the stationary machine, assuming it is in operable condition. To build a little on what Loren said about the nicer finish….the benchtop planers have rollers that are covered in a rubbery type compound that grip the board by friction. The stationary ones have feed rollers that are serrated steel, and they leave tracks if you don’t cut deep enough to remove them. So they won’t do a skim cut nearly as well as a benchtop.

-- Our village hasn't lost it's idiot, he was elected to congress.

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Campeasy

22 posts in 110 days


#6 posted 09-19-2017 10:55 PM

Thank you all for your input. Perhaps i should have mentioned that i currently own the 734. I only work with hardwood and i plane for, on average, one hour a day. I turn out one or two end grain cutting boards or chess boards a week. I also build sofa tables, coffee tables, end tables, etc..all that being said, I am on the way to (most likely) purchase the Northern. In order to do so i am returning my dewalt. Woodworking is a hobby, one that I love and one that pays for itself. But also a hobby that can only afford one planer. I’ll update shortly

View bigblockyeti's profile

bigblockyeti

4552 posts in 1502 days


#7 posted 09-20-2017 12:00 AM

An hour a day for a universal motor could represent a good portion of the motor’s overall life in as little as a year. I probably average a couple hours a week at most. If you can still return the dewalt, I would recommend doing so. Keeping both would be like having a 1/2 ton and a 3/4 ton truck in the driveway both to do nearly the same job.

View CharlesA's profile

CharlesA

3286 posts in 1579 days


#8 posted 09-20-2017 12:06 AM

I was thinking Dewalt until that hour a day. That’s a ton of planing.

-- "Man is the only animal which devours his own, for I can apply no milder term to the general prey of the rich on the poor." ~Thomas Jefferson

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Campeasy

22 posts in 110 days


#9 posted 09-20-2017 02:45 AM

Returned the dewalt. Returned with this beast. The guy i bought it from purchased it 4 years ago from some company that never even set it up. Runs great, extremely low hours, very well maintained. New blades and an extra set of blades.

View Fred Hargis's profile

Fred Hargis

4642 posts in 2275 days


#10 posted 09-20-2017 10:54 AM

If you didn’t get the manual, one piece of advice you need is to only shift gears on that thing when the motor is running. I looked at one for a friend once, and it only had one speed…the owner speculated it had been shifted while stopped and then started up.

-- Our village hasn't lost it's idiot, he was elected to congress.

View Carloz's profile

Carloz

764 posts in 373 days


#11 posted 09-20-2017 11:25 AM



Thank you all for your input. Perhaps i should have mentioned that i currently own the 734. I only work with hardwood and i plane for, on average, one hour a day. I turn out one or two end grain cutting boards or chess boards a week. I also build sofa tables, coffee tables, end tables, etc..all that being said, I am on the way to (most likely) purchase the Northern. In order to do so i am returning my dewalt. Woodworking is a hobby, one that I love and one that pays for itself. But also a hobby that can only afford one planer. I ll update shortly

- Campeasy


I like America! You can buy something, then return it on a whim and let the merchant eat the cost!
Once I saw an apparently homeless man successfullly returned an empty vodka bottle claiming that all vodka leaked out ! True story.

View bigblockyeti's profile

bigblockyeti

4552 posts in 1502 days


#12 posted 09-20-2017 03:40 PM

I like America! You can buy something, then return it on a whim and let the merchant eat the cost!
Once I saw an apparently homeless man successfullly returned an empty vodka bottle claiming that all vodka leaked out ! True story.

- Carloz


Which one, north or south? Not all of the countries within the two continents that make up America enjoy this liberty. Returning something that doesn’t fit your needs within a specified time period is neither illegal or immoral. Falsely claiming a bottle leaked it’s contents if it in fact did not is illegal.

View ArtMann's profile

ArtMann

629 posts in 598 days


#13 posted 09-20-2017 03:54 PM

I don’t mean to be argumentative but I machine wood to consistencies of +/- 0.005” over the entire surface all the time. Face frame requirements are nowhere close to that. The accuracy is required for CNC router engraving where depth of cut accuracy is 100% dependent on the consistency of the wood thickness. For over 10 years, I used a Ridgid TP1300 lunchbox planer. It was equipped with a Wixey DRO and I was able to routinely set the necessary accuracy every time without any trial cuts. I now use a new Jet JJP12-HH 12 inch cast iron jointer/planer. I fitted it with a DRO as well but I just can’t get the accuracy I got with the Ridgid. I have experienced the same kind of problem with every 15 or 20 inch cast iron planer I have ever used – and there have been several. Since getting the new machine, I always plane a little thick and run the material through the drum sander to finalize the thickness of the material.

I realize that the TP1300 isn’t the same as the Dewalt 735 but I can’t bring myself to believe its accuracy would be worse.


Portable planers underperform stationary
planers in consistency of thicknessing
in my experience. If you make face frames
or door frames the inconsistencies will have
you spending more time sanding corners.

That said, portable planers do tend to yield
a nicer finish.

- Loren


View Redoak49's profile

Redoak49

2793 posts in 1770 days


#14 posted 09-20-2017 07:05 PM

I have an issue with the comment concerning the consistency of thickness for portable planers.

I have a DW735 and just used it to make face frames and panel frames from Red oak for a dresser. After planing, all of the wood was the same thickness within 0.005”. When assembled the frames did not need any sanding at the joints.

View Campeasy's profile

Campeasy

22 posts in 110 days


#15 posted 09-21-2017 12:24 AM

I like America! You can buy something, then return it on a whim and let the merchant eat the cost!
Once I saw an apparently homeless man successfullly returned an empty vodka bottle claiming that all vodka leaked out ! True story.

Ok, so. First of all, it wasn’t “on a whim”. I purchased the dewalt because i couldn’t find a larger machine in my price range. I figured, why not give it a try? But I’ve been keeping an eye on clist for something more durable. I returned the dewalt because i was concerned about the possibility of total catastrophic failure after a year or two and total loss of my investment. Is that a legitimate reason to return a $500 machine? Second, the merchant doesn’t “eat the cost”. The machine is returned to the manufacturer who then refurbishes it themselves or sells it (for a profit) to a third party company like Big Sky. Seems like everyone goes home happy.

Fred, thank you, ive been looking online for a manual but can only find one for the 15” jet, they’re close enough, ive been told. Would you say so as well?

Pertaining to bench top vs cast
In my admittedly limited experience with the dewalt, and woodwork in general, but having used the dewalt quite a bit recently i will say this. If i could afford both and had room for both, that would be the way to go. The dewalt is a fantastic machine, much better than the Porter cable 12”. Its accurate, delivers a very smooth finish, and will plane material as thin as ⅛” thick. However, I begin with a lot of rough hewn lumber, what the dewalt takes 6 passes to accomplish, the NT does in one.

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