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Makita 2030 drive chain size

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Forum topic by Guswah posted 09-19-2017 06:39 PM 334 views 0 times favorited 11 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Guswah

20 posts in 307 days


09-19-2017 06:39 PM

I’m nearing the finish line in the restoration of my old 2030. I think I’ve correctly installed the sprockets and the chain, but that chain really appears to be sagging. I noticed in base of the cover panel there was evidence of prior chain-dragging and a lot of grease build-up, so obviously this existed in its last years of use. I acquired this machine in pieces, but here’s the chain as I’ve now installed it:

I’m wondering if I should remove a link from the chain. That would definitely tighten it up, but maybe the chain is not meant to run snugly? It would be helpful if someone else posted a photo of theirs. Or can someone with a 2030 tell me how many links they have?

This site has been very helpful, and I appreciate it very much!

-- A woodworker's skill is usually proportional to the number of clamps he possesses.


11 replies so far

View MrUnix's profile

MrUnix

6012 posts in 2038 days


#1 posted 09-19-2017 07:07 PM

Should tighten up once you get it running… the tensioner is there for that reason. Spin the right feed roller counterclockwise (or just push down on the tensioner) and you will see it snug up. Anyway, here are pictures of the drivetrains from my two machines:

The first picture has a spring that I got from ereplacementparts.com (the machine was missing the entire tensioning assembly), and the second picture is a factory original spring. It does sag a bit on the bottom, but should not cause any problems.

I’ll leave it up to you to count the links if you want :)

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - In Dog I trust... everything else is questionable

View Guswah's profile

Guswah

20 posts in 307 days


#2 posted 09-19-2017 10:54 PM

Well, even if I manually shove the tensioner to its most-tensioned position, there is still a significant sag. Which leads me to wonder if, over years of use, the chain has stretched a bit. I know that this occurs with chainsaws all the time.

-- A woodworker's skill is usually proportional to the number of clamps he possesses.

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MrUnix

6012 posts in 2038 days


#3 posted 09-19-2017 11:42 PM

Make sure your feed rollers are spinning freely… pushing on the tensioner should turn the roller and the bottom portion between the two will tighten up. You can also just push/pull the chain above the feed roller (ie: ignore the tensioner). Does the same thing under load when running. You don’t have an issue as far as I can see unless the rollers are sticking in the plain bearings.

Cheers,
Brad

PS: What do you mean “its most tensioned position”? Is it stopping somewhere? It shouldn’t.

-- Brad in FL - In Dog I trust... everything else is questionable

View bigblockyeti's profile

bigblockyeti

4698 posts in 1560 days


#4 posted 09-19-2017 11:49 PM

As chains wear, so do sprockets to match the increased roller to roller distance. If you replace one without replacing the other it will cause significantly accelerated wear.

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runswithscissors

2565 posts in 1864 days


#5 posted 09-19-2017 11:57 PM

I had to replace the drive chain on an old 13” Rockwell/Invicta planer, but the local hardware store didn’t have anything that would work. Which meant it had to be metric (the Invicta factory is or was in Brazil). Having the Grizzly HQ nearby, I took a sprocket into them, and their sales clerk kindly pulled off the chain cover on one of their planers, and it fit perfectly. Of course they sold me a length of chain.

-- I admit to being an adrenaline junky; fortunately, I'm very easily frightened

View Guswah's profile

Guswah

20 posts in 307 days


#6 posted 09-20-2017 04:37 AM

MrUnix, I think I get your point. If I push the tensioner to the left, the sag disappears. But if I release my finger and allow the spring to be at complete rest, the sag appears as shown. I gather, therefore, that when the machine is working and there is nobody there to help, the spring will not keep the chain from rubbing the bottom because it does not pull hard enough to correct this. And BTW, the length of my spring doesn’t look any different from either of yours.

On another point, I hope that my top sprocket behaves correctly by not moving when the motor is off. Does that seem about right? Because unlike the roller sprockets, the top, drive sprocket is completely unyielding. I haven’t turned the machine on yet to test this.

-- A woodworker's skill is usually proportional to the number of clamps he possesses.

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MrUnix

6012 posts in 2038 days


#7 posted 09-20-2017 04:56 AM

The top sprocket is the drive gear – it’s shafted to the cutterhead and gearbox behind it at a really low ratio… think about it, the cutter head is spinning at several thousand rpm, while the feed rollers are turning very slowly. You cannot turn that gear by hand, even if you tried really, really hard.

As for the chain tension… the drive gear will pull one feed roller, which in turn will remove any slack when it pulls on the other roller. The tensioner is there to take up the slack when that happens. The only time you should get any slack between the two rollers is when the machine is not running. You are fine. Run the machine with the cover off and you will see how it works.

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - In Dog I trust... everything else is questionable

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Guswah

20 posts in 307 days


#8 posted 09-20-2017 02:31 PM

Actually I showed my machine the photos of your machines. My machine was so embarrassed that I was forced to clean off all the grease with Q-Tips.

-- A woodworker's skill is usually proportional to the number of clamps he possesses.

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MrUnix

6012 posts in 2038 days


#9 posted 09-20-2017 05:04 PM

Actually I showed my machine the photos of your machines. My machine was so embarrassed that I was forced to clean off all the grease with Q-Tips.
- Guswah

LOL – the blue one took quite a bit of work to get it that way :) I was able to pretty much get it back to like new except for the two main posts, which were really bad off when I bought it. The bellows had rotted away and left them exposed, so they were really badly rusted/pitted. I cleaned them up, but the pitting is still very visable… some new bellows would hide them nicely. The table still rides on them just fine, but they are butt ugly compared to the rest of the machine:

The other machine was in almost pristine condition when I purchased it, and didn’t need anything but a good waxing on the table tops.

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - In Dog I trust... everything else is questionable

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Guswah

20 posts in 307 days


#10 posted 09-20-2017 06:12 PM

Yeah, those are some pitted posts! They make mine look pretty good in hindsight. You did say when you started the project that it took you a long time to unstick them from the carriage. Ditto for mine. I just sanded and sanded (and sanded) mine until they were finally smooth, but in my westcoast climate, I’ll need to be very vigilant and keep them moist with WD40. BTW, I see that replacement posts are still available, although you could probably get the identical thing cheaper at any pipe supplier who just cuts them to length from stock.

-- A woodworker's skill is usually proportional to the number of clamps he possesses.

View RookieWood's profile

RookieWood

22 posts in 690 days


#11 posted 10-23-2017 08:38 PM

Guswah / MrUnix, As you see I don’t post much but learn a lot from reading all the posts. If I read this correctly you said you ” (the machine was missing the entire tensioning assembly), ” Where did you get one. I have been searching for a while and it is the only part I need. I am getting ready to try and manufacture one. Any help from anyone would be greatly appreciated.

Brad M.

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