LumberJocks

Worksharp 3000 basic Q

  • Advertise with us

« back to Power Tools, Hardware and Accessories forum

Forum topic by unclearthur posted 09-19-2017 06:06 AM 445 views 0 times favorited 10 replies Add to Favorites Watch
View unclearthur's profile

unclearthur

113 posts in 1566 days


09-19-2017 06:06 AM

Just got a Workshop 3000, a couple of questions for those familiar with it:

Assume sharpening a plane blade at 25 degrees, with a microbevel at 30 degrees, and just using the stock papers (120 / 400 / 1000 / 3600). No other papers or stones.

Q1. Do you flatten the back through all the grits of just to 400 or 1,000? (Not worried about mirror finish, just from practical point of view).

Q2. If you are adding a microbevel, is there a reason to use the highest grits on the main 25 degree bevel? The cutting edge will come from the microbevel won’t it?

Q3. When just touching up the blade from time to time (using the same primary bevel) do you only sharpen at the microbevel angle? With which grits?

Thanks for any replies.


10 replies so far

View robscastle's profile

robscastle

4285 posts in 1983 days


#1 posted 09-19-2017 07:48 AM

View HokieKen's profile (online now)

HokieKen

4286 posts in 917 days


#2 posted 09-19-2017 11:43 AM

I have the WS3000 and love it. In fact, I have stopped using microbevels since I got it. It’s so fast and easy just to hone the whole bevel that I don’t really think it saves any time or makes sharpening any easier. I flatten the backs of my irons up through whatever my highest grit is for sharpening. For me, 600 is plenty fine enough for my plane irons. Really, 440 is probably good but I carry on through 600 anyway. For touch-ups, I just use the 600 grit.

Now, that’s with no microbevel. If I had a microbevel, I suppose I may go up to 1000 grit since it would be so quick. It’s really just a matter of how polished you think your edge needs to be. My basic theory is that for a consistent edge, both the bevel and the back need to be honed to the same grit. No more, no less. When touching up, I see no reason you would touch the primary bevel. Just the microbevel and just at the highest grit.

When I sharpen, I tend to use the wide blade attachment just because I like to be able to feel the edge while I’m grinding to make sure I don’t overheat it. But, I use the “port” underneath a lot too for chisels and find that it works well.

Hope that helps.

-- Kenny, SW VA, Go Hokies!!!

View Handtooler's profile

Handtooler

1473 posts in 1910 days


#3 posted 09-19-2017 12:20 PM

For touch-up why not use a strop for 20 strokes or so?

-- Russell Pitner Hixson, TN 37343 bassboy40@outlook.com

View HokieKen's profile (online now)

HokieKen

4286 posts in 917 days


#4 posted 09-19-2017 12:25 PM



For touch-up why not use a strop for 20 strokes or so?

- Handtooler

Forgot to address that and I meant to… thanks Russell :-)

Concerning stropping on the WS3000: I use a leather strop with green compound to finish off all my sharpened edges on irons and chisels. I have the strop for the WS but I HATE it. I could never get it to work well. It tears easily and because of the thickness of the leather, the angles are slightly different. I recommend stropping for final touches or for quick touch-ups as Russell suggests. BUT I recommend having a separate strop and not using the WS leather wheel. It’s too easy to dub a good edge on the machine.

-- Kenny, SW VA, Go Hokies!!!

View Fred Hargis's profile

Fred Hargis

4640 posts in 2272 days


#5 posted 09-19-2017 12:55 PM

What Kenny said is true about the strop, especially the different angles. the way I use mine is to hold the blade in my hand and just touch it up…seems to work really well. I also don’t use micro bevels….the WS has really made that unneeded.

-- Our village hasn't lost it's idiot, he was elected to congress.

View HokieKen's profile (online now)

HokieKen

4286 posts in 917 days


#6 posted 09-19-2017 02:05 PM

FWIW, when I first got my WS, I started a blog comparing using it to using my diamond plates for various tasks. I haven’t updated it in a while but there MAY be something helpful in there if the WS is new to you. Blog is here

-- Kenny, SW VA, Go Hokies!!!

View Mainiac Matt 's profile

Mainiac Matt

7285 posts in 2107 days


#7 posted 09-19-2017 02:17 PM

I recommend having a separate strop and not using the WS leather wheel. It s too easy to dub a good edge on the machine.
- HokieKen

FWIW, I made a couple wheels from 1/2” MDF that I use for stropping. I smear the compound on while the wheel is turning, and it generated enough heat to soften it up and smear it around. Then I work both sides of the chisel, knowing that It won’t change the angle or blunt the edges.

-- Pine is fine, but Oak's no joke!

View unclearthur's profile

unclearthur

113 posts in 1566 days


#8 posted 09-20-2017 07:57 AM


FWIW, when I first got my WS, I started a blog comparing using it to using my diamond plates for various tasks. I haven t updated it in a while but there MAY be something helpful in there if the WS is new to you. Blog is here

- HokieKen

Thanks …. interesting read. What is the “paper” test and “ballpoint pen” test for sharpness? I want to see if I am passing.

View HokieKen's profile (online now)

HokieKen

4286 posts in 917 days


#9 posted 09-20-2017 12:31 PM

Paper test is slicing a sheet of paper that’s held loosely in the air and getting clean cuts.

Ball point pen test is sliding the bevel down a pen (like a sharpie) and gradually increasing the angle until the cutting edge “catches”. A sharp edge will grab and dig in immediately. If the edge “skitters” a couple of times before digging in, it’s not sharp enough.

-- Kenny, SW VA, Go Hokies!!!

View WoodES's profile

WoodES

83 posts in 1469 days


#10 posted 09-21-2017 04:47 AM

Another vote against microbevel. Took a sharpening class from Wooddcraft a couple of years ago and the instructor thought the microbevel was a waste of time. After sharpening my tools without MB, I agree.

I use my worksharp, through the 1200 grits then use the worksharp hone for the final. Sharp when I can shave the hair on my arm….

Have your say...

You must be signed in to reply.

DISCLAIMER: Any posts on LJ are posted by individuals acting in their own right and do not necessarily reflect the views of LJ. LJ will not be held liable for the actions of any user.

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

HomeRefurbers.com