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Dayton high-pressure blower - okay for a dust collection system?

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Forum topic by skeezaroonie posted 01-28-2011 09:29 AM 6299 views 0 times favorited 10 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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skeezaroonie

23 posts in 2157 days


01-28-2011 09:29 AM

Sometime back I acquired a Dayton 4C108 blower with a 1 horse Dayton motor. The blower is described as a “high pressure” blower. I’ve used it from time to time to help move some of the wonderful Texas heat around but am now thinnin’ about the possibility of adapting it as a dust collector blower/motor. Anyone have any thoughts about its suitability for this?

Here is a link to the same blower for sale on drillspot: Daytyon 4C108 blower

It’s got a 10 5/8” dia. radial fan, with a 6” inlet and a square 4” X 3.5” outlet that an adapter could round off.

I wonder about that “high pressure” statement – I can testify that this sucker (well, it is, isn’t it? ;-) sure does move air big-time but I’ve got no data on the actual cfm or static pressure it can generate. But it sure seems like it oughta make one cracker-jack dust collector.

Any thoughts about this would be appreciated.

-- Most men pursue pleasure with such breathless haste that they hurry past it. -Soren Kierkegaard


10 replies so far

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sawblade1

754 posts in 2491 days


#1 posted 01-28-2011 10:06 AM

Taken from the link you provided (last paragraph) reads

  • WARNING: Not intended for use where flammable or explosive gases, vapors, or dust are present. (#) Motor overload will result if blower is operated at static pressure below performance shown.

High Pressure Direct Drive Radial Blade Blower, Wheel Diameter 10 5/8 Inches, Wheel Bore 5/8 Inch, Inlet Diameter 6 Inches, Outlet Height 4 Inches, Outlet Width 3 1/2 Inches, Mounting Hole Diameter 3/8 Inch, Maximum Inlet Air Temperature 180 Degrees F, CW Rotation Viewed From Drive Side, Without Motor, Recommended Motor Power Rating 1 HP Or 1 1/2 HP @ 3450 RPM

So no is your answer :(

Sorry, but I would rather be safe than sorry

-- Proverbs Ch:3 vs 5,6,7 Trust in the lord with all thine heart and lean not unto your own understanding but in all your ways aknowledge him and he shall direct your path elmerthomas81@neo.rr.com

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TopamaxSurvivor

17671 posts in 3140 days


#2 posted 01-28-2011 10:40 AM

I was just about to paste that warning. Wood dust is consideered a hazardous material. If the motor was not an issue, dust collestors are just blowers with an appripriate motor.

-- Bob in WW ~ "some old things are lovely, warm still with life ... of the forgotten men who made them." - D.H. Lawrence

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Loren

8306 posts in 3112 days


#3 posted 01-28-2011 11:50 AM

I don’t recall exactly, but sometime in the past I read something
about steel or iron blower fans being no good for dust impellers
due to the spark factor. For dust collectors then plastic, brass,
copper, and bronze make sense. I never inspected a dust collector
blower to figure out what the impeller was made of though.

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TopamaxSurvivor

17671 posts in 3140 days


#4 posted 01-28-2011 12:06 PM

I believe the dust blowers in WW plants I worked on 30 years ago were steel fans. I can’t imagine how it would start a fire spinning in free air moving dust. Wood certainly would not be any more explosive than grain dust, probably less. All the grain handling equipment we had was steel.

-- Bob in WW ~ "some old things are lovely, warm still with life ... of the forgotten men who made them." - D.H. Lawrence

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TheWoodNerd

288 posts in 2656 days


#5 posted 01-28-2011 01:08 PM

I think the issue is sucking up a nail or screw that strikes the impeller. Every explosion-proof fan I’ve see has aluminum fan blades because of this. Also, the theory is that (unless you have a cyclone or other pre-separator) you can send a hot bit of metal into the dust pile. Although I don’t know how realistic that is.

-- The Wood Nerd -- http://www.workshopaholic.net

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TopamaxSurvivor

17671 posts in 3140 days


#6 posted 01-28-2011 06:44 PM

Good point, they may have been Al. I have worked in a lot of explosion proof installations, but never looked close at the compostiton of the fans to determine the metal.

-- Bob in WW ~ "some old things are lovely, warm still with life ... of the forgotten men who made them." - D.H. Lawrence

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skeezaroonie

23 posts in 2157 days


#7 posted 01-28-2011 09:14 PM

Some interesting food for thought here, thanks for the help everyone. I always thought the issue with fire & explosion possibility with wood dust and dust collection was static, not sparks. And the impeller of the Dayton fan is aluminum, not steel, which is what a many, or most, of the fans for dust collectors are made of as well. There are also steel impellers in use, as well (Bill Pentz recommends steel). There is an issue with strikes by metallic objects and other foreign objects but that is, as near as I can tell, no different from other collector fans. Shoot, I worry about sucking up screws and nails into my Delta 50-760 single stage which I am going to convert into a two stage soon.

I am thinking about this with a small cyclone or at least one of the garbage can cyclone tops which should take away many of the FOD problems, and using standard anti-static procedures (grounded copper) against static build-up, and venting directly to the outside.

It’s more the design of the fan that wonder about, and the “high-pressure” designation – is that somehow different in operation from a commercial dust collector fan. It’s hard to see a difference. Interesting discussion, I’m for sure gonna spend some time mulling this over before I do anything. But with essentially nothing invested in the motor and blower I could sure make one el cheapo dust collector.

-- Most men pursue pleasure with such breathless haste that they hurry past it. -Soren Kierkegaard

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TopamaxSurvivor

17671 posts in 3140 days


#8 posted 01-29-2011 04:54 AM

The most common way of ealing with hazardous atmospheres is to use non-listed equipment that is placed beyond the boundary or behid a suitable barrier. If the motor is not in a sealed air flow and mounted out of the shop, you might be OK. There are a lot of issues concerning these classifications.

This reminds me of a general purpose rain tight panel I was sent to install at a fuel farm that had truck loading and barge unloading facilities. To add to the excitement, there were a couple of gas pumps to boot. The panel had hazardous atmosheres below and on all sides, but it was legal. ;-))

-- Bob in WW ~ "some old things are lovely, warm still with life ... of the forgotten men who made them." - D.H. Lawrence

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skeezaroonie

23 posts in 2157 days


#9 posted 01-29-2011 05:08 AM

TopamaxSurvivor: This reminds me of a general purpose rain tight panel I was sent to install at a fuel farm that had truck loading and barge unloading facilities. To add to the excitement, there were a couple of gas pumps to boot. The panel had hazardous atmosheres below and on all sides, but it was legal. ;-))

And I betcha there was a little pucker moment when you first energized that panel, too! LOL

-- Most men pursue pleasure with such breathless haste that they hurry past it. -Soren Kierkegaard

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TopamaxSurvivor

17671 posts in 3140 days


#10 posted 01-29-2011 08:19 AM

Not really, it was out in the open atmosphere. There are very few days in the NW where fumes will concentrate to a point where they will ignite. Trust me:-)) Back in the good ol’ days, they couldn’t stop puming gas, so we were expected to wire gas pumps hot when they updated or changed out a damaged one.

Sometimes the pumps fittings would leak a little. It was common to find enough a little sign of that under the pumps, but in a saturation that would support a flame. One day I was wiring one that had a little more than normal under it. A wire go loose and sparked when it brushed against the pump internal workings. A small flame started, so I slapped it with my hand. It didn’t go out, so I grabbed a hand full of dirt from off to the side of the hole under the pump to throw on the fire. It flamed up a bit. There was an old man filling his pickup within 3 feet of me. He ws watching the proceedings.

When I couldn’t get the fire out, I went to the station operator and asked for his. Mine was not in the truck that day as we had all left them at the shop for their annual check up ;-)) Murphy’s law!! The operator asked who was going to pay for the refill? I told him I was sure my boss would. He started to argue with me about it. I told him to give me the GD fire extinguisher or I was getting the H out of there!! He could deal with the fire s he saw fit. He handed me the fire extinguisher. I put the fire out. The old man hadn’t finished filling his truck yet. He was still pumping gas within 3 feet of the fire ;-))

-- Bob in WW ~ "some old things are lovely, warm still with life ... of the forgotten men who made them." - D.H. Lawrence

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