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Maple door jambs?

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Forum topic by William Shelley posted 09-18-2017 10:47 PM 315 views 0 times favorited 10 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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William Shelley

439 posts in 1250 days


09-18-2017 10:47 PM

I’m doing some remodeling work and picked up a beautiful commercial solid core maple door at a secondhand store for dirt cheap ($35 for 36×84 x 1-3/4”, with frosted glass single lite). I would like to make a jamb that matches and I’m not sure what the best way to construct this is. This is an interior door.

I could start with 6/4” stock and straighten / flatten to a solid jamb with a rabbet to accept the door, or i could start with 4/4 or 3/4 stock and make a flat jamb with a separate stop. The one-piece approach seems quicker but uses more material.

I’ve noticed that the commercially produced jambs tend to have some sort of finger-jointed build-up with a thick veneer of the desired wood over the surface, and I’m sure this saves money when they’re building thousands of feet a week (or day) of this stock, but unless i’m much mistaken, I’ll end up wasting a lot of time doing this vs just making it solid.

It’s likely that the only surface treatment will be a polyurethane finish over the jamb, leaving the natural wood color.

-- Woodworking from an engineer's perspective


10 replies so far

View firefighterontheside's profile

firefighterontheside

16447 posts in 1637 days


#1 posted 09-18-2017 11:00 PM

I think I would use 3/4” maple stock to make the jamb and then apply a maple stop. This will be faster and if there is any bow to the door, the stop can follow the bow.

-- Bill M. "People change, walnut doesn't" by Gene.

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cabmaker

1598 posts in 2589 days


#2 posted 09-19-2017 12:00 AM

If it is to be used as an exterior door you want to start with 6/4 and rebate for the door

Leave it full (say one inch) to better accommodate the hinge screws (except for the rebate of coarse)

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William Shelley

439 posts in 1250 days


#3 posted 09-19-2017 01:48 AM



If it is to be used as an exterior door you want to start with 6/4 and rebate for the door

Leave it full (say one inch) to better accommodate the hinge screws (except for the rebate of coarse)

- cabmaker

It’s an interior door. Does the thickness of the jamb matter that much for screw holding strength? I was under the impression that for solid core or otherwise “heavy” doors, it was better to use hinge screws that went through the jamb and into the studs.

I’d estimate that the door I’m going to use weighs between 90 and 110lbs, it takes two people to move it.

-- Woodworking from an engineer's perspective

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firefighterontheside

16447 posts in 1637 days


#4 posted 09-19-2017 02:34 AM

I would put at at least one long screw from each hinge into the framing.

-- Bill M. "People change, walnut doesn't" by Gene.

View Rich's profile

Rich

1700 posts in 370 days


#5 posted 09-19-2017 04:04 AM

Generally, 1-3/4” is an entry door, not interior. 1-3/8 is the standard thickness for interior doors. Listen to FIreFighter and use long screws to hang it so you get into the framing. My garage entry door weighed about 80 lbs, and I used the long screws on all four holes of the top two hinges.

I’m confused about your mention of 6/4 stock, since that’s going to be less than 1-1/2 when it’s milled. I’d go wth 4/4, and slice it two inches wide and mill from there.

-- No matter how much you push the envelope, it'll still be stationery.

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Loren

9422 posts in 3428 days


#6 posted 09-19-2017 04:22 AM

I don’t want to invalidate other comments,
but in the cause of economy I think I would
go with 4/4 stock and run it through the planer.
At 3/4” thick I think it will be straight enough
when nailed to the framing with shims to
back-up the high spots. This is different from
furniture making where spans of wood are
unsupported and have to be straight in and
of themselves for the piece to look right.

I would of course try to select straight stock
when skipping the jointer. I’m not saying
the jointer need be skipped entirely but that
milling one face of a 80” board dead flat
would be overkill considering the flexibility
of the material at 3/4” thick.

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William Shelley

439 posts in 1250 days


#7 posted 09-19-2017 04:52 AM

I realize that 1-3/4” doors are typically exterior in the context of residential construction. That’s why I specified that I bought a commercial door at a secondhand store, a building material refurbishing / reselling place that operates on donations.

In it’s former life, this door was likely in an office building. It came with a spring or hydraulic assist door closer at the top, and a stainless steel kickplate at the bottom. Not your typical household fare, but it will fit my decor.

Rich – I’m making the jamb, not the door itself.

I would need 6/4 or 5/4 stock to make a full-thickness single-rabbet profile. But as Loren pointed out, a 3/4” jamb would be flexible enough to get installed straight even if there was a slight bow. A 1-1/8” (single rabbet) finished thickness board would be a lot stiffer.

“Single rabbet” refers to a solid profile like this:

And a “solid double rabbet” refers to a profile like this, made from one board:

Whereas a “stopped, two-piece” profile looks like this:

-- Woodworking from an engineer's perspective

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William Shelley

439 posts in 1250 days


#8 posted 09-19-2017 05:00 AM

Anyway, thanks. Loren’s comments regarding economy I believe are correct. Starting with thicker stock will drive the cost of this up quite a bit and I’ll end up with more waste than doing a stopped two-piece profile.

-- Woodworking from an engineer's perspective

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PPK

745 posts in 590 days


#9 posted 09-19-2017 04:54 PM

+1 to what Loren said.

-- Pete

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PPK

745 posts in 590 days


#10 posted 09-19-2017 04:55 PM

and use a two piece. Allows for adjustment of the door stop if something doesn’t turn out right. Not that it wouldn’t turn out perfectly :)

-- Pete

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