LumberJocks

air compressor in shop bathroom

  • Advertise with us

« back to Focus on the Workspace forum

Forum topic by squazo posted 09-18-2017 07:43 PM 542 views 0 times favorited 13 replies Add to Favorites Watch
View squazo's profile

squazo

49 posts in 1427 days


09-18-2017 07:43 PM

I finally got my shop all erected, and I am working on building a bathroom for it. I am going to pour a small slab something like 4X8, what do you guys think of putting the air compressor in there so I don’t have to hear it when it kicks off. I would really like to do this but it means I have to make the slab a little bigger, and I want to keep it as small as possible. Im worried about it getting steam from the shower and also maybe just getting splashed. Any thoughts.


13 replies so far

View papadan's profile

papadan

3584 posts in 3150 days


#1 posted 09-18-2017 08:05 PM

You want an exhaust fan in any bathroom so the steam wont be a issue. Increasing the size wont change the foot print really, if the comp. isn’t in there it has to be somewhere. I say go for it.

View Gilley23's profile

Gilley23

317 posts in 164 days


#2 posted 09-18-2017 09:45 PM

If it’s going to be more quiet in the bathroom then in the bathroom it goes!

View Tdel10's profile

Tdel10

1 post in 32 days


#3 posted 09-18-2017 10:02 PM

How often will that shower actually get used? Exhaust fans are cheap, and I’m assuming you’ll be doing electrical work in there anyway so it shouldn’t be a big deal to run one, especially in new construction. All the local big box improvement stores will have a handy little kit with just about everything you need.

You say worried about it getting splashed? The metal tank really won’t matter, but the electric part of the motor assembly will. I’d be concerned about a possible electrocution hazard, more than the wellbeing of the compressor. Standing in the shower, it kicks on…. Zzzaaapppp! Not good.

GFI breakers and /or plugs are a MUST in wet locations.

All that being said, I’d absolutely find a way to get that thing in there. Free up shop floor space and quiet it down.

View JoeinGa's profile

JoeinGa

7709 posts in 1789 days


#4 posted 09-18-2017 10:04 PM

How big is your compressor? And how tall are the walls in the bathroom? Maybe you could use chains and hang it from the ceiling joists in the bathroom?

-- Perform A Random Act Of Kindness Today ... Pay It Forward

View William Shelley's profile

William Shelley

446 posts in 1251 days


#5 posted 09-18-2017 10:39 PM

If you’re sitting on the toilet when the compressor kicks off, it’ll expedite your evacuation duties, so that’s a plus. Especially if your diet consists of a lot of fiber.

-- Woodworking from an engineer's perspective

View Gilley23's profile

Gilley23

317 posts in 164 days


#6 posted 09-18-2017 10:40 PM


GFI breakers and /or plugs are a MUST in wet locations.

- Tdel10

The compressor does not need to be gfci protected in a wet location if it’s hardwired.

View magaoitin's profile

magaoitin

246 posts in 732 days


#7 posted 09-18-2017 11:04 PM

Wow I can only imagine the toilet that has a compressor fitting on it, to help unclog those pesky drains.

I see a great marketing idea here boys. The Super Flush-o-matic 5000! Never have a clogged toilet again! Stop eating all that bran and start loading up on cheese burritos. Guaranteed to unplug any “blockage”.

We will probably need a warning label on the bowl “latch lid before flushing” “do not flush while seated”. Someone needs to get to work patenting this. I envision using the lid from a pressure pot, with the wing nuts, or maybe a pressure cooker lid.

The compressor does not need to be gfci protected in a wet location if it s hardwired.

- Gilley23

It all depends on if you are getting this inspected or having a licensed electrical contractor doing your wiring. If you are doing it yourself, and no AHJ’s are going to see it, it is up to you, but check your local code. In my state (Washington) any circuit in a wet location must be on a GFI protected circuit. If not through a receptacle, then it has to be on a dedicated GFI breaker.

-- Jeff ~ Tacoma Wa.

View woodbutcherbynight's profile

woodbutcherbynight

3466 posts in 2191 days


#8 posted 09-19-2017 01:58 AM

Consider this. You know the compressor will cycle from time to time. But Uncle Herbert comes over and needs to relieve himself. The compressor cycles, Uncle Herbert has a heart attack from the sudden extremely loud compressor going off. Or worse you and Uncle Herbert are discussing something and Aunt Martha needs to go. You really want to explain that at the Hospital, or the Funeral?

ROFLMAO

At the very least put a sign up, WARNING COMPRESSOR may cycle, hearing protection is required. For those with weak hearts or pacemakers please use the bathroom inside 2nd door to the right.

LOL

-- Live to tell the stories, they sound better that way.

View PPK's profile

PPK

745 posts in 592 days


#9 posted 09-19-2017 04:58 PM



If you re sitting on the toilet when the compressor kicks off, it ll expedite your evacuation duties, so that s a plus. Especially if your diet consists of a lot of fiber.

- William Shelley

This is exactly what I thought when reading the title of the post. I say go for it.
The shop I used to work in had the Air compressor on TOP of the bathroom… oh, and the bathroom never did get a stool. It always just stored tools.

-- Pete

View woodbutcherbynight's profile

woodbutcherbynight

3466 posts in 2191 days


#10 posted 09-20-2017 02:43 AM

-- Live to tell the stories, they sound better that way.

View Bill_Steele's profile

Bill_Steele

193 posts in 1514 days


#11 posted 09-20-2017 06:24 PM

if you do that then you must rig up a forced air hand dryer.

View nkawtg's profile

nkawtg

257 posts in 1033 days


#12 posted 09-20-2017 06:28 PM


If you re sitting on the toilet when the compressor kicks off, it ll expedite your evacuation duties, so that s a plus. Especially if your diet consists of a lot of fiber.

- William Shelley


Funny…

View barada83's profile

barada83

86 posts in 968 days


#13 posted 09-21-2017 03:51 AM

So if you have small air needs, Like a 2.0 cfm and 7 gallon, I would suggest a quiet compressor. Rolair, dewalt, and California air tools all have versions in differing capacities. I got rid of my jackhammer noise level compressors. Methinks its a better solution than to put it in a bathroom and deal with the costs (which I would think might be higher) on changing permanent construction

-- Mike

Have your say...

You must be signed in to reply.

DISCLAIMER: Any posts on LJ are posted by individuals acting in their own right and do not necessarily reflect the views of LJ. LJ will not be held liable for the actions of any user.

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

HomeRefurbers.com