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Backplate/mounting flange for "steam punk" lights?

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Forum topic by AAANDRRREW posted 09-18-2017 12:56 PM 272 views 0 times favorited 7 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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AAANDRRREW

210 posts in 955 days


09-18-2017 12:56 PM

I know this isn’t much woodworking related, but was hoping someone where may be able to help me, especially since I’m guessing most of us woodworkers are also DIY around the house types as well. So, my wife really likes the “steampunk” lighting/shelves etc. I think they look pretty cool, and what I like about them the most – its so cheap!

At any rate, I’ve built a couple lamps and shelves for her. Now she saw a sconce light that she’d like me to build for our 1/2 bath. Seems easy enough, however, I may end up using a 2” floor flange and bushing it down to 1 or 1.5” pipe. I need the 2” flange to properly cover the existing sconce junction box. Doing a google search, I see all sorts of lighting with what looks like a ready made mounting plate of some sort – problem is, I cannot find a source for them. Can someone point me in the correct direction or at least give me better terminology for it? I attached an example photo – its the hemispherical mounting plate on the wall that the fixture threads into. I’ve tried back plate, mounting plate and a few other terms in google, but no luck thus far.


7 replies so far

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Lifesaver2000

551 posts in 2894 days


#1 posted 09-18-2017 02:10 PM

The one fixture version of this seems to be what you are looking for

http://www.kolmart.com/Round-Electrical-Box-Cover-Mount_p_652.html

Don’t know anything about the company, just found it on Google.

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Lifesaver2000

551 posts in 2894 days


#2 posted 09-18-2017 02:24 PM

Here is another source for it

https://www.westwayelectricsupply.com/c100b-weatherproof-cover-round-1-hole-black.html

It is cheaper and they have bronze and black. Price will probably come down to who has best shipping deal.

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AAANDRRREW

210 posts in 955 days


#3 posted 09-18-2017 02:30 PM

Awesome! Your handle name is fitting!

Now, if I can find one w/ a 1” hole I’ll be golden. Or I can always use a bushing like the pic, but it’d be easier to fish the wires in a larger pipe.

On a side note, I cannot believe some of these lamps you can buy…after I get past the asking price, hardly any of them are grounded! When I built ours, I made darn sure they were grounded. Don’t need the kiddos touching a steel lamp that’s not grounded…

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hineps

2 posts in 149 days


#4 posted 09-18-2017 02:55 PM

The canopy looks like the cover we used for an outdoor floodlights to screw into.

-- Phil

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JoeinGa

7709 posts in 1789 days


#5 posted 09-18-2017 06:27 PM

Yup. Outdoor floodlight base. Carry your picture into most any hardware (or big box lumber store) and show it to the guy in plumbing. He’ll point you right to it.

-- Perform A Random Act Of Kindness Today ... Pay It Forward

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AAANDRRREW

210 posts in 955 days


#6 posted 09-18-2017 06:36 PM

Great. Thanks everyone!

Since I have your attention, anyone aware of a light socket that would have pipe threads? That would really be slick. Sorta like below, but would fit pipe thread.

http://lampsclinic.com/e26-1-8-ips-threaded-medium-base-porcelain-lamp-socket-lcd86.html

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Lifesaver2000

551 posts in 2894 days


#7 posted 09-19-2017 01:17 AM

It has been a while since I have messed with this stuff, so could be remembering wrong, but here goes.

The lamp socket you show does have pipe thread (1/8 inch), but for electrical the threads are straight iron pipe thread, vs the tapered iron pipe thread used in plumbing. That is why there is usually a locking ring on threaded conduit fittings, so that an item can be screwed in then locked, so that it can be oriented as needed.

If i remember correctly, it is possible to screw a tapered pipe into a straight thread female enough to use for something fairly light duty, but that would depend on tolerances.

Perhaps someone with more recent experience (and a better memory) will elaborate on this. I could very well be remembering something completely wrong or backwards, so get some more info before buying. A Google of “straight vs tapered Iron Pipe Threads” would be a start.

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