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Forum topic by Karda posted 09-18-2017 05:44 AM 810 views 0 times favorited 20 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Karda

814 posts in 391 days


09-18-2017 05:44 AM

I cut up a couple maple logs, the thin piece I cut for a plate tappers and in the center where I would put my worm screw is only about 1.5 inches thick is there another way where I wont have to go so deep The piece is fairly square I will cut out a circle first about 9>5 inches it will be thicker on one side than the other.


20 replies so far

View nixs's profile

nixs

18 posts in 249 days


#1 posted 09-18-2017 11:43 AM

Start it between centers and then cut your tenton or use a forstner bit to drill a reverse tenton

-- Steve, SW Louisiana

View Nubsnstubs's profile

Nubsnstubs

1207 posts in 1567 days


#2 posted 09-18-2017 01:16 PM

Mikie, if you had a Chuck Plate, you wouldn’t have that issue for mounting. Since you don’t have a Chuck Plate,open your chuck jaws, bring up your tailstock, and just jam/jamb it up against your jaws. Lock the TS to insure no movement, make the tenon and face off the bottom side. While still mounted that way, you could even round it.
Turn it around, mount the tenon into the jaws, and true up any discrepancies and continue until you’ve finished your plate. . Uneven thickness doesn’t mean much because you are the master of that piece until you remove it from your lathe. .............. Jerry (in Tucson)

-- Jerry (in Tucson) www.woodturnerstools.com

View Wildwood's profile

Wildwood

2186 posts in 1972 days


#3 posted 09-18-2017 04:13 PM

Make a spacer from scrap wood. Take some scrap wide enough to support you thin wood, drill a hole (smaller than screw) in scrap wood so tightly screw onto screw. You make the spacer so only leave 1/4” to screw on your thin wood.

Or just follow other recommendations already posted.

-- Bill

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LeeMills

460 posts in 1138 days


#4 posted 09-18-2017 04:23 PM

You can make a quick spacer any thickness you wish. Make it a little larger than the jaw diameter and drill for your worm screw. Probably a piece of 1/4” thick plywood will work.
Or
Much like Steve… and from a Jimmy Clewes workshop…
Start between centers, face off the top, dish slightly, and make a tenon.
Reverse and turn the bottom with a recess. Leave a small nub to recenter again.
Reverse and turn the top to completion.
Reverse again with a friction chuck and remove evidence of the recess. Remove and cut off and sand the nub away.

-- We cannot solve our problems with the same thinking we used when we created them. Albert Einstein

View Karda's profile

Karda

814 posts in 391 days


#5 posted 09-18-2017 04:24 PM

thanks everybody, now that i have a chuck I forget about other methods. Jerry my concern isn’t uneven wood it the the thin mounting area. I have some good options thanks Mike

View papadan's profile

papadan

3584 posts in 3206 days


#6 posted 09-18-2017 04:32 PM

Make a waste block and glue it to your piece!

View bigJohninvegas's profile

bigJohninvegas

383 posts in 1299 days


#7 posted 09-18-2017 04:35 PM

I cut 1/4” ply into 3” squares. Drill a hole in the center same size as the screw.
Use as many as needed to shorten up the screw to the desired depth.
Then I keep the tail stock in place as long as I can for added suppprt.

-- John

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MrUnix

6002 posts in 2036 days


#8 posted 09-18-2017 04:46 PM

Make a waste block and glue it to your piece!
- papadan

Yup… threaded glue block will solve your problem nicely.

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - In Dog I trust... everything else is questionable

View Karda's profile

Karda

814 posts in 391 days


#9 posted 09-18-2017 05:04 PM

can’t use a glue block the surface is to rough, I like the spacer idea

View LeeMills's profile (online now)

LeeMills

460 posts in 1138 days


#10 posted 09-19-2017 03:04 PM

It may be easier to go back to old school and just use a faceplate for initial mount.
Four to six screws 1/2” deep should hold well (especially with tailstock support) and the screw holes will be turned away anyway.

-- We cannot solve our problems with the same thinking we used when we created them. Albert Einstein

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Karda

814 posts in 391 days


#11 posted 09-19-2017 06:25 PM

that is a thiught, I thought I would put it between centers and smooth the side, if I can due that I can use a glue block. it sot thin I don’t want to use screws if I don,t have. opps I will have to screw it is quite green.

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Karda

814 posts in 391 days


#12 posted 09-24-2017 06:05 PM

got the circle cut and mounted on my lathe, a 9 circle. one very big problem, I can’t get thwe banjo under the stock so I cant get the tool rest in place to do the face i was able to do some on the edge to make the thickness more balanced but can’t get to the center to turn tenon

View Wildwood's profile

Wildwood

2186 posts in 1972 days


#13 posted 09-25-2017 12:05 PM

Cannot tell how you have wood mounted. Why can’t you move tailstock out of the way and turn your tenon or recess?

-- Bill

View LeeMills's profile (online now)

LeeMills

460 posts in 1138 days


#14 posted 09-25-2017 01:45 PM

Like Bill, how is it mounted? Very seldom (once a year at the very most) I have wanted the banjo near the headstock. If using a drive center it depends on how much distance you have between the headstock and the work, for a chuck with worm screw it should be no problem to remove the item still mounted to the chuck, slide the banjo and remount.
I have never tried to cut a recess or tenon on the headstock side nor seen it done.

In your pic is the tailstock next to the top of the platter or the bottom? I assume it is the bottom if you are using a worm screw or face plate. Go ahead and cut the recess for the bottom of the platter as well as fully shaping the exterior. Then remount and turn the top of the platter.
If in the pic the top is next to the tailstock, roughly turn a tenon to grip (maybe 3/8” long). You will only turn near the center as the interior shaping will be done after your remount and shape the platter from the bottom.

-- We cannot solve our problems with the same thinking we used when we created them. Albert Einstein

View Nubsnstubs's profile

Nubsnstubs

1207 posts in 1567 days


#15 posted 09-25-2017 03:05 PM

The picture is pretty bad for showing a problem you’re having, but in my genius, I think I got it.

Your banjo is jammed up against your tailstock. Your tool rest is angled such that you can’t move it closer to the live center. Looks like you have a burn mark where the tool rest end is getting hit by the wood. Amiright?????

If you can’t extend your quill any more, just take the tool rest out, turn it around so it doesn’t make contact with the wood. Move the banjo closer to the live center and turn the tenon.

If the quill will extend some more, loosen the tailstock, and turn the quill handle allowing the tailstock to move away from the banjo. Lock it when you get about 1/4” clearance, then move the banjo back to give you the clearance you need to make the tenon.

try those suggestions, and let me know if I am a genius or not…........ Jerry (in Tucson)

-- Jerry (in Tucson) www.woodturnerstools.com

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