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Attaching legs to 2" table top

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Forum topic by ppg677 posted 09-17-2017 04:48 AM 1271 views 0 times favorited 19 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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ppg677

133 posts in 693 days


09-17-2017 04:48 AM

I created a 38”x60” table top, in butcher block style, that is 2” thick. Intended purpose is a dining table.

I know how to do legs with an apron. My concern is that a 3” apron leaves only 25” of knee room.

Any other simple design idea to consider besides an apron? A full truss plan is probably more than I want to bite off.

Would cross supports like this allow a 2” apron?


19 replies so far

View Andre's profile

Andre

1493 posts in 1643 days


#1 posted 09-17-2017 06:00 AM

Mortise and Tenon the legs to the table top?

-- Lifting one end of the plank.

View AlaskaGuy's profile

AlaskaGuy

3654 posts in 2146 days


#2 posted 09-17-2017 06:31 AM

“Most dining tables are about 30 inches high. Chair height is generally 18 inches (from the floor to the seat). Allow 12 inches between the seat of your chair and your tabletop. Leave 7 inches between the chair arm and the bottom or apron of the table. I got that on a Google search.

My computer table that I’m sitting are right now is 30.25 inch to the top. The leg are 29 inch tall. My chair seat is 18’’ off the floor. My slide out keyboard tray takes up 4 inches leaving me 25 inches knee room. 25 works fine for me. I still have a couple before my legs would hit.

If it were me I’d go for it. If you are going to use arm chairs and have them slide under the apron you need to check the height of the arms.

Google has some answer also.

-- Alaskan's for Global warming!

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Rick_M

10631 posts in 2217 days


#3 posted 09-17-2017 06:50 AM

Generally speaking, attaching legs directly to the top is something you want to avoid as it’s almost always bad practice.

-- http://thewoodknack.blogspot.com/

View jonah's profile

jonah

1465 posts in 3136 days


#4 posted 09-17-2017 11:36 AM

Aprons add a lot of rigidity to tables, which is why they’re common practice. Use 3” aprons. That’ll make for plenty of knee room.

View jdh122's profile

jdh122

962 posts in 2655 days


#5 posted 09-17-2017 12:29 PM

Just curious: does your table have 100% endgrain exposed on the top? That’s what I understand butcher block to mean, but others may use the word differently. If so I was wondering how you’re planning to finish it.

-- Jeremy, in the Acadian forests

View TungOil's profile

TungOil

747 posts in 332 days


#6 posted 09-17-2017 12:57 PM

a 2” thick top, unless it is end grain up, would not need an apron for support. Have you considered a trestle style base?

-- The optimist says "the glass is half full". The pessimist says "the glass is half empty". The engineer says "the glass is twice as big as it needs to be"

View JackDuren's profile

JackDuren

331 posts in 797 days


#7 posted 09-17-2017 01:26 PM

ADA is 27”. Use metal or use a skirt. Your over thinking this unless you just don’t want a skirt..

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JackDuren

331 posts in 797 days


#8 posted 09-17-2017 01:29 PM



a 2” thick top, unless it is end grain up, would not need an apron for support. Have you considered a trestle style base?

- TungOil

He needs it for leg support…

View JackDuren's profile

JackDuren

331 posts in 797 days


#9 posted 09-17-2017 01:34 PM



I created a 38”x60” table top, in butcher block style, that is 2” thick. Intended purpose is a dining table.

I know how to do legs with an apron. My concern is that a 3” apron leaves only 25” of knee room.

Any other simple design idea to consider besides an apron? A full truss plan is probably more than I want to bite off.

Would cross supports like this allow a 2” apron?

- ppg677

yes….

View TungOil's profile

TungOil

747 posts in 332 days


#10 posted 09-17-2017 01:39 PM


a 2” thick top, unless it is end grain up, would not need an apron for support. Have you considered a trestle style base?

- TungOil

He needs it for leg support…

- JackDuren

I don’t use an apron with a trestle style base. I built this one out of white pine for my grandparents over 30 years ago, still going strong to this day (although the finish is beat up).

-- The optimist says "the glass is half full". The pessimist says "the glass is half empty". The engineer says "the glass is twice as big as it needs to be"

View JackDuren's profile

JackDuren

331 posts in 797 days


#11 posted 09-17-2017 01:45 PM

a 2” thick top, unless it is end grain up, would not need an apron for support. Have you considered a trestle style base?

- TungOil

He needs it for leg support…

- JackDuren

I don t use an apron with a trestle style base. I built this one out of white pine for my grandparents over 30 years ago, still going strong to this day (although the finish is beat up).

- TungOil

If he has four legs on the corners he needs support. His photo isn’t a trestle…

View ppg677's profile

ppg677

133 posts in 693 days


#12 posted 09-17-2017 02:34 PM

Thanks. I’m looking for something relatively quick/easy to build (like an apron/legs) but that offers good space for legs/knees.

This is not a true end-grain butcher block. It is edge-grain. The table top should be very very strong.

I don’t need an apron to support the top, but I need something to support the legs.

What does 27” ADA mean?

Here is a pic of the table top:

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JackDuren

331 posts in 797 days


#13 posted 09-17-2017 02:56 PM

Americans with Disabilities Act

View ppg677's profile

ppg677

133 posts in 693 days


#14 posted 09-17-2017 04:15 PM

27” ADA knee clearance is hardly possible with an apron. That’s a 2” apron with a 1” table top and 30” table height.

At my local furniture, most tables had a knee clearance of 26”

I’ll be at 25” clearance with a 3” apron, 2” table top, and 30” table height.

View AlaskaGuy's profile

AlaskaGuy

3654 posts in 2146 days


#15 posted 09-18-2017 07:19 AM


27” ADA knee clearance is hardly possible with an apron. That s a 2” apron with a 1” table top and 30” table height.

At my local furniture, most tables had a knee clearance of 26”

I ll be at 25” clearance with a 3” apron, 2” table top, and 30” table height.

- ppg677

The tables at your local ,,,,,,,,,,Do they have two inch tops?

Get your self a chair and do a mock up…...........25’’ works fine for me. If you not building this for a restaurant screw the ADA BS.

-- Alaskan's for Global warming!

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