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Need some advice on Waterlox

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Forum topic by pontic posted 09-16-2017 01:19 PM 823 views 0 times favorited 7 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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pontic

626 posts in 724 days


09-16-2017 01:19 PM

I’ve heard a lot of stuff here about Waterlox finishes.
I would like to know from those who use it these things: How is the best way to apply it Can one apply it with a clean rag. How long to dry between coats How many coats Do you need sealer and then top “finish”coat Will just sealer do Will it go over top of a coat of BLO.

Does any one have pictures of any projects that they finished with this system. Thank you all in advance.

-- Illigitimii non carburundum sum


7 replies so far

View Kirk650's profile

Kirk650

543 posts in 864 days


#1 posted 09-16-2017 01:37 PM

I use Minwax Antique Oil as a primer coat, then 3 or 4 coats of Waterlox, though 3 coats is sometimes enough. I use foam brushes to apply, and allow 24 hours between each coat. If the wood is horizontal, I apply heavier coats. If vertical, apply thin coats to avoid runs or sagging.

After the first coat of Waterlox, you may think that it looks terrible. Worry not. More coats bring a lovely finish.

I sand very lightly between coats, using 400 or 600 grit.

I’ve used other ‘primers’ than the Minwax. They worked fine, but Watco Danish Oil takes 3 days to dry completely, whereas the Minwax only takes 24 hours.

View Rich's profile

Rich

3524 posts in 705 days


#2 posted 09-16-2017 03:30 PM

I used it on the top of this vanity: http://lumberjocks.com/projects/334121 I wiped on three coats of sealer/finish and three coats of their satin urethane.

Yes, you can use a clean cloth and wipe it on, that’s how I did it. They recommend 24 hours between coats. Their “original” finish is a sealer/finish and is a complete product in itself. There is information on their web site about using the other finishes. It’ll go over a coat of BLO, but since it’s tung oil based, I don’t see why you’d want to use any other oil under it. It makes the wood beautiful all on its own.

-- Half of what we read or hear about finishing is right. We just don’t know which half! — Bob Flexner

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TungOil

1006 posts in 611 days


#3 posted 09-16-2017 03:58 PM

I use Waterlox quite often. The sleigh bed in my projects area was finished with Waterlox Original Sealer/Finish as was the pair of G&G tables.

While it can be applied with a clean rag, I find that rags deposit a lot of lint in the film so I have switched to using cheesecloth instead. I fold up a pad out of the cheesecloth so all the cut ends are deep inside the pad, transfer a small amount of the Waterlox to a secondary container (I use the plastic containers potato salad comes in from the deli) and apply it in thin coats.

The number of coats required varies depending on how much finish build you are after. The bed referenced above has 6 coats. The tables have 4. The cabinets in my shop have 3 coats. I would say 3 coats is the bare minimum you will get away with.

It is self sealing, the first coat is your sealer. Scuff sand lightly between coats to denib. I usually use some worn out 220 garnet paper for the scuff sanding.

Allow 24 hrs between coats and be sure you have a dust free environment to work in, it stays wet for quite a while and will pick up all sorts of airborne stuff. If you want to rub it out after the final coat you will need to wait quite a while for full cure.

I’ve never tried to put it over BLO, but as Rich mentioned really no need as it is Tung Oil based. It has a fairly dark amber tone and creates a real nice color on cherry, in my opinion. Be sure to test it on what ever wood you are using to be sure you like the color, with as many coats as you will be applying.

Also, it will change sheen over time. It will appear like a semi-gloss or gloss finish when first applied, but this fades to something closer to a dull semi-gloss or satin after about a month to two.

In addition to the projects mentioned above in my projects area, here is a raised panel door from one of my shop cabinets. This is 3 coats of Waterlox over red oak.

One other thing- be sure you are working someplace well ventilated. It stinks something awful while drying.

-- The optimist says "the glass is half full". The pessimist says "the glass is half empty". The engineer says "the glass is twice as big as it needs to be"

View Rich's profile

Rich

3524 posts in 705 days


#4 posted 09-16-2017 04:23 PM



While it can be applied with a clean rag, I find that rags deposit a lot of lint in the film so I have switched to using cheesecloth instead.

+1 on the cheesecloth. If you use a cotton cloth, it’s best to wash and run it through the dryer first to get the lint off. Another thing I use is called trace cloth. It’s available at any fabric store.


Also, it will change sheen over time. It will appear like a semi-gloss or gloss finish when first applied, but this fades to something closer to a dull semi-gloss or satin after about a month to two.

- TungOil

If you watch any of the Tom Johnson antique restoration videos on youtube, he uses Waterlox extensively. He generally brushes on 3 or 4 coats, sanding with 320 after the first one and 500 subsequently. He then goes over the last coat with 0000 steel wool and finishes with wax. I assume in his business, waiting for the sheen to soften isn’t practical. His results are beautiful though.

-- Half of what we read or hear about finishing is right. We just don’t know which half! — Bob Flexner

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pontic

626 posts in 724 days


#5 posted 09-16-2017 09:39 PM

How about those foam rollers. I use them a lot on large projects for the larger areas. Do you think Waterlox will work with those?

All of yous Guys projects are amazing and show amazing results. I will try to approach your quality.
Once again thanks for the advice.

-- Illigitimii non carburundum sum

View bruc101's profile

bruc101

1237 posts in 3658 days


#6 posted 09-16-2017 10:15 PM

I’ve always sprayed Waterloc.

-- Bruce Free Plans http://plans.sawmillvalley.org

View TungOil's profile

TungOil

1006 posts in 611 days


#7 posted 09-16-2017 10:33 PM


How about those foam rollers. I use them a lot on large projects for the larger areas. Do you think Waterlox will work with those?

- pontic


On some projects I apply the first two coats with a foam brush, but I think a roller would probably apply too thick a coat.

-- The optimist says "the glass is half full". The pessimist says "the glass is half empty". The engineer says "the glass is twice as big as it needs to be"

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