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Relocate the contractor's saw motor, remounting it below the table

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Forum topic by luxlarry posted 09-15-2017 09:13 PM 346 views 0 times favorited 6 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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luxlarry

4 posts in 1075 days


09-15-2017 09:13 PM

Topic tags/keywords: tablesaw

If I could relocate the rear mounted motor that’s on my 1950’s Craftsman TS to some where under the table I can save 8” to 10” of wall space in my garage/shop area. This would be huge! Looking for all input on this. Thanks


6 replies so far

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Ripper70

608 posts in 743 days


#1 posted 09-15-2017 09:24 PM

Not sure you can do that. Most of those old Craftsman saws use the weight of the motor to keep proper tension on the belt and move along with the trunnion when raising, lowering or tilting the blade.

-- "You know, I'm such a great driver, it's incomprehensible that they took my license away." --Vince Ricardo

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patcollins

1605 posts in 2699 days


#2 posted 09-15-2017 10:16 PM

You can do that, but you will lose the ability to set the blade at any angle except 90 degrees.

I had an old craftsman saw and upgraded for the very reason of saving space out from the wall in my garage.

As far as the tension goes, the higher you raise the blade the more tension the belt would have on it. I found that I could stall the blade if it was only raised slightly because the belt would slip on the pulley, but if I raised the blade up more it was close to impossible to stall the blade. So I wouldn’t worry all that much about belt tension being upset if you have a similar hinge mechanism to allow the motors weight to tension the belt.

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luxlarry

4 posts in 1075 days


#3 posted 09-15-2017 11:08 PM

Thanks guys. Like the idea of a hinged mounting, allowing the motor to rise with the blade. Would a linked belt possibly for “twisting” when blade is angled?

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Loren

9608 posts in 3482 days


#4 posted 09-15-2017 11:56 PM

Doing this would probably be possible but
the trunnions of a contractor saw are not
made to take the additional weight of a motor.

It’s a heroic engineering endeavor that’s not
worth the energy to pull it off, imo.

More practical solutions include selling the saw and
buying something else. Both portable saws
and tilting table saws have smaller footprints.

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luxlarry

4 posts in 1075 days


#5 posted 09-16-2017 12:01 AM

Looked at the newer, direct dive portable TS, there I’m concerned with the loss of table area, especially ahead of the cut, and the loss of cast iron table.

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woodbutcherbynight

3638 posts in 2243 days


#6 posted 09-16-2017 01:59 AM



Looked at the newer, direct dive portable TS, there I m concerned with the loss of table area, especially ahead of the cut, and the loss of cast iron table.

- luxlarry

Direct drives are much louder, for those that are deaf anyway who cares. But the significant other might have issues. I am just saying…...... LOL

-- Live to tell the stories, they sound better that way.

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