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Dyeing Walnut

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Forum topic by Ron Aylor posted 09-15-2017 08:26 PM 458 views 0 times favorited 14 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Ron Aylor

1597 posts in 431 days


09-15-2017 08:26 PM

Topic tags/keywords: finishing walnut general finishes dye stain

My initial thought was to finish my current Prie Dieu build with boiled linseed oil and shellac. Having had the walnut in the shop for the last three years, a few boards seem to have faded a bit. Imagine that … sunlight in my shop! Who would have thought? Anyway … it appears that I will have to do a bit of dyeing to get an even color across sap wood, heart wood, and the faded areas.
 
I thought about going all natural and using tea and coffee as a dye; but, this combo is just not dark enough. I found a color chart for General Finishes wood dye/stain and like the dark brown dye. I saw some photos of this dye under boiled linseed oil and have decided that it produces the color I’m looking for. But, with that said … I have never used General Finishes wood dye/stain before.
 
I would like to ask those of you that have used this dye before if there is any thing I need to look out for before simply slapping it on? Thanks in advance for any insight.

-- Ron in Lilburn, Georgia.  Knowing how to use a tool is more important than the tool in and of itself.


14 replies so far

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PPK

745 posts in 593 days


#1 posted 09-15-2017 08:38 PM

I’ve never used the GF dye stain, but I have used Behlen’s dye on Walnut, and it turns out really beautiful with a coat of BLO on top… Good luck!

-- Pete

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Oldtool

2489 posts in 1975 days


#2 posted 09-15-2017 08:58 PM

Ron, just like PPK above, I’ve never used GF’s coloring, only H. Behlins dyes, which I’ve been very happy with. I can only suggest you follow the manufacture’s instructions and experiment on your cut offs to find results.

-- "I am a firm believer in the people. If given the truth, they can be depended upon to meet any national crisis. The point is to bring them the real facts." - Abraham Lincoln

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mayday3374

3 posts in 37 days


#3 posted 09-15-2017 09:52 PM

I’ve used gf dye in a few occasions. A little bit of a learning curve. I found a foam brush worked well for me. Work somewhat quick, long even strokes and keep wet edge. I found that if I needed the color to be a shade lighter, I had better luck diluting the dye and keeping the application process the same. Trying to dry brush or fudge around with it too much just left lap marks. Also try not to touch the piece after dye applied, even with gloved hands. It left prints when I did that. don’t know if this was helpful or not but that’s all I have to offer.

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Ron Aylor

1597 posts in 431 days


#4 posted 09-16-2017 01:18 PM

Follow instructions, work quick with foam brush, long even strokes, don’t touch until completely dry, don’t dry brush … got it! Thanks, guys! Must appreciated.

-- Ron in Lilburn, Georgia.  Knowing how to use a tool is more important than the tool in and of itself.

View Rick_M's profile

Rick_M

10291 posts in 2164 days


#5 posted 09-16-2017 03:53 PM

I prefer a spray bottle for dye, I get more even coverage. Walnut also stains nicely.

-- http://thewoodknack.blogspot.com/

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Ron Aylor

1597 posts in 431 days


#6 posted 09-16-2017 08:41 PM



I prefer a spray bottle for dye, I get more even coverage. Walnut also stains nicely.

- Rick

Thanks, Rick. I may try the spray bottle method, especially on the gadrooned trim. Thanks again!

-- Ron in Lilburn, Georgia.  Knowing how to use a tool is more important than the tool in and of itself.

View Madmark2's profile

Madmark2

354 posts in 372 days


#7 posted 09-16-2017 09:12 PM

Sand it to remove the top oxidized layer. No dye needed.

M

View Ron Aylor's profile

Ron Aylor

1597 posts in 431 days


#8 posted 09-17-2017 10:47 AM



Sand it to remove the top oxidized layer. No dye needed.

M

- Madmark2

Thanks, Madmark2, but I’m afraid the sapwood would still be too light. I’m looking for a very dark color overall.

-- Ron in Lilburn, Georgia.  Knowing how to use a tool is more important than the tool in and of itself.

View OSU55's profile

OSU55

1364 posts in 1773 days


#9 posted 09-17-2017 01:22 PM

No need for the blo if you plan to topcoat with shellac. Shellac will provide all the grain pop, or chatoyance, that can be had. The blo will serve no purpose but slow down the finishing process.

View a1Jim's profile

a1Jim

116335 posts in 3361 days


#10 posted 09-17-2017 02:49 PM

I have used GF Dyes stain quite a bit if you thin it down you can sneak up on the color you want,that’s the good thing about GF dyes/stain everytime you add another coat it gets darker, but it can also be the bad thing, when you apply it you have to get the whole surface wet quickly and wipe the excess off quickly otherwise you will have streaks of darker parts of your project. Practice on perhaps a few scraps first. BTW it dyes hands also :)
In woodworking a general rule is light woods get darker and dark woods get light from sunlight

Edit
One more point if you have spray guns you can get it on quicker than a spray bottle just not sure you can get it on quick enough to wipe down quickly with a spray bottle on a larger project.

-- http://artisticwoodstudio.com Custom furniture

View Ron Aylor's profile

Ron Aylor

1597 posts in 431 days


#11 posted 09-17-2017 08:26 PM



No need for the blo if you plan to topcoat with shellac. Shellac will provide all the grain pop, or chatoyance, that can be had. The blo will serve no purpose but slow down the finishing process.

- OSU55

Thanks … I’ll play with some scrap pieces before making a final decision on the boiled linseed oil … time is not really an issue.

-- Ron in Lilburn, Georgia.  Knowing how to use a tool is more important than the tool in and of itself.

View Ron Aylor's profile

Ron Aylor

1597 posts in 431 days


#12 posted 09-17-2017 08:34 PM



I have used GF Dyes stain quite a bit if you thin it down you can sneak up on the color you want,that s the good thing about GF dyes/stain everytime you add another coat it gets darker, but it can also be the bad thing, when you apply it you have to get the whole surface wet quickly and wipe the excess off quickly otherwise you will have streaks of darker parts of your project. Practice on perhaps a few scraps first. BTW it dyes hands also :)
In woodworking a general rule is light woods get darker and dark woods get light from sunlight

Edit
One more point if you have spray guns you can get it on quicker than a spray bottle just not sure you can get it on quick enough to wipe down quickly with a spray bottle on a larger project.

- a1Jim

Thanks, Jim. Good advice all around. I think the largest area I’ll be working at one time will be the top of the kneeling platform. Going forward, I’ll dye the stiles and rails for the sides, back, and door before gluing up the panels.

-- Ron in Lilburn, Georgia.  Knowing how to use a tool is more important than the tool in and of itself.

View sawdustdad's profile

sawdustdad

270 posts in 669 days


#13 posted 09-18-2017 12:48 AM



Sand it to remove the top oxidized layer. No dye needed.

M

- Madmark2

And don’t use any sap wood.

-- Murphy's Carpentry Corollary #3: Half of all boards cut to a specific length will be too short.

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Ron Aylor

1597 posts in 431 days


#14 posted 09-18-2017 10:14 AM

And don t use any sap wood.

- sawdustdad

Too late! LOL!

-- Ron in Lilburn, Georgia.  Knowing how to use a tool is more important than the tool in and of itself.

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