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How do you do this? (pergola)

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Forum topic by brantley posted 1280 days ago 6049 views 1 time favorited 32 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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brantley

184 posts in 1859 days


1280 days ago

Topic tags/keywords: question pergola

The wife is wanting me to build her a pergola. I dont think i will have a problem building it but i cant figure out how exactly part of it is constructed. Maybe this is because i have not seen any plans for building one, i was planning on designing my own. Included is a picture of a pergola for reference. How is Slat A attached to Slat B? I realize that there is a notch cut in Slat B thus allowing Slat A to slide in, but how is it anchored in?

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32 replies so far

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childress

841 posts in 2144 days


#1 posted 1280 days ago

Either toenails or little things called hurricane clips.

And I would cut the notch in rafter “A” to keep the integrity of joist “B”

edit: BTW my thought was to use the second item down on that link

-- Childress Woodworks

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mnguy

159 posts in 2000 days


#2 posted 1280 days ago

When I built a pergola for a friend, I notched both A and B, keeping the notch in B shallow to maintain strength. In that case, A was ~2” x 2”, so I drove a screw straight down through A into B. If A is thicker, like the pergola pictured, I’d use pocket screws on the sides where they would show the least. Hurricane clips will work well structurally, but won’t be as good cosmetically. Toe nailing would also work, but as the lumber moves around, a screw will maintain a more solid, better looking joint.

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childress

841 posts in 2144 days


#3 posted 1280 days ago

mnguy has got some good points…However, as a woodworker, screws are great. But as a framer, stay clear from screws because there’s no tensile strength. If there’s any racking once built, the screws could just snap. This is how I was taught and my dad (who used to be a building inspector) would look for things like that.

-- Childress Woodworks

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superstretch

1482 posts in 1295 days


#4 posted 1280 days ago

Are those just dado cuts? Honestly, if things are well-fit and the dado cuts are on both A and B, you might not need a fastener at all.

-- Dan, Rochester, NY

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brantley

184 posts in 1859 days


#5 posted 1280 days ago

Thanks for the tips and suggestions so far you guys. What exactly is a “toe nail” ? im fairly new to this.

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superstretch

1482 posts in 1295 days


#6 posted 1280 days ago

Its nailing through the base of something from the side down into something below. Link

-- Dan, Rochester, NY

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brantley

184 posts in 1859 days


#7 posted 1280 days ago

10-4 superstrech. I never knew that was the name for it. Thanks

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superstretch

1482 posts in 1295 days


#8 posted 1280 days ago

No problem.. Been thinking of building one of these myself this summer

-- Dan, Rochester, NY

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childress

841 posts in 2144 days


#9 posted 1280 days ago

Brantley. Really sounds like you’ll need some help on this. If I were you, I would honestly think about hiring a carpenter with experience in these things. There is a lot that of knowledge one builds when doing work like this and if you’ve never done it before, you’re in for more than you know. It seems easy, but a helping hand from someone who build things like this for a living will teach you stuff you would’ve never thought of. And yes, you most definitely need a fastener of some sort, don’t even think for a minute you can cut all the notches (dados) perfect enough for a tight fit. I wouldn’t even try it and I’ve done many patio covers/pergolas. Besides, construction lumber has a higher moisture content than hardwoods bought for furniture and so forth, and once structures are built, the wood still shrinks. Any carpenter/framer can build one of these without plans because the construction of them is standard building practices.

-- Childress Woodworks

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superstretch

1482 posts in 1295 days


#10 posted 1280 days ago

Fasteners probably are a good idea..

But whats the point of being on LJ if you don’t DIY? I don’t think its really complicated enough to warrant a contractor, just lay it out, measure, cut, notch then hoist it up on posts with a few buddies.

-- Dan, Rochester, NY

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Loren

7261 posts in 2250 days


#11 posted 1280 days ago

I’d cut notches in both pieces. Gang up your pieces with clamps
on a flat surface, using a big square cut out the waste with a circular
saw, and finish the cut with a router to final width and depth. You
can do it all with a router of circular saw too – the router is slower
and the saw makes a less polished cut.

-- http://lawoodworking.com

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childress

841 posts in 2144 days


#12 posted 1280 days ago

There’s a difference between doing small home projects and building a freestanding structure. I wasn’t trying to tell him to hire it out, but simply get some help from somebody who knows what they’re doing. At least someone who knows what a toenail is….Wasn’t trying to minimize brantley in any way. I just know what it takes to build a sound structure and from the sound of things, he could use some help (and teaching) from someone with experience, that’s all.

BTW this, right here, is what I believe lumberjocks is for. I feel like I’m giving him good sound advice to make a pergola that will last for many, many years…

-- Childress Woodworks

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john

2290 posts in 2984 days


#13 posted 1280 days ago

I,ve tried to buy a box of toenails but i couldn,t find them anywhere ;-)

-- John in Belgrave (Website) http://www.extremebirdhouse.com , http://www.facebook.com/group.php?gid=112698715866

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superstretch

1482 posts in 1295 days


#14 posted 1280 days ago

John Hahah.. Childress, its fine, maybe I missed to what degree of ‘hiring a carpenter’ you meant, but I see where you’re coming from—and from what brantley said, it sounded like he knew what it was, just not the official name. Anyways.. good luck on the project!

-- Dan, Rochester, NY

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john

2290 posts in 2984 days


#15 posted 1280 days ago

It looks like the bottom of B is notched about 1 1/2” into the left and right side frames and A is notched about 2 1/2” into the top of of B
The top of B does NOT get notched .

-- John in Belgrave (Website) http://www.extremebirdhouse.com , http://www.facebook.com/group.php?gid=112698715866

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