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Seeking advice on carbide lathe tools - What's the best starter set

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Forum topic by Jerry posted 09-13-2017 07:52 PM 4547 views 0 times favorited 32 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Jerry

2310 posts in 1404 days


09-13-2017 07:52 PM

Topic tags/keywords: lathe turning

Hey all, I’m getting ready to get some carbide bit and fabricate my own handles and shaft as the complete tools are very spendy, but the cutters themselves come in at about 16 to 18 bucks apiece, not very expensive at all. My question is, if you look at the line of cutters at Easy Wood Tools site, which 4 or 5 of them would be the best choice for a starter set that would get most things done. I won’t need a parting tool as I already have one.

Any and all suggestions appreciated, thanks in advance for your time and consideration.

-- There are good ships and there are wood ships, the ships that sail the sea, but the best ships are friendships and may they always be. http://www.geraldlhunsucker.com/


32 replies so far

View Bill White's profile

Bill White

4751 posts in 3716 days


#1 posted 09-13-2017 07:58 PM

Go to Captain Eddie’s site. He sells GOOD cutters very inexpensively. I use ‘em.
Bill

-- bill@magraphics.us

View doubleDD's profile

doubleDD

6497 posts in 1799 days


#2 posted 09-13-2017 08:39 PM

Hey Jerry. My carbide set (4) that I made consists of a square, round, diamond and a radius. I had a couple different radius ones but found that the 4’’ one was best for me. I buy from A-Z carbide or from e-bay.

-- Dave, Downers Grove, Il. -------- When you run out of ideas, start building your dreams.

View BenDupre's profile

BenDupre

500 posts in 244 days


#3 posted 09-13-2017 08:47 PM

I have the Rockler mini set. Bought it when they had it for $99. Right now it’s $129. I also picked up the SR (slight radius or square radius) mini tool. I was daunted by what EWT charges for essentially a piece of bar stock handle and a screw. +1 for cap’n Eddie. Rockler charges $20 for a spare cutter. I hear Cap’n Eddie is much cheaper.

Anyhow the minis are just right size for my MIDI lathe. Plenty big enough for spindle and faceplate work on that scale. They make a smaller set for pen turning.

FWIW I still find it easier to roll a bead with a spindle gouge. I use the carbides a lot when i am bowl turning. The diamond detailer plunges right in when i am hollowing. The round cutter does well scraping the inside of bowls. I know you mentioned handle turning. The square cutter makes a good rougher and finishes convex beads well.

-- The problem with communication is the illusion that it has occurred. – George Bernard Shaw

View Jerry's profile

Jerry

2310 posts in 1404 days


#4 posted 09-13-2017 08:59 PM



Go to Captain Eddie s site. He sells GOOD cutters very inexpensively. I use em.
Bill

- Bill White


Thanks Bill, I’m a little hesitant because he only sells packs of three, so that really bumps the price of entry up to about $100.00 or more, but I might just go ahead with it. Is he in the UK?

-- There are good ships and there are wood ships, the ships that sail the sea, but the best ships are friendships and may they always be. http://www.geraldlhunsucker.com/

View Jerry's profile

Jerry

2310 posts in 1404 days


#5 posted 09-13-2017 09:00 PM



Hey Jerry. My carbide set (4) that I made consists of a square, round, diamond and a radius. I had a couple different radius ones but found that the 4 one was best for me. I buy from A-Z carbide or from e-bay.

- doubleDD


Thanks Dave, I’ll check them out.

-- There are good ships and there are wood ships, the ships that sail the sea, but the best ships are friendships and may they always be. http://www.geraldlhunsucker.com/

View Jerry's profile

Jerry

2310 posts in 1404 days


#6 posted 09-13-2017 09:02 PM



I have the Rockler mini set. Bought it when they had it for $99. Right now it s $129. I also picked up the SR (slight radius or square radius) mini tool. I was daunted by what EWT charges for essentially a piece of bar stock handle and a screw. +1 for cap n Eddie. Rockler charges $20 for a spare cutter. I hear Cap n Eddie is much cheaper.

Anyhow the minis are just right size for my MIDI lathe. Plenty big enough for spindle and faceplate work on that scale. They make a smaller set for pen turning.

FWIW I still find it easier to roll a bead with a spindle gouge. I use the carbides a lot when i am bowl turning. The diamond detailer plunges right in when i am hollowing. The round cutter does well scraping the inside of bowls. I know you mentioned handle turning. The square cutter makes a good rougher and finishes convex beads well.

- BenDupre

Very useful information Ben, I’m a rank novice at turning, and frankly I find it not a little scary, but the customers at the gallery have spoken, and turned items sell.

-- There are good ships and there are wood ships, the ships that sail the sea, but the best ships are friendships and may they always be. http://www.geraldlhunsucker.com/

View bbasiaga's profile

bbasiaga

956 posts in 1751 days


#7 posted 09-13-2017 10:14 PM

I just completed my first turning projects in the last month or so. They were the handles for my home made carbide tools, and a stitch puller kit I got at Woodcraft.

I bought the 3 packs from Captain Eddy. He is in Louisiana I think. I have only 3 – the square which I use like a roughing gouge, a round which I use for fine tuning, and a diamond which I use for details.

I need a parting tool, and I think I am going to get the radius square. It would seem the radius square would be better for general dimensioning after roughing with the square square. The round has a very thin kerf, so while it works for this it is slow. The square can leave a bit of a ridge from the corner cutting in. So the radius square seems like it would be a useful tool in the middle of those two. The round excels at contouring and shaping, and the narrow diamond is necessary for detailed work.

Of course, this is advice from a guy who has done like 3 turnings, but it might be helpful to you, since you are in my same boat.

Brian

-- Part of engineering is to know when to put your calculator down and pick up your tools.

View poospleasures's profile

poospleasures

573 posts in 2240 days


#8 posted 09-13-2017 10:59 PM

Hi Jerry,
You will like the carbide cutters. I do not spindle turn, I only do bowls and vases, segmented and solid wood. Have made about 200 of them with all kinds of tools. I have found as you get into turning a lot of pieces you will find the need for a lot of different tools. As far as the carbides I use Capt. Eddie,s radius square and two sizes of round, 1 is 16mm other is 8mm with my own bars and handles. Do not finish with any of them but use to get rid of thick walls and rough hollowing. Most bowls I wind up using 6 or 8 different style tools.

-- I,ve had amnesia for as long as I can remember. Vernon

View Jerry's profile

Jerry

2310 posts in 1404 days


#9 posted 09-13-2017 11:33 PM



I just completed my first turning projects in the last month or so. They were the handles for my home made carbide tools, and a stitch puller kit I got at Woodcraft.

I bought the 3 packs from Captain Eddy. He is in Louisiana I think. I have only 3 – the square which I use like a roughing gouge, a round which I use for fine tuning, and a diamond which I use for details.

I need a parting tool, and I think I am going to get the radius square. It would seem the radius square would be better for general dimensioning after roughing with the square square. The round has a very thin kerf, so while it works for this it is slow. The square can leave a bit of a ridge from the corner cutting in. So the radius square seems like it would be a useful tool in the middle of those two. The round excels at contouring and shaping, and the narrow diamond is necessary for detailed work.

Of course, this is advice from a guy who has done like 3 turnings, but it might be helpful to you, since you are in my same boat.

Brian

- bbasiaga

Thanks for the input.. You know, you can part with a hacksaw or even a small backsaw

-- There are good ships and there are wood ships, the ships that sail the sea, but the best ships are friendships and may they always be. http://www.geraldlhunsucker.com/

View Jerry's profile

Jerry

2310 posts in 1404 days


#10 posted 09-13-2017 11:34 PM



Hi Jerry,
You will like the carbide cutters. I do not spindle turn, I only do bowls and vases, segmented and solid wood. Have made about 200 of them with all kinds of tools. I have found as you get into turning a lot of pieces you will find the need for a lot of different tools. As far as the carbides I use Capt. Eddie,s radius square and two sizes of round, 1 is 16mm other is 8mm with my own bars and handles. Do not finish with any of them but use to get rid of thick walls and rough hollowing. Most bowls I wind up using 6 or 8 different style tools.

- poospleasures

That about sums it up, I guess.

-- There are good ships and there are wood ships, the ships that sail the sea, but the best ships are friendships and may they always be. http://www.geraldlhunsucker.com/

View Woodmaster1's profile

Woodmaster1

818 posts in 2343 days


#11 posted 09-14-2017 12:40 AM

Next month Rikon is coming out with a set of carbides and they look awesome. Saw the set at a wood expo last weekend they are also very affordable. Check the out on Rikon’s web site.

View BenDupre's profile

BenDupre

500 posts in 244 days


#12 posted 09-14-2017 01:05 AM



Next month Rikon is coming out with a set of carbides and they look awesome. Saw the set at a wood expo last weekend they are also very affordable. Check the out on Rikon s web site.

- Woodmaster1

Affordable would be a very good start!

-- The problem with communication is the illusion that it has occurred. – George Bernard Shaw

View Jerry's profile

Jerry

2310 posts in 1404 days


#13 posted 09-14-2017 01:05 AM



Next month Rikon is coming out with a set of carbides and they look awesome. Saw the set at a wood expo last weekend they are also very affordable. Check the out on Rikon s web site.

- Woodmaster1

Thanks

-- There are good ships and there are wood ships, the ships that sail the sea, but the best ships are friendships and may they always be. http://www.geraldlhunsucker.com/

View Wildwood's profile

Wildwood

2135 posts in 1891 days


#14 posted 09-14-2017 12:17 PM

This another place have to buy in packs of 5 or 10 depending upon cutters you need. Of course shipping not cheap. Thing have to remember about carbide cutters they do get dull and can touch them up with diamond card scrapper but eventually have to replace them.

http://www.carbidedepot.com/wood-turning.aspx

Big believer in conventional tools due to ease resharpening them.

-- Bill

View Jerry's profile

Jerry

2310 posts in 1404 days


#15 posted 09-14-2017 06:37 PM



This another place have to buy in packs of 5 or 10 depending upon cutters you need. Of course shipping not cheap. Thing have to remember about carbide cutters they do get dull and can touch them up with diamond card scrapper but eventually have to replace them.

http://www.carbidedepot.com/wood-turning.aspx

Big believer in conventional tools due to ease resharpening them.

- Wildwood

Really appreciate the link, I’m still on the fence because of the cost and the time and effort to make my own. I have a HF set that’s HSS and I had a little “sharpening party” yesterday. It would cost me as much to buy carbide cutters as the whole HF set of tools cost, definitely something to think about. When I first bought the set and resharpened them for the first time, I didn’t know nearly as much about sharpening as I do now. I’ve re-profiled the edges based on a more experienced turner’s recommendations and am anticipating a better result today.

-- There are good ships and there are wood ships, the ships that sail the sea, but the best ships are friendships and may they always be. http://www.geraldlhunsucker.com/

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