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Crown too thin after changing spring angle?

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Forum topic by Mark Shultz posted 09-13-2017 12:18 PM 325 views 0 times favorited 9 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Mark Shultz

90 posts in 2205 days


09-13-2017 12:18 PM

I have crown molding most places in my house – it is a cove profile shown in the picture.

I have a slopes ceiling in my bedroom and I’d like to add crown molding. The spring angle on the crown is 45/45 and my ceiling slope is 32, hence I need to shave the back of the crown to accommodate. See picture of a sample. I ran I though a planer to do this.

The thin section is about 3/16” thick. It make a nice big glue surface but I’m not sure if it makes it susceptible to cracking over the long term, given expansion/contraction cycle.

Thoughts?


9 replies so far

View cabmaker's profile

cabmaker

1617 posts in 2624 days


#1 posted 09-13-2017 07:28 PM

Thoughts….yes….I guess you found out that is not a compound cut for that mitre when the plane is changed from horizontal to whatever

You could use corner blocks…... or just get close and caulk

View firefighterontheside's profile

firefighterontheside

16739 posts in 1672 days


#2 posted 09-13-2017 08:07 PM

I doubt it will crack. It’s only a 6” wide piece of wood.
How big is the gap if you put it up without planing?

-- Bill M. "People change, walnut doesn't" by Gene.

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Mark Shultz

90 posts in 2205 days


#3 posted 09-13-2017 08:50 PM

Cabmaker, yes there are non standard cuts. I was surprised how poor the online guidance is on this, but a scrap 5’ of molding was enough to figure out the angles without using corner blocks.

Fire – It’s maybe 3/4” or so gap prior to planing.i think it could tolerate up to 1/8” gap before looking odd.

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firefighterontheside

16739 posts in 1672 days


#4 posted 09-13-2017 08:58 PM


Fire – It s maybe 3/4” or so gap prior to planing.i think it could tolerate up to 1/8” gap before looking odd.

- Mark Shultz

Yeah, that’s a lot of caulk.

-- Bill M. "People change, walnut doesn't" by Gene.

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firefighterontheside

16739 posts in 1672 days


#5 posted 09-13-2017 09:00 PM

Instead of planing off the back, would you be able to rip the top at such an angle to meet the angle of the ceiling?

-- Bill M. "People change, walnut doesn't" by Gene.

View Sawdust35's profile

Sawdust35

23 posts in 678 days


#6 posted 09-13-2017 09:59 PM

I hope the following helps the OP.

A large room in my house has a ceiling that is out of level by 1”. I used a Bosch GLL2-10-RT laser level to survey the ceiling since I needed to install crown. Where there were gaps over 1/8” I glued a filler piece of 1x material to the top of the crown, scribed along the ceiling and cut off the waste. If the filler piece protruded from the front edge of the crown, I used a top bearing flush trim router bit to fix the overhang. I’ve included a few pictures of the finished product.

View Mark Shultz's profile

Mark Shultz

90 posts in 2205 days


#7 posted 09-13-2017 11:25 PM

Fire, that’s what I did with the planer (I just had to tilt the molding up at an angle with a support piece underneath.)

View josephf's profile

josephf

171 posts in 1912 days


#8 posted 09-14-2017 04:33 PM

There are finish carpenter forum just for this .Pretty sure I know what your asking but I cannot explain how the cuts are made .Often there is no “right” way to do it .
On crown ,generally the busy detail goes on the wall .The top should look lighter .
looking through my books searching for the one with the bead to see what era it came from .it is not one i am familiar with

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Mark Shultz

90 posts in 2205 days


#9 posted 09-14-2017 08:42 PM

I know how to cut it. I just need advice on if the wood will split over time given its thinness

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