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Forum topic by FirstNoele posted 09-11-2017 07:36 PM 690 views 0 times favorited 16 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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FirstNoele

5 posts in 100 days


09-11-2017 07:36 PM

The jig in the photo was used in a Rough Cut episode but Tommy Mac doesn’t know what it’s called or where to find it. Al D’Attanasio used the jig in the attached image to hold a cabinet door in place during the final installation off the door. Because I work alone, this “third hand” for holding the door would be great in places that an ordinary clamping situation doesn’t work. I’m trying to find the name of this jig and the supplier. If any one can shed light on this handy tool, I’d greatly appreciate it.

-- Noele


16 replies so far

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cabmaker

1621 posts in 2646 days


#1 posted 09-11-2017 11:17 PM

Never saw one of those before

If your hinge bore is very precise,,,,,,it could work…... otherwise ,,,,,,,,,

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waho6o9

8029 posts in 2414 days


#2 posted 09-12-2017 12:13 AM

1, 2, 3” blocks, building shims, cut offs work well for me.

Save your money.

View Desert_Woodworker's profile

Desert_Woodworker

1281 posts in 1051 days


#3 posted 09-12-2017 01:03 AM



1, 2, 3” blocks, building shims, cut offs work well for me.

Save your money.

- waho6o9

+1

-- Desert_Woodworker

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jbay

1857 posts in 736 days


#4 posted 09-12-2017 01:19 AM

I normally, (not always), lay the cabinets on there backs.
I cut a spacer to put under the door edge, usually about 3/16” thick. Then I just set the edge of the door on the spacer and move the door up or down into position, then screw into place. Pretty easy.

-- If anyone would like to see my Portfolio, PM me and I would be glad to send you the link.

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jonah

1458 posts in 3135 days


#5 posted 09-12-2017 02:48 AM



I normally, (not always), lay the cabinets on there backs.
I cut a spacer to put under the door edge, usually about 3/16” thick. Then I just set the edge of the door on the spacer and move the door up or down into position, then screw into place. Pretty easy.

- jbay


This. Way easier, assuming the cabinet isn’t gigantic.

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Desert_Woodworker

1281 posts in 1051 days


#6 posted 09-12-2017 03:07 AM

Gigantic is no problem; regardless if the “box” is on the wall or on the floor- do the following- Tack a cleat to the underside of the face frame, flush with the bottom of the box, yet it needs to protrude about ¾”. Add your “spacer amount on top of the cleat”.

-- Desert_Woodworker

View AlaskaGuy's profile

AlaskaGuy

3652 posts in 2146 days


#7 posted 09-12-2017 03:22 AM

This is the reason I like Blum clip top hinges for most things. Put you hardware where it is supposed to be and clip the door on after it’s installed. Don’t need jigs or spacers.

0:45 mark

https://youtu.be/uWurlfsLPn4

same applies to a face frame cabinet

-- Alaskan's for Global warming!

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FirstNoele

5 posts in 100 days


#8 posted 09-12-2017 02:47 PM

I appreciate all the ideas for “work arounds” that have been suggested. I’ve been using these same ideas for all the cabinet construction so far.

It was my hope that someone would recognize the jig in the photo and know where to purchase it.

-- Noele

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jbay

1857 posts in 736 days


#9 posted 09-12-2017 03:08 PM

http://walzcraft.com/product/cabinet-door-installation-tool/

-- If anyone would like to see my Portfolio, PM me and I would be glad to send you the link.

View DS's profile

DS

2823 posts in 2257 days


#10 posted 09-12-2017 03:14 PM

Is it just me, or does it seem like this jig is WAY overkill for a simple problem?

I’m sure I have installed tens of thousands of cabinet doors since the mid 1980’s using scrap blocks of wood cut to specific lengths to prop the hinge, or the door in the desired location.

Depending on the hinge type and cabinet type there are several different methods that can be used.

I wouldn’t let not having this jig stop you from getting a good result. (I’ve never even seen something like this until this post)
It seems a bit gimmicky to me. YMMV of course.

-- "Hard work is not defined by the difficulty of the task as much as a person's desire to perform it.", DS251

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DS

2823 posts in 2257 days


#11 posted 09-12-2017 03:17 PM

An example of a simple hinge jig from scrap wood (On a European Frameless Cabinet).

This is a piece of 3/4” stock stapled along the edge of 1/8” MDF scrap. It sets the hole locations for the lower and upper hinges referenced from the cabinet face.

-- "Hard work is not defined by the difficulty of the task as much as a person's desire to perform it.", DS251

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skatefriday

411 posts in 1319 days


#12 posted 09-12-2017 03:33 PM



This is the reason I like Blum clip top hinges for most things. Put you hardware where it is supposed to be and clip the door on after it s installed. Don t need jigs or spacers.
- AlaskaGuy

+1. The best feature of Blum hardware is ease of installation and adjustability.

View waho6o9's profile

waho6o9

8029 posts in 2414 days


#13 posted 09-12-2017 03:54 PM

View FirstNoele's profile

FirstNoele

5 posts in 100 days


#14 posted 09-12-2017 04:05 PM

The whole discussion is probably academic anyway. I followed the link to the Walzcraft site. It’s only for contractors to purchase it wholesale.

-- Noele

View Desert_Woodworker's profile

Desert_Woodworker

1281 posts in 1051 days


#15 posted 09-12-2017 04:32 PM

The jig cost around $70. They sell to people “who are in the woodworking business”- All one would have to do is set up an account- no contractor license is required… I started using Waltz Craft, since 2000, good people to deal with. This particular jig was designed by an employee, it is manufactured locally in WI and they do not want it, mass marketed to “general” hobbyist, so they told me.
I may just get one, it would like nice next to my Festool sander :)

http://walzcraft.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/02/U2-Cabinet-Refacing-Tools.pdf

-- Desert_Woodworker

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